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The inevitable end result of our last 56 years


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1 hour ago, Matt Allison said:

Those are some real mental gymnastics you're engaged in there, Ben lol

Yes, incredibly, Ben continues to insist that there are no differences between the Donks and the 'Phants. 🤥

Ben still doesn't seem to realize that the Koch Machine bought the GOP in 2010, and has been hoping for years to abolish Medicaid and Medicare.

They tried, once again, this week...

F9RrpTx.png

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Neither here nor there, but not something I agree with:

 

New York becomes largest city to grant vote to noncitizens

 

By DEANNA GARCIA

 

12/09/2021 08:04 PM EST

NEW YORK — Nearly a million noncitizens in New York City will be able to vote in municipal elections under legislation that passed the City Council on Thursday.

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51 minutes ago, W. Niederhut said:

Yes, incredibly, Ben continues to insist that there are no differences between the Donks and the 'Phants. 🤥

Ben still doesn't seem to realize that the Koch Machine bought the GOP in 2010, and has been hoping for years to abolish Medicaid and Medicare.

They tried, once again, this week...

F9RrpTx.png

W.-

 

I think Noam Chomsky is a bit of an academic, without leavening experience in working in government and in the private sector. 

But he is a smart guy. Here is what he says:

In the US, there is basically one party - the business party. It has two factions, called Democrats and Republicans, which are somewhat different but carry out variations on the same policies. By and large, I am opposed to those policies. As is most of the population.

Noam Chomsky

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I interviewed Noam Chomsky on  radio one time. My criticism with Chomsky is that  he judges everybody from such an impossibly  high moral standard. It's like anybody who does anything out of self interest is  to  be damned.Historically the people who have shaped the history of the world were largely people born into power or power hungry, and weren't particularly enlightened. JMO

Ben I don't know  if you're a retiree just trying to stretch out his money in a foreign land. You talk about putting up with monsoonal weather, which doesn't sound that desirable at all to me. I'm surprised to hear you have a wife. Would she actually be living with you? Or maybe you're more well off and doing it out of a yen for adventure which I would think is cool.

The medical implications between the 2 American parties don't seem to phase you.You can quabble all you want about the relative percentages of the 2 American parties involvement in the "deep state"  But if you lived in the states largely on a fixed income and were getting to the age that you require medical services,You'd be an utter fool fool to be a Republican. It's really that simple..,

Edited by Kirk Gallaway
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Also on Noam Chomsky, Ben: he quote you give is vintage Chomsky, BUT Chomsky also votes Democratic and has recommended others vote Democratic in any swing state in presidential elections, because--and he argued this explicitly--"small differences have big consequences" on a lot of average people. He made the point that while the two parties had many similarities in the bad things he criticized--it was just a fact that the Democratic Party was a little less inhumane, less  cruel, on domestic policy and social infrastructure support issues--that "small differences have big consequences" to large numbers of people.

I agree with that analysis. Someone earlier asked who would JFK support today? That is just obvious: he would be a Democrat supporting Biden. Trump is like General Edwin Walker, and the supporters of Trump are the same kind of people who supported General Walker. There is your right-wing populism. Or the later populist George Wallace as another parallel to populist Trump today. Pox on both houses logic: Kennedy vs. General Edwin Walker. Kennedy vs. George Wallace ... all the same ... except no, it is not all the same. In terms of the major parties, even small differences have big consequences.

Kennedy was the US version of the Soviet Union's Gorbachev, and that is the existential tragedy of the JFK assassination.

You don't get Kennedys and Gorbachevs from right-wing populism. 

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3 hours ago, Benjamin Cole said:

Neither here nor there, but not something I agree with:

 

New York becomes largest city to grant vote to noncitizens

 

By DEANNA GARCIA

 

12/09/2021 08:04 PM EST

NEW YORK — Nearly a million noncitizens in New York City will be able to vote in municipal elections under legislation that passed the City Council on Thursday.

I have no idea what this issue is about but I do know there are inumerable jusrisdictions that don't let their citizens vote and yet you're not posting that in 30 point font. The dismantling of the post office and limiting voting centers to four (or something) in Harris County Texas come to mind. The attempt to disenfranchise voters en masse across five battleground states is another. Some of that is still going on I believe.

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43 minutes ago, Greg Doudna said:

Also on Noam Chomsky, Ben: he quote you give is vintage Chomsky, BUT Chomsky also votes Democratic and has recommended others vote Democratic in any swing state in presidential elections, because--and he argued this explicitly--"small differences have big consequences" on a lot of average people.

Yep. Exactly. I understand what Ben is saying and have some of the same complaints but there really hasn't been a time in decades or maybe ever where Republicans have been the preferred way to go. At times I've thought a split between the executive and congress was prudent but not any more. That's especially true now with Republicans ceding to fascism and authoritarianism. Sad.

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Just now, Bob Ness said:

I have no idea what this issue is about but I do know there are inumerable jusrisdictions that don't let their citizens vote and yet you're not posting that in 30 point font. The dismantling of the post office and limiting voting centers to four (or something) in Harris County Texas come to mind. The attempt to disenfranchise voters en masse across five battleground states is another. Some of that is still going on I believe.

Bob N.--

Sorry about the 30-point font. That is just how it posted...I will use plain text next time. 

I am against any type of disenfranchisement.

On the other hand, most nations in Europe require national ID to vote. In Thailand, you have to show national ID to vote. This seems like a reasonable precaution. 

Both parties, and allied media, have suggested vote fraud around the use of absentee ballots. The Trump claims may be spurious, as possibly were the claims about Bush's dubious and late Ohio votes in 2004. 

This system does not engender confidence.  It needs to be tightened up to engender confidence. 

Having non-citizens vote in US elections strikes me as PC-insanity.

Seriously, does this work: Anybody can vote, citizen or not, and not show ID.  

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Benjamin Cole said:

Bob N.--

Sorry about the 30-point font. That is just how it posted...I will use plain text next time. 

I am against any type of disenfranchisement.

On the other hand, most nations in Europe require national ID to vote. In Thailand, you have to show national ID to vote. This seems like a reasonable precaution. 

Both parties, and allied media, have suggested vote fraud around the use of absentee ballots. The Trump claims may be spurious, as possibly were the claims about Bush's dubious and late Ohio votes in 2004. 

This system does not engender confidence.  It needs to be tightened up to engender confidence. 

Having non-citizens vote in US elections strikes me as PC-insanity.

Seriously, does this work: Anybody can vote, citizen or not, and not show ID.  

I really know nothing about the NY thing. It kind of sounds stupid to me but there may be some justification for local representation of something. I don't know and will have to look at it.

As luck would have it re Bush 2004 I happen to have a friend who was in Puerto Rico (he's a true to life Silver Star/MOH winner - solid source) and did volunteer work with recently unemployed and pour call center workers in 2005. They were hired to make random calls to people with African American and Jewish names and direct them to the wrong precinct locations to vote. In Ohio. True story. If they could find elderly people all the better. Carl Rove I suspect. Scumbags. The current round of republicans make them look exceptionally principaled.

Regarding the ID requirement I just don't see where it makes any difference as long as the votes can be verified. The last election would have seen the dumb asses claim fake IDs! And you know it. So everyone's getting bogus IDs to back up there dead Uncle's yada yada yada. They have secure systems in place now.

Edited by Bob Ness
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52 minutes ago, Greg Doudna said:

Also on Noam Chomsky, Ben: he quote you give is vintage Chomsky, BUT Chomsky also votes Democratic and has recommended others vote Democratic in any swing state in presidential elections, because--and he argued this explicitly--"small differences have big consequences" on a lot of average people. He made the point that while the two parties had many similarities in the bad things he criticized--it was just a fact that the Democratic Party was a little less inhumane, less  cruel, on domestic policy and social infrastructure support issues--that "small differences have big consequences" to large numbers of people.

I agree with that analysis. Someone earlier asked who would JFK support today? That is just obvious: he would be a Democrat supporting Biden. Trump is like General Edwin Walker, and the supporters of Trump are the same kind of people who supported General Walker. There is your right-wing populism. Or the later populist George Wallace as another parallel to populist Trump today. Pox on both houses logic: Kennedy vs. General Edwin Walker. Kennedy vs. George Wallace ... all the same ... except no, it is not all the same. In terms of the major parties, even small differences have big consequences.

Kennedy was the US version of the Soviet Union's Gorbachev, and that is the existential tragedy of the JFK assassination.

You don't get Kennedys and Gorbachevs from right-wing populism. 

Greg D.-- Well, each to his own.  I respect your views. 

Authoritarianism? Hillary Clinton is advocating "gatekeepers" on the news. The Donks have been totally absorbed by the national security state. 

I realize the whole conversation on which party is best (or, more accurately, worst) is beyond the ken of this forum. 

My take is the globalists, with open borders policy for trade and immigration (and I like immigrants) have savaged the US middle-employee class. They have converted the US military into a mercenary global guard service for multinationals. This picture is ugly, and accomplished through both parties. 

The globalists escape taxes---Apple says it makes it money in Ireland. And it chooses to make is phones in CCP-China. Income taxes have become a domestic and international shell game. 

Obama was supine on the CCP, along with Disney, the NBA and BlackRock.

Oddly, it was the nut Trump that did something. Trump also (maybe for the wrong reasons) tightened up the US border. 

The ID politics of the new Donk Party is divisive, and poisonous. The dog-whistling of the 'Phants is offensive too. 

I did not vote the last few Presidential cycles. 

For me, there are shades of purple, not blue or red. 

But that is IMHO. 

Also, Trumpers can be awful people but also the targets of prosecutorial misconduct. Those are not mutually exclusive. 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, Bob Ness said:

I really know nothing about the NY thing. It kind of sounds stupid to me but there may be some justification for local representation of something. I don't know and will have to look at it.

As luck would have it re Bush 2004 I happen to have a friend who was in Puerto Rico (he's a true to life Silver Star/MOH winner - solid source) and did volunteer work with recently unemployed and pour call center workers in 2005. They were hired to make random calls to people with African American and Jewish names and direct them to the wrong precinct locations to vote. In Ohio. True story. If they could find elderly people all the better. Carl Rove I suspect. Scumbags. The current round of republicans make them look exceptionally principaled.

Regarding the ID requirement I just don't see where it makes any difference as long as the votes can be verified. The last election would have seen the dumb asses claim fake IDs! And you know it. So everyone's getting bogus IDs to back up there dead Uncle's yada yada yada. They have secure systems in place now.

Karl Rove was a satanic genius, and part of the 9/11 crowd. He knew how to frame the issue (for the Bush benefit). 

Bush jr. and the Iraqistan wars sucked trillions out of the US for a counterproductive entanglements, causing copious amounts of human carnage along the way.

I cannot say enough bad things about the globalist 'Phants around Bush jr. 

Which, btw, included the present-day Donk hero, Liz Cheney. That is spooky.  

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