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Intervew with retired General Curtis Emerson LeMay


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Bette Rogge interviews an unidentified woman and retired General Curtis Emerson LeMay

Bette Rogge, '44, '77, interviews an unidentified woman about her work as a delegate to the International Congress on Mental Deficiency for the President's Committee on Mental Retardation. A second interview with retired General Curtis Emerson LeMay follows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vz__w3Hqy0E&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR24g4C8z5j1k6v36cg68iiBzzoQy4keJRk-4fMKAMh2wjzgVc-BbzlSb1s

[This was posted by William Kelly today on Facebook]

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Doug, a commentor on the interview mentioned the other lady as Hubert Humphrey's wife Muriel which it was.

Really interesting life ( politically and personally ) for this average working person concerned woman.

She was the Vice Presidential First Lady as well as Minnesota's first female senator!

Edited by Joe Bauer
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Posted today on Facebook by Daniel Hopsicker:

AMERICA'S FIRST BOGALOO

As Chief of the Joint Staff in 1962, Lemay argued for all-out nuclear war with Russia. He also had a lot of friends in Dallas.
(I needed to caption the picture. I have no idea what he did in retirement. )

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Later Years

LeMay continued to be a strong advocate for use of nuclear weapons. During the Cuban Missile Crisis, LeMay tried to goad President Kennedy into bombing the missile sites in Cuba. LeMay believed that a massive display of US force would force the Soviets into capitulation. Kennedy was more cautious; the blockade worked and the crisis passed. Early in the Vietnam War, he advocated widespread bombing of key North Vietnamese industrial and military targets; President Johnson thought that this would draw the USSR and China into the war. LeMay wanted to threaten to North Vietnam that they stop aggression or “We’ll bomb them back into the Stone Age.” Outspoken and unpopular, he retired in 1965.

During the 1968 election, LeMay joined Alabama Governor and infamous segregationist George Wallace as vice-presidential running mate. Wallace and LeMay ran as part of the newly-established American Independent Party. Both were controversial candidates: Wallace opposed federally-enforced desegregation, while LeMay called for use of nuclear weapons on North Vietnam. They won 13.5% of the popular vote and won five states in the Deep South--a strong showing for a third party.

Hypothesis: the offspring of that 13.5% now form the Trump base-CS

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9 hours ago, Chuck Schwartz said:

During the 1968 election, Wallace and LeMay ran as part of the newly-established American Independent Party. They won 13.5% of the popular vote and won five states in the Deep South--a strong showing for a third party.

 

Hypothesis: the offspring of that 13.5% now form the Trump base-CS

 

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John Milius, who liked to posture (at least) as a rightwinger when he worked

on such films as APOCALYPSE NOW, 1941, and DILLINGER, a few years ago wrote a screenplay for rightwing director Bob Zemeckis

about LeMay. Although Milius's scripts are more complex and nuanced than his

blowhard public persona would indicate, I wonder about whether he and Zemeckis

would have made a rabid paean to LeMay (if perhaps somewhat black-comic, as in

the portraits of the mad and genocidal Gen. LeMay as both Gen. Ripper and Gen. Turgidson in DR. STRANGELOVE). Zemeckis's

writing partner on 1941, Bob Gale, told me that Zemeckis wanted to end that badly misguided "comical" World War II film by having the Bobby

Di Cicco character serve as the bombardier on the Enola Gay dropping the A-bomb on Hiroshima in

revenge for losing the USO jitterbug contest. Gale and Spielberg talked him out of it.

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