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Stanley Marks: Forgotten hero


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Rob Couteau does a wonderful homage here. I really mean its first rate .

I am ashamed to say I never heard of this guy. Rob found his daughter.

Stanley Marks was rocket miles ahead of everyone.  He really understood the big picture early.  And not just on the JFK case.

Was he the hidden hero of Bob Dylan?

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-reviews/stanley-marks-and-murder-most-foul-a-sequel-to-the-kennedy-dylan-sensation

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2 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

Rob Couteau does a wonderful homage here. I really mean its first rate .

I am ashamed to say I never heard of this guy. Rob found his daughter.

Stanley Marks was rocket miles ahead of everyone.  He really understood the big picture early.  And not just on the JFK case.

Was he the hidden hero of Bob Dylan?

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-reviews/stanley-marks-and-murder-most-foul-a-sequel-to-the-kennedy-dylan-sensation

MMF does not show on Amazon, however it does list Stanley Marks' book  'Coup d'état: November 22nd 1963'  mentioned in the K&K's article... however this too is unavailable.

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That is another tragic aspect.  The guy's books are so out of print.  Because as with Weisberg, so many of them were self published.

That;s why Rob's article is so important as a reverie for this guy.  With Mark Lane, we did not have this problem since his books always got published and many stayed in print.

But I think the Stanley books hit too hard, to the bone with their insinuations the the Commission was protecting the national interest and they knew very well a conspiracy had been performed. So much different than say Six Seconds in Dallas, for example.

 

Edited by James DiEugenio
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3 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

Six Seconds in Dallas, for example.

Arguably the most over-rated book in the field.

Tink disputed the T3 back wound and throat entrance wound in order to make his Z-film analysis relevant.

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18 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

Rob Couteau does a wonderful homage here. I really mean its first rate .

I am ashamed to say I never heard of this guy. Rob found his daughter.

Stanley Marks was rocket miles ahead of everyone.  He really understood the big picture early.  And not just on the JFK case.

Was he the hidden hero of Bob Dylan?

https://kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-reviews/stanley-marks-and-murder-most-foul-a-sequel-to-the-kennedy-dylan-sensation

Outstanding Rob.  Marks implicating Dulles in 1967.  Wow, and so much more including his back history.

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Like I  said, I really do not think anyone was as out there as Stanley Marks was, not even Jim Garrison. 

At least not in 1967.

Now we have some commemoration of this guy, thanks to Mr. Dylan.  Maybe on purpose, maybe not. In any event, thanks Rob.

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James Shelby Downard's King Kill/33 is a likely candidate for Dylan's masonic references.  It too is out of print in its original form...

https://www.revisionisthistory.org/kingkill33.html

I discuss this in my updated Deconstructing Murder Most Foul...

https://dylagence.wordpress.com/2020/04/09/deconstructing-murder-most-foul-were-a-j-weberman-and-david-icke-among-the-sources-bob-dylan-used/

 

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22 hours ago, Michaleen Kilroy said:

He was eerily prescient.

 

On 6/14/2020 at 12:37 AM, James DiEugenio said:

I really do not think anyone was as out there as Stanley Marks was

 

On 6/13/2020 at 11:30 PM, Ron Bulman said:

Outstanding

Thanks for all the great feedback. I told Stanley's daughter, Roberta Marks, about some of the interest generated here at the Forum, and I asked if she had a special message for our members. This is what she said:

“I am so thrilled and so excited that discovering my dad’s work means something to them. And tell them how excited and thrilled he would be that people are responding to what he wrote. He would be talking to each one personally – believe me, he would be on the phone talking to all of them!”

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You know something Rob, after reading your write up,  that is no exaggeration by Roberta.

Stanley would have been calling people and thanking them and wanting to talk about what he wrote.

I would have really enjoyed meeting the guy.  I mean what Insight for such an early time in the case.

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I will tell her you said that. It will mean a lot to her. 

In a way, Marks was lucky that he didn't attract more attention. Because they would have made life much more difficult for him. Look what they did to Mark Lane. The FBI trailed him 24/7 and (according to what he wrote in his memoir) the CIA made an attempt on his life.

When I mentioned this to Roberta, she agreed.

 

Edited by Rob Couteau
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Great article, Rob.

As a black-listed observer of the Soviet military and the U.S. military-industrial complex, Stanley Marks, obviously, had a keen perspective on JFK's murder and the Warren Commission cover up.

It's a shame-- and probably no accident-- that his keen observations were buried in such obscurity.

 

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Great article by Rob and I appreciate the effort Rob made to illuminate Stanley Marks' life and work. All I could really do when reading Stanley's observations was to nod affirmatively and think, jeez, this guy feels (or obviously felt) about things the same way that we do. But Stanley was quicker to catch on to things than pretty much every other writer.

It would have been a pleasure to chat to Stanley if he was around, but I took some solace from the photo of him with his wife Ethel. He had a great wife and a loving family and he lived into his 80's. That's pretty good. 

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22 hours ago, Anthony Thorne said:

He had a great wife and a loving family and he lived into his 80's. That's pretty good. 

I think you summed it up perfectly. He was lucky to have a woman like Ethel behind him through thick and thin. That really is a great photo. Thanks for reading, Anthony. Will pass your remarks on to Roberta.

Edited by Rob Couteau
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