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Fallen warriors: researchers who have moved on or passed away


Vince Palamara
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The Paine experts: Steve Jones, Barbara LaMonica and Carol Hewett. These three were big in the (mid-late) 1990's and all seemed to disappear by 2000 or so.

Best-selling author Harrison Livingstone (twice for High Treason + High Treason 2): deceased February 2015.

Anna Marie Kuhns-Walko: health reasons made her retire. I used to hear from her on Facebook now and again a few years ago, but no longer.

Kathlee Fitzgerald (assistant to Livingstone- helped with research for High Treason 2 and Killing The Truth): deceased 3/17/2019

Canadian researcher Ulric Shannon: in 1991, Ulric was a 17-year-old wunderkind at Jerry Rose's Third Decade conference in June 1991. Ulric went on to contribute to both the Third and Fourth Decade journals, as well as write several major articles still up at McAdams' site. He retired around 2004ish and is now Ambassador of Canada to Iraq! 

Medical evidence expert Kathleen Cunningham retired around 2000 and donated her materials here:

https://digital.lib.usf.edu//content/SF/S0/03/19/00/00001/U29-00082-C51.pdf

 

 

Edited by Vince Palamara
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Mark Crouch has also passed away. He was the journalist who befriended James Fox, who gave him and David Lifton copies of a secret set of autopsy photographs that Crouch had in his possession. Mark Crouch said that James Fox told him that Robert Bouck was seen burning some of the autopsy photos.

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John Judge and Sherry Feister :(

I spoke to Sherry on the phone around 2015. I had simply written her a question, asking if her book would explain things in layman's terms (I was deciding whether or not I wanted to buy it) given she was a forensic investigator. My concern was the material would be too technical for me to understand.

She responded by asking me to call her, which was a surprise to me. I did. She was very kind, smart, and generous with her time going over some of her conclusions in easy to understand language over a period of about 15 minutes.

It's very sad because she had just started and was to be a real force. 

What a depressing subject. :( 

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15 hours ago, Richard Booth said:

What a depressing subject. :( 

Definitely! I remember the halcyon days of roughly 1988-1993 (pre-Stone movie to pre-Posner) when it seemed that the case was electric: seemed to always be on television, even if it was just tabloid tv specials. Bookstores had whole JFK assassination sections. Jackie, JFK Jr, Teddy, and Governor Connally were still alive. Print journals ruled the day. There was a certain naivete to those times. Looking back at it, it seemed the running theme of the fascination with the case was dramatic entertainment.

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8 hours ago, Larry Hancock said:

And I remember Vince's first work...issued on CD...or was it floppy disc...grin.   And Groden's first picture books in book stores.  Not to mention the Compuserve JFK forum.   Its been a long road and people with expertise like Sherry's are sorely missed.

Thanks haha! Yes- very true.

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8 hours ago, Larry Hancock said:

And I remember Vince's first work...issued on CD...or was it floppy disc...grin.   And Groden's first picture books in book stores.  Not to mention the Compuserve JFK forum.   Its been a long road and people with expertise like Sherry's are sorely missed.

I remember seeing Vince's name in the JFK Lancer catalog. I don't recall if it was CD or disk, I want to say it was a spiral bound book.  My impression then was "this guy is the secret service expert" and that's still my impression today. :)

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8 hours ago, Larry Hancock said:

 Not to mention the Compuserve JFK forum. 

Wish I would have got into this subject back then--those were the days. My dad had CompuServe and I used it a few times, but it was before I discovered this case. I used it to find things relating to Star Trek or Sega Genesis games given I was a teenager.

Back then, circa 92'96, I ran a computer bulletin board in Tulsa, OK and was a member of FidoNet. I programmed third party add-ons for my BBS using Turbo Pascal. My memory of those days was all fun and exploration. 

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The Compuserve JFK forum was pretty lively with no apparent moderation and a lot of name calling, libel and some rather nasty comments.  It was educational but you needed to learn who was who quickly.  I don't recall posting much but also downloaded tons of stuff off it though.  Halcyon days...

On a side note, at the time I was working with Hayes microcomputer and computer modems n 1992and very active with much of the BBS community including doing BBSCON events....maybe we passed each other without knowing.

 

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6 hours ago, Larry Hancock said:

a lot of name calling, libel and some rather nasty comments. 

Hayes microcomputer and computer modems n 1992 and very active with much of the BBS community including doing BBSCON events....maybe we passed each other without knowing.

So... par for the course for social groups online. Hah!

I didn't go to any BBS conventions but it's possibleI saw your name on FidoNet or any of the other number of national networks.

I had US Robotics modems and ran a single node free/noncommercial BBS circa 91-94 and then went underground 95-forward, running an illegal 'warez' scene board. I had ANSI artwork produced for me by a group out of Scandinavia called SHADE and had a couple of couriers from different warez groups. 

It was a fun time. Then, all of a sudden, around say 1997 or so, BBSes all collectively died as SLIP/PPP ISP connections brought Internet to your desktop with graphics. I was using the Internet before then via dialup, a c-shell and bash accounts, text only, Lynx was your web browser and ELM or PINE your email client. All command-line. 

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On 9/26/2020 at 10:06 PM, Vince Palamara said:

 dramatic entertainment.

I felt like I had discovered the secret of the century, like I knew something that was a hidden truth and I had to know more about it, I had to figure it out.

To me it was less entertainment and more a voyage of discovery. During the same period of time (circa 1995-97) I was experiencing my own personal "JFK Assassination" as a resident of Oklahoma during the Oklahoma City bombing investigation, which by about June of 1995 I realized was a conspiracy and we were not getting the full truth about Timothy McVeigh's accomplices. I never would have considered that even possible had I not had my conception of reality and justice shattered when I learned the truth about JFK's murder.

So it was a formative moment in my life to find that the government would do certain things and lie so blatantly about it.

I had never seen the Zapruder film until I saw 'JFK'.

When I watched it, all I could think of was "Newton's 3rd Law of Motion. That shot came from the front right. That is a scientific FACT. Holy xxxx. How come more people don't know about this?! Newton's Third Law -- just look! How can anyone argue against this? It's obvious!"

 

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