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Cuba protests


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Grab the popcorn, because this could get interesting very fast. Biden could be faced with a JFK-type decision whether or not to assist in Cuban political dissent. If he doesn't, he could face the same backlash from the right that Kennedy did. If he does, he might take away the biggest political weapon wielded in South Florida...

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/11/world/americas/cuba-crisis-protests.html

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1 hour ago, Matt Allison said:

Grab the popcorn, because this could get interesting very fast. Biden could be faced with a JFK-type decision whether or not to assist in Cuban political dissent. If he doesn't, he could face the same backlash from the right that Kennedy did. If he does, he might take away the biggest political weapon wielded in South Florida...

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/11/world/americas/cuba-crisis-protests.html

Well crap.  I've run into this before, I believe with an article W. posted.  The link wants me to create an account with the NYT to read the article.  I think he found a way around that but I'm not familiar with such techniques.  The article does sound interesting.

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Now I know there is someone besides me who won't create a free New York Times account.

If someone who has an account wanted to, that person could use this facility to capture the webpage. You drop the desired URL in the slot, and the webpage archive app reproduces the page in a neutral Internet location. You'd then share the archived page. It can be useful as well to preserve the historical record of an evolving narrative.

Then schmoes like Ron and I wouldn't have to bow to the likes of the Grey Lady.

 

 

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Matt

Thanks for sharing the link ... I found the following to be interesting:

Since the start of the fiscal year last October, the U.S. Coast Guard has intercepted more than 512 Cubans at sea, compared with 49 for the entire previous year.  The Cuban government attributes its longstanding economic problems to the American trade embargo, which cuts off its access to financing and imports. But the pandemic has worsened conditions ... the Cuban Ministry of Health website says the nation of 11 million now has about 32,000 active cases of Covid-19 (6,923 daily cases and 47 deaths on Sunday).  Only about 15 percent of the population is fully vaccinated.

The Foreign Ministry tweeted that "Cubans know perfectly well that the government of the United States is principally responsible for Cuba’s current situation ... Cuba and its streets belong to the revolutionaries.” The President urged government supporters to hit the streets and confront the protesters. He blamed the United States for restricting exports, access to funds and travel to Cuba, which led to widespread shortages.  The protests were a form of “systemic provocation” by dissidents doing the bidding of the United States. He said Washington in recent months had sought to destabilize and weaken the island’s economy as part of a policy designed to “provoke a massive social implosion.”

I recently read an interesting book entitled "To Catch a Spy, The Art of Counterintelligence" by James Olson, a former chief of counterintelligence at the CIA. In the book, he calls out the Cuban intelligence service as very competent and second only to China and Russia as threats to the US:

“I worked a lot in my career against DGI and against Cuba in general. They are a very formidable adversary. They were very professional. They were very disciplined and they had a vendetta against the United States. Castro focused all of his efforts on national security to bringing down his Yankee neighbor, to attacking us. They were impenetrable. They were tough. We had very little success against them. We underestimated them. And we paid a real price for that. I stand by my ranking of the Cubans as the number three intelligence threat to the United States today. 

Miguel Diaz-Canel is as hardline as Stalin and as the communist as Fidel ever was. He’s holding it together. And the DI as it’s now called is still focused almost exclusively on the United States. And they’re causing a lot of issues. I’m getting tired of hearing about people like a Philip Agee or Ana Montes or Kendell and Gwen Myers, The Cubans have penetrated our government. They are all over South Florida. If you go to South Florida today and you know where to tune in on the shortwave dial, you can hear this sultry, female Cuban voice reading off numbers. And that is the DI communicating with its agents and its illegals in the United States of America and they are very aggressive and conducting a lot of operations. And I don’t like the way they do it. You know, they’re vicious.  They’re all over Venezuela. We know they’re rolling in Nicaragua with the Sandinistas. We know what they did in Angola and elsewhere in Africa. They’ve been a thorn on our side forever. Because I guarantee you, we only know the tip of the iceberg. They’re much better than the KGB ever was. In terms of discipline, in terms of tradecraft, in terms of professionalism.”    

Gene

 

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Social media users have noticed particular activity which in past have been linked to “color revolution” operations. Example:

“Many accounts all created April 2021 with 0 followers/following suddenly spring into action in coordinated fashion during the protest in Cuba”

https://twitter.com/EmpireFiles/status/1414371287787479040

In last couple of weeks CIA chief Burns has visited and held high-level meetings in such places as Columbia and Brazil, as the rollback to the so-called “Pink Tide” has sputtered over last year. Visits were followed by assassination in Haiti, unrest in Caracas and Cuba, election dispute continuing in Peru, and ominous statements by President and military in Brazil. Expect much more of same in near future. The “problem” remains: the Left is democratically popular in the region.

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I just want to know what the Cuban people themselves want. The reason there wasn't a "popular uprising" at the time of the BOP was because the vast amount of the populace were glad to have Batista out and Castro in. I hope we get solid reporting out of Cuba that gives us an accurate take on how the people feel about things.

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