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Sacking the "gunsack"
By Gil Jesus ( 2021 )

"A handmade bag of wrapping paper and tape was found in the southeast corner of the sixth floor alongside the window from which the shots were fired."
( Warren Report, pg. 134 )



The Warren Commission concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had constructed a paper gunsack from materials he obtained from the Texas School Book Depository and used that gunsack to bring his rifle into the building on the morning of November 22nd, 1963 with the intent of assassinating President John F. Kennedy.

They came to that conclusion in spite of a mountain of evidence to the contrary.


The visual


The thing that strikes you right off the bat about this piece of evidence is the color. Most of it has been stained with a chemical using silver nitrate, but a small portion of it at the end is not. I would like to focus on this unstained part because the FBI claimed that they developed a left index finger print from one end of the bag and the right palm print at the other end of the bag using this chemical treatment.
https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipONUSE1S3Cwo7c8CDt5LNQp31Ln9HYCGC7rDMlp
 

So how did they develop the print at the untreated end ?



Discovery on the 6th floor

Let me start this fairy tale in the traditional sense, "Once Upon a Time there was a gunsack nobody saw in a place where it wasn't but was found by two different people."

Commission Document 5, pg 128 indicates that the "gunsack" was found by Detective R.L. Studebaker in the southwest corner of the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository while dusting for fingerprints.


But on the next page, the same document credits the discovery to Lt. J.C. Day, with TSBD Supervisor Roy Truly as a witness and states that "no one else viewed it."

Somebody's not telling the truth here. As if that wasn't enough, a crime scene photograph of the corner where the "gunsack" was allegedly found (CE 729 ) shows no such thing.


fbaGjgkvuQiAMVUTTAmz.png

In fact, the Warren Commission had to outline where the bag was found.

hCBkZVRbqiYknjNwGQUI.png


So if the Dallas Police had the presence of mind to photograph the shells under the window in position as found ( in situ ), why didn't they photograph the bag the same way ? In position as found ?


Because it was never in that position and it was never found.



Examination of the paper


Following the assassination, James C. Cadigan, an FBI agent whose expertise was the examination of questionable documents, was asked to examine a brown paper bag that was allegedly found on the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository, not far from the "sniper's nest". He also was asked to examine the tape on the bag.

This bag would later become Commission Exhibit No. 142.

In addition, he examined the samples of paper and tape that were taken from the mailroom of the TSBD by Dallas Police Lieutenant J.C. Day and Detective Studebaker and which Lt. Day gave to FBI agent Vincent Drain on the night of the assassination. This sample that Day took for comparison would become Commission Exhibit No. 677.


It might be interesting to note that the paper used by the TSBD arrived on March 19, 1963 from the St. Regis Paper Mills of Jacksonville, Florida and that this shipment of paper was not completely used up until January of 1964. (Hearings, Vol. IV, p. 96)

In other words, the paper that was in the building on November 22, 1963 and December 1st was from the same shipment.


On December 1, 1963, the FBI took samples of the paper and tape from the TSBD mailroom and compared that sample (Exhibit # 364) to the paper gunsack and the sample taken on November 22nd.

This is what they found:

That the paper from gunsack matched the paper that Day said that he got from the TSBD shipping room. However, the FBI sample from the same TSBD shipping room 10 days later did not match either of the other two. (Hearings, Vol. IV, p. 94)

Mr. DULLES. Do I understand correctly, though, you have testified that a sample taken 10 days later was different---or approximately 10 days later?

Mr. CADIGAN. Yes.

Mr. EISENBERG. Approximately 10 days.

Mr. CADIGAN. Yes; this was a sample taken December 1. I could tell that it was different from this sample, 677, taken on the day of the assassination, and different from the bag, Exhibit 142.



Armed with this information, the FBI started looking for a match for the paper and tape by checking places Oswald had worked in the past. They checked Jaggers-Chiles-Stovall in Dallas and the William B. Reilly Company in New Orleans. ( 4 H 98 ) They also examined paper and tape that was in the home of Ruth Paine. They even went so far as to obtain paper and tape from Klein's Sporting Goods in Chicago, where they alleged Oswald bought the rifle.

For all their efforts, they were unable to find paper and tape that matched the paper and tape on the alleged gunsack.

In fact, the ONLY paper and tape that matched the paper and tape found on the "gunsack" was the paper and tape that was in the shipping room of the Texas School Book Depository on the afternoon of November 22nd, 1963.


In my opinion, taking into account that the crime scene photographs show no bag in the location where police said they found it and that who found it is questionable, this bag was made by the Dallas Police on the afternoon of the assassination in the shipping room of the Texas School Book Depository. Then they took a sample from the same rolls of paper and tape so it matched. Apparently, they didn't have the rifle present when they made the bag, so they ended up making it 2 inches too short.

And the FBI found this out when they sent agents to make a replica bag on December 1st. They then tested the paper and tape on the replica and found out that it didn't match the bag or the sample taken by the DPD on November 22nd.

The Dallas Police made this bag to connect the rifle to the building and thus Oswald. But what they didn't know was that they were using paper and tape that would connect it to the building on the afternoon of November 22nd TO THE EXCLUSION OF ALL OTHERS.



The tape dispenser


The TSBD had only one tape dispenser. FBI examined it and the tape. They found that the dispenser left unique marks on the tape as it went through. Because of this, they were able to identify the dispenser from the shipping room of the TSBD as the unit that dispensed the tape. There's no evidence that Oswald was ever working in the shipping room and there's no evidence that he took the dispenser home with him to construct the gunsack.



Blanket fibers found inside the gunsack ?


When Paul M. Stombaugh of the FBI Laboratory examined the paper bag, he found, on the inside, a single brown delustered viscose fiber and several light green cotton fibers. 'The blanket in which the rifle was stored was composed of brown and green cotton, viscose and woolen fibers'.

The single brown viscose fiber found in the bag matched some of the brown viscose fibers from the blanket in all observable characteristics. The green cotton fibers found in the paper bag matched 'some of the green cotton fibers in the blanket "in all observable microscopic characteristics." Despite these matches, however, Stombaugh was unable to determine that the fibers which he found in the bag had come from the blanket, because other types of fibers present in the blanket were not found in the bag.

The best he could come up with, because there were so few fibers in the bag, was that they could have come from the blanket.

Or they could have been placed there.



Oswald's fingerprint and palmprint found on bag


Using a standard chemical method involving silver nitrates the FBI Laboratory developed a latent palmprint and latent fingerprint on the bag. (See app. X, p. 565.) .

Sebastian F. Latona, supervisor of the FBI's Latent Fingerprint Section, identified these prints as the left index fingerprint and right palmprint of Lee Harvey Oswald. The portion of the palm which was identified was the heel of the right palm, i.e., the area near the wrist, on the little finger side. These prints were examined independently by Ronald G. Wittmus of the FBI and by Arthur Mandella, a fingerprint expert with the New York City Police Department. Both concluded that the prints were the right palm and left index finger of Lee Oswald.

Of course, to think anyone would carry a broken down rifle ( or ANY rifle, for that matter ) in this fashion is utter nonsense. Here is how he would have had to carry the gunsack if the prints on it are legit:



mpHbXcpnLJ0kJHLDlPSS.png

So how did Oswald's prints get on the bag ? Well, either the story of his prints on the bag is a lie or they were forced on the bag by the Dallas Police during Oswald's "interrogation". I suggest that there were struggles in that interrogation room and they could have forced his hands on the bag. Before you start laughing at this theory, let me remind you that the police opted to NOT have a stenographer present nor to tape the interrogation.

There was to be no evidence of what was going on in that room.

And for anyone to think that any police department who had captured a suspect who they suspected of killing one of their own, would simply sit him down and ask questions is naive at best.

Especially in the South in the 1960s.

This guy was going to get an ass kicking, especially after the struggle in the Texas Theater. Make no mistake about it.

As a footnote, it's been noted that the shirt he was wearing when he was arrested had no hole in the elbow. I believe that happened when they roughed him up during his interrogation.



No other identifiable prints were found on the bag


As if Oswald's shooting skills being better than the world's master riflemen wasn't enough, Oswald was able to fashion this homemade gunsack without leaving more than 1 fingerprint and a print of the heel of his right hand. This is another in a long list of Oswald's lifelong achievements and I'm surprised he isn't in the Guinness Book of World Records for all he accomplished.

This is another of the Commission's lies and we know that because it is impossible to have constructed this piece of evidence with one's bare hands without leaving countless fingerprints. They simply lied about this to hide the fact that the Dallas Cops ( probably Studebaker's ) fingerprints were all over it.

No one one could make this bag and not leave fingerprints. Not Oswald and not anyone else.

Impossible.

More evidence the "paper bag" was made on the afternoon of the assassination: it never contained a rifle.



Evidence the "gunsack" never contained a rifle


The FBI examined the "gunsack" to determine if it had carried the rifle. The examination was of the inside of the sack to see if there were marks or scratches in the paper caused by the rifle. The FBI expert on the subject was James Cadigan:

Mr. EISENBERG. Mr. Cadigan, did you notice when you looked at the bag whether there were, that is the bag found on the sixth floor, Exhibit 142 whether it had any bulges or unusual creases?

Mr. CADIGAN. I was also requested at that time to examine the bag to determine if there were any significant markings or scratches or abrasions or anything by which it could be associated with the rifle, Commission Exhibit 139, that is, could I find any markings that I could tie to that rifle.

Mr. EISENBEBG. Yes?

Mr. CADIGAN. And I couldn’t find any such markings.

(4 H 97)


Cadigan added:

There were no marks on this bag that I could say were caused by that

rifle or any other rifle or any other given instrument.

(ibid.)



Cadigan found no evidence that the "gunsack" had contained the rifle and while he testified that the absence of scratches was not proof that the rifle was not in the bag, he added the caveat that the rifle could have been wrapped in cloth.

Which it certainly wasn't.

So the rifle that was so sharp that it could pull fibers off of a blanket and so sharp that it could pull fibers off of a shirt that was in Oswald's dresser drawer at the time of the shooting, couldn't leave a scratch in paper.

The rifle left no impression of itself, not a little hole, not even the tiniest little scratch on the bag. Since the rifle wasn't wrapped in anything, Cadigan's opinion simply stated was that this bag never contained a rifle.



Conclusion

I believe there's a lot of evidence here that points to this "gunsack" as having been constructed on the afternoon of the assassination.


First, crime scene photographs prove that it wasn't where they said they found it.


Second, two different officers said they found it. One claimed to have a witness and stated no one else saw it.


Third, the type of prints taken from it are proof that Oswald never carried it.


Fourth, there were not enough fibers to say they came from the blanket in the Paine garage.


Fifth, there was no evidence that the rifle was ever inside it.


Sixth, it was IMPOSSIBLE for anyone, Oswald or anyone else, to have constructed this bag without leaving fingerprints.


Seventh, the paper and tape used to construct the bag matched the paper and tape that was on the shipping room table on the afternoon of November 22nd to the exclusion of all others.

Edited by Gil Jesus
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Not to mention that the Carcano had to be broken down in nine distinct parts with several screws rolling all around. One tiny mistake in the bag construction, and a screw goes missing and there’s no assassination by a lone nut.

Frazier never mentions any clinking metal as LHO removes the bag from the back of his car. And in fact Frazier and his sister never saw a bag like this as shown to them, despite the immense pressure of the police and WC prosecutors.

Well done. Case closed on the Magic Bag Theory (MBT).

Edited by Michaleen Kilroy
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12 hours ago, Gil Jesus said:
Sacking the "gunsack"
By Gil Jesus ( 2021 )

"A handmade bag of wrapping paper and tape was found in the southeast corner of the sixth floor alongside the window from which the shots were fired."
( Warren Report, pg. 134 )



The Warren Commission concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had constructed a paper gunsack from materials he obtained from the Texas School Book Depository and used that gunsack to bring his rifle into the building on the morning of November 22nd, 1963 with the intent of assassinating President John F. Kennedy.

They came to that conclusion in spite of a mountain of evidence to the contrary.


The visual


The thing that strikes you right off the bat about this piece of evidence is the color. Most of it has been stained with a chemical using silver nitrate, but a small portion of it at the end is not. I would like to focus on this unstained part because the FBI claimed that they developed a left index finger print from one end of the bag and the right palm print at the other end of the bag using this chemical treatment.
https://photos.google.com/photo/AF1QipONUSE1S3Cwo7c8CDt5LNQp31Ln9HYCGC7rDMlp
 

So how did they develop the print at the untreated end ?



Discovery on the 6th floor

Let me start this fairy tale in the traditional sense, "Once Upon a Time there was a gunsack nobody saw in a place where it wasn't but was found by two different people."

Commission Document 5, pg 128 indicates that the "gunsack" was found by Detective R.L. Studebaker in the southwest corner of the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository while dusting for fingerprints.


But on the next page, the same document credits the discovery to Lt. J.C. Day, with TSBD Supervisor Roy Truly as a witness and states that "no one else viewed it."

Somebody's not telling the truth here. As if that wasn't enough, a crime scene photograph of the corner where the "gunsack" was allegedly found (CE 729 ) shows no such thing.


fbaGjgkvuQiAMVUTTAmz.png

In fact, the Warren Commission had to outline where the bag was found.

hCBkZVRbqiYknjNwGQUI.png


So if the Dallas Police had the presence of mind to photograph the shells under the window in position as found ( in situ ), why didn't they photograph the bag the same way ? In position as found ?


Because it was never in that position and it was never found.



Examination of the paper


Following the assassination, James C. Cadigan, an FBI agent whose expertise was the examination of questionable documents, was asked to examine a brown paper bag that was allegedly found on the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository, not far from the "sniper's nest". He also was asked to examine the tape on the bag.

This bag would later become Commission Exhibit No. 142.

In addition, he examined the samples of paper and tape that were taken from the mailroom of the TSBD by Dallas Police Lieutenant J.C. Day and Detective Studebaker and which Lt. Day gave to FBI agent Vincent Drain on the night of the assassination. This sample that Day took for comparison would become Commission Exhibit No. 677.


It might be interesting to note that the paper used by the TSBD arrived on March 19, 1963 from the St. Regis Paper Mills of Jacksonville, Florida and that this shipment of paper was not completely used up until January of 1964. (Hearings, Vol. IV, p. 96)

In other words, the paper that was in the building on November 22, 1963 and December 1st was from the same shipment.


On December 1, 1963, the FBI took samples of the paper and tape from the TSBD mailroom and compared that sample (Exhibit # 364) to the paper gunsack and the sample taken on November 22nd.

This is what they found:

That the paper from gunsack matched the paper that Day said that he got from the TSBD shipping room. However, the FBI sample from the same TSBD shipping room 10 days later did not match either of the other two. (Hearings, Vol. IV, p. 94)

Mr. DULLES. Do I understand correctly, though, you have testified that a sample taken 10 days later was different---or approximately 10 days later?

Mr. CADIGAN. Yes.

Mr. EISENBERG. Approximately 10 days.

Mr. CADIGAN. Yes; this was a sample taken December 1. I could tell that it was different from this sample, 677, taken on the day of the assassination, and different from the bag, Exhibit 142.



Armed with this information, the FBI started looking for a match for the paper and tape by checking places Oswald had worked in the past. They checked Jaggers-Chiles-Stovall in Dallas and the William B. Reilly Company in New Orleans. ( 4 H 98 ) They also examined paper and tape that was in the home of Ruth Paine. They even went so far as to obtain paper and tape from Klein's Sporting Goods in Chicago, where they alleged Oswald bought the rifle.

For all their efforts, they were unable to find paper and tape that matched the paper and tape on the alleged gunsack.

In fact, the ONLY paper and tape that matched the paper and tape found on the "gunsack" was the paper and tape that was in the shipping room of the Texas School Book Depository on the afternoon of November 22nd, 1963.


In my opinion, taking into account that the crime scene photographs show no bag in the location where police said they found it and that who found it is questionable, this bag was made by the Dallas Police on the afternoon of the assassination in the shipping room of the Texas School Book Depository. Then they took a sample from the same rolls of paper and tape so it matched. Apparently, they didn't have the rifle presemt when they made the bag, so they ended up making it 2 inches too short.

And the FBI found this out when they sent agents to make a replica bag on December 1st. They then tested the paper and tape on the replica and found out that it didn't match the bag or the sample taken by the DPD on November 22nd.

The Dallas Police made this bag to connect the rifle to the building and thus Oswald. But what they didn't know was that they were were using paper and tape that would connect it to the building on the afternoon of November 22nd TO THE EXCLUSION OF ALL OTHERS.



The tape dispenser


The TSBD had only one tape dispenser. FBI examined it and the tape. They found that the dispenser left unique marks on the tape as it went through. Because of this, they were able to identify the dispenser from the shipping room of the TSBD as the unit that dispensed the tape. There's no evidence that Oswald was ever working in the shipping room and there's no evidence that he took the dispenser home with him to construct the gunsack.



Blanket fibers found inside the gunsack ?


When Paul M. Stombaugh of the FBI Laboratory examined the paper bag, he found, on the inside, a single brown delustered viscose fiber and several light green cotton fibers. 'The blanket in which the rifle was stored was composed of brown and green cotton, viscose and woolen fibers'.

The single brown viscose fiber found in the bag matched some of the brown viscose fibers from the blanket in all observable characteristics. The green cotton fibers found in the paper bag matched 'some of the green cotton fibers in the blanket "in all observable microscopic characteristics." Despite these matches, however, Stombaugh was unable to determine that the fibers which he found in the bag had come from the blanket, because other types of fibers present in the blanket were not found in the bag.

The best he could come up with, because there were so few fibers in the bag, was that they could have come from the blanket.

Or they could have been placed there.



Oswald's fingerprint and palmprint found on bag


Using a standard chemical method involving silver nitrates the FBI Laboratory developed a latent palmprint and latent fingerprint on the bag. (See app. X, p. 565.) .

Sebastian F. Latona, supervisor of the FBI's Latent Fingerprint Section, identified these prints as the left index fingerprint and right palmprint of Lee Harvey Oswald. The portion of the palm which was identified was the heel of the right palm, i.e., the area near the wrist, on the little finger side. These prints were examined independently by Ronald G. Wittmus of the FBI and by Arthur Mandella, a fingerprint expert with the New York City Police Department. Both concluded that the prints were the right palm and left index finger of Lee Oswald.

Of course, to think anyone would carry a broken down rifle ( or ANY rifle, for that matter ) in this fashion is utter nonsense. Here is how he would have had to carry the gunsack if the prints on it are legit:



mpHbXcpnLJ0kJHLDlPSS.png

So how did Oswald's prints get on the bag ? Well, either the story of his prints on the bag is a lie or they were forced on the bag by the Dallas Police during Oswald's "interrogation". I suggest that there were struggles in that interrogation room and they could have forced his hands on the bag. Before you start laughing at this theory, let me remind you that the police opted to NOT have a stenographer present nor to tape the interrogation.

There was to be no evidence of what was going on in that room.

And for anyone to think that any police department who had captured a suspect who they suspected of killing one of their own, would simply sit him down and ask questions is naive at best.

Especially in the South in the 1960s.

This guy was going to get an ass kicking, especially after the struggle in the Texas Theater. Make no mistake about it.

As a footnote, it's been noted that the shirt he was wearing when he was arrested had no hole in the elbow. I believe that happened when they roughed him up during his interrogation.



No other identifiable prints were found on the bag


As if Oswald's shooting skills being better than the world's master riflemen wasn't enough, Oswald was able to fashion this homemade gunsack without leaving more than 1 fingerprint and a print of the heel of his right hand. This is another in a long list of Oswald's lifelong achievements and I'm surprised he isn't in the Guiness Book of World Records for all he accomplished.

This is another of the Commission's lies and we know that because it is impossible to have constructed this piece of evidence with one's bare hands without leaving countless fingerprints. They simply lied about this to hide the fact that the Dallas Cops ( probably Studebaker's ) fingerprints were all over it.

Not Oswald and not anyone else.

Impossible.

More evidence the "paper bag" was made on the afternoon of the assassination: it never contained a rifle.



Evidence the "gunsack" never contained a rifle


The FBI examined the "gunsack" to determine if it had carried the rifle. The examination was of the inside of the sack to see if there were marks or scratches in the paper caused by the rifle. The FBI expert on the subject was James Cadigan:

Mr. EISENBERG. Mr. Cadigan, did you notice when you looked at the bag whether there were, that is the bag found on the sixth floor, Exhibit 142 whether it had any bulges or unusual creases?

Mr. CADIGAN. I was also requested at that time to examine the bag to determine if there were any significant markings or scratches or abrasions or anything by which it could be associated with the rifle, Commission Exhibit 139, that is, could I find any markings that I could tie to that rifle.

Mr. EISENBEBG. Yes?

Mr. CADIGAN. And I couldn’t find any such markings.

(4 H 97)


Cadigan added:

There were no marks on this bag that I could say were caused by that

rifle or any other rifle or any other given instrument.

(ibid.)



Cadigan found no evidence that the "gunsack" had contained the rifle and while he testified that the absence of scratches was not proof that the rifle was not in the bag, he added the caveat that the rifle could have been wrapped in cloth.

Which it certainly wasn't.

So the rifle that was so sharp that it could pull fibers off of a blanket and so sharp that it could pull fibers off of a shirt that was in Oswald's dresser drawer at the time of the shooting, couldn't leave a scratch in paper.

The rifle left no impression of itself, not a little hole, not even the tiniest little scratch on the bag. Since the rifle wasn't wrapped in anything, Cadigan's opinion simply stated was that this bag never contained a rifle.



Conclusion

I believe there's a lot of evidence here that points to this "gunsack" as having been constructed on the afternoon of the assassination.


First, crime scene photographs prove that it wasn't where they said they found it.


Second, two different officers said they found it. One claimed to have a witness and stated no one else saw it.


Third, the type of prints taken from it are proof that Oswald never carried it.


Fourth, there were not enough fibers to say they came from the blanket in the Paine garage.


Fifth, there was no evidence that the rifle was ever inside it.


Sixth, it was IMPOSSIBLE for anyone, Oswald or anyone else, to have constructed this bag without leaving fingerprints.


Seventh, the paper and tape used to construct the bag matched the paper and tape that was on the shipping room table on the afternoon of November 22nd to the exclusion of all others.

Great stuff.

We know beyond reasonable doubt that CE 399 was fraudulently entered into the evidentiary record. 

The mysterious paper-bag raises a lot of questions too. 

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So for the DPD version of the story to work, doesn't it mean that Oswald would've needed to bring paper from TSBD back to the house in Irving on Thursday after work? Then construct the bag that night and return with it to the TSBD Friday morning? Wouldn't Frazier have been questioned about that?

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Reading more about this, I now realize that the only way the official story about the bag would work would be if Oswald constructed the bag on Thursday at the TSBD, then essentially smuggled it home with him as he rode to Irving with Frazier. That doesn't make sense to me because Oswald was open about getting curtain rods, so why would he hide a bag he made at work from Frazier? All this is a strange aspect of the supposed events that I never really knew about before. Thanks for posting, Gil.

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Matt Allison said:

Reading more about this, I now realize that the only way the official story about the bag would work would be if Oswald constructed the bag on Thursday at the TSBD, then essentially smuggled it home with him as he rode to Irving with Frazier. That doesn't make sense to me because Oswald was open about getting curtain rods, so why would he hide a bag he made at work from Frazier? All this is a strange aspect of the supposed events that I never really knew about before. Thanks for posting, Gil.

If Oswald had taken the paper to Irving on Thursday night and constructed the bag in the Paine's garage as the WC implied, he would have had to take the tape dispenser as well because the tape on the bag was dispensed through the dispenser. And THAT he could not have hidden from Frazier.

Edited by Gil Jesus
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2 hours ago, Matt Allison said:

Exactly, that's why I'm saying the bag absolutely had to have been constructed at the TSBD.

The bag wasn't constructed at the TSBD or anywhere else on 11/21/63.  The whole scenario was ridiculous.  The only employee who worked at the (paper) wrapping station with the gummed/water tape dispenser testified he was there all day long.  Ate his lunch there if I remember right.  

The bag was constructed after the fact by the FBI likely with support of the DPD or vice versa, FOR the Warren Omission.  Just prejudiced cynical speculation.

Edited by Ron Bulman
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23 minutes ago, Matt Allison said:

Maybe I didn't express my opinion well; I'm saying I agree with Gil that the bag was not constructed at the Paine house; the FBI tests showed the paper and the tape came from the TSBD.

Yes, the paper and tape they and/or the DPD constructed the bag with, after the fact.

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