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On 9/19/2021 at 8:52 PM, Ron Bulman said:

 one led the police there.  

A false Oswald was not directly proven with any sworn testimony so that one is far past verification.

I do wonder how "Lee' would have "led police" to the TT. Julia Postal and Johnny Brewer [neither one who saw Lee sneaking in] lied...both on their depositions [affidavits] and in testimony. The only way that the DPD, the FBI and who all knows who else could have converged on the theater that soon, would have to have known beforehand that their quarry was already there.

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14 hours ago, Benjamin Cole said:

At some point, I sense credulity is stretched. The official narrative, regarding LHO arming himself, seems likely true. 

 

 

One would think that "I didn't shoot anybody, no, sir" would have been followed by a public "I wasn't even carrying a gun" if the latter were true.

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All below presented strictly FWIW.

Jim Leavelle claims he interrogated Oswald about "that pistol you had on you when you were arrested," starting at about 15:35.

NEW INFO ADDED 9/24/2021 - Leavelle also claims that Oswald said "I didn't shoot anybody" to him, and that he felt that LHO saying that without being asked about JFK was a familiar murder suspect's lie meant to cover all later inquiry.  Sorry, but I can't find locate the exact time of that now.

 

 

Will Fritz's Warren Commission testimony (excerpt):

I asked him if he owned a rifle, and he said that he did not. He said that he had seen one at the building a few days ago, and that Mr. Truly and some of the employees were looking at it. I asked him where he went to when he left work, and he told me that he had a room on 1026 North Beckley, that he went over there and changed his trousers and got his pistol and went to the picture show. I asked him why he carried his pistol, and he remarked, "You know how boys do when they have a gun, they just carry it."

https://spartacus-educational.com/JFKfritz.htm

 

Edited by David Andrews
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1 hour ago, Karl Hilliard said:

A false Oswald was not directly proven with any sworn testimony so that one is far past verification.

I do wonder how "Lee' would have "led police" to the TT. Julia Postal and Johnny Brewer [neither one who saw Lee sneaking in] lied...both on their depositions [affidavits] and in testimony. The only way that the DPD, the FBI and who all knows who else could have converged on the theater that soon, would have to have known beforehand that their quarry was already there.

 

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12 hours ago, Chuck Schwartz said:

This is from a Dick Russell review of the aforemention book. The review is dtd. 8/1/96.."Noting the possibility of a CIA “renegade faction” manipulating Oswald, Newman concludes: “We can finally say with some authority that the CIA was spinning a web of deception about Oswald weeks before the President’s murder,” based upon an exhaustive survey of now-visible files that were denied to previous official investigations."

Chuck S.--

Yes, it seems probable, close to certain, that the CIA was using LHO prior to the JFKA, and building a biography around him, based upon the work of Newman and others. 

I suspect the CIA's plan was to use LHO in a false-flag fake (intentionally unsuccessful) JFKA.

However, Larry Hancock, who has spent a long time on the JFKA and also looked at a lot of primary materials, is more prone to a JFKA explanation that a group working out of Miami's giant CIA base, and Cuban exiles, organized a real JFKA. See his Tipping Point book.

The connection between LHO and the Miami hit squad is muddy, even with Hancock's insights. 

Moreover, there is no provable connection between the Miami hit squad and CIA HQ----Bill Harvey's standard operating procedures were to keep no paper records, to speak in oblique terms, and create false paper trails to boot. In addition, many documents have been destroyed in the meantime.  Dulles, Angleton, Harvey, Helms, et al, are all dead now, and cannot be cross-examined. 

Of course, one can have dark suspicions, but suspicions are not facts. 

As a result, it is opaque whether the CIA hit on JFK was sanctioned even tacitly at higher levels, or was a rogue operation.  Larry Hancock, if I read Tipping Point correctly, is open to the idea the JFKA was tacitly sanctioned at higher levels. 

I still hold out that the JFKA could have been a CIA HQ tacitly sanctioned false-flag but fake assassination attempt that got out control.  Unfortunately, I am limited to what is online for my research, as I live offshore.  

That's my story and I am sticking with it. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"James Douglass in JFK and The Unspeakable presented a pretty compelling case for such.  Butch Burroughs, the concession stand operator, and person left in charge of operations at the time...."

  I absolutely agree that there are some compelling statements. As I stated...there was no sworn testimony to hold up as evidence. However I would be willing to demonstrate to anyone that the testimony I mentioned  is plastered with lies.

 

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Benjamin, interesting post.  Jefferson Morley is a JFKA researcher who has done a lot of work on the connection between Miami , New Orleans and CIA HQ.  This is from his web site "JFK Facts"..

In a court motion filed last week, the CIA acknowledged for the first time that deceased CIA officer George Joannides lived in New Orleans while handling contacts with an anti-Castro student organization whose members had a series of encounters with accused presidential assassin Lee Oswald in August 1963.

The unexpected admission came in arguments before a federal court judge about whether the CIA is obliged to pay $295,000 in legal fees incurred during my Freedom of Information Act lawsuit concerning certain 50-year-old JFK assassination records.

In a previous court filing, my attorney Jim Lesar argued that two documents released over CIA objections in 2008 were significant because they showed that Joannides’s espionage assignment took him to New Orleans where Oswald lived.

 

In a 38-page response U.S. Attorney Ron Machen disputed the claim that Joannides had traveled to New Orleans in the spring of 1964 at the time Warren Commission was investigating Oswald’s contacts with anti-Castro Cubans.

Machen said the documents showed only that Joannides had maintained a residence in New Orleans.

ron-machen.jpg U.S Attorney Ron Machen.

“New Orleans is clearly listed as Joannides’ place of residence when on home leave, and the form does not put him in New Orleans on the dates cited by Plaintiff,” Machen stated.

Joannides and his family lived in Miami from 1962-64, according to CIA records and interviews with former colleagues. Joannides’s residence on 65th Avenue in Southwest Miami was listed in the 1963 Miami phone book.

Machen’s filing did not disclose why Joannides maintained a second residence in New Orleans.

Whatever the date of Joannides’s travel to New Orleans, Machen’s motion confirms that Joannides lived in the Crescent City at same time, or shortly after, the anti-Castro student group under his control had contact with Kennedy’s accused killer.

The admission is significant because Joannides’s financial support for Oswald’s antagonists among the anti-Castro exiles was not disclosed to the Warren Commission. Former commission staffer Burt Griffin, now a judge in Ohio, recently told AP reporter David Porter that the CIA’s failure to disclose Joannides’s actions in 1963 was an act of “bad faith.”

Joannides, who died in 1990, was never questioned by JFK investigators about contacts between the anti-Castro students he supported and Kennedy’s accused killer.

The CIA in  New Orleans

Joannides is one of the most significant new characters to emerge in the always controversial story of JFK’s assassination.

The New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Associated Press have all reported in recent years on the unusual secrecy around his role in the events of 1963.

As an undercover CIA officer living in New Orleans, Joannides was well positioned to report on Oswald’s actions in late 1963.

Using the alias “Howard,” Joannides served as case officer for the Cuban Student Directorate (DRE),  the anti-Castro organizations funded by the agency that publicized Oswald’s pro-Castro ways both before and after JFK was killed. He also served as chief of the psychological warfare operations branch of the CIA’s Miami station, according to declassified CIA records.

The CIA had an office in New Orleans where Oswald, an itinerant ex-Marine married to a Russian woman, lived from April to September 1963.

Oswald-in-NO-300x257.jpg Lee Oswald came to the attention of CIA-funded anti-Castro exiles in New Orleans in the summer of 1963.

In August 1963, Oswald had a series of encounters with members of the New Orleans chapter of the Cuban Student Directorate who challenged his public support of Cuban president Fidel Castro.

The Cuban students publicized and denounced Oswald’s pro-Castro activities on a local radio program.

They sent one member, described as an “intelligence officer,” to visit Oswald’s house posing as a Castro supporter, to learn more about him.

The group issued a press release on August 21, 1963, calling for a congressional investigation of Oswald, who had not shot anyone at that point.

At the time, the CIA, via Joannides, supplied the Cuban students in Miami with $51,000 a month, according to CIA memo found in the JFK Library in Boston. The group’s activities involved “propaganda, political action and intelligence collection,” according to Joannides’s fitness evaluation from the summer of 1963.

When it came to Oswald, the DRE delivered what the CIA paid for.

VERSO2-225x300.jpg The first JFK conspiracy theory, published with CIA support, on Nov. 23, 1963.

Within an hour of Oswald’s arrest for killing JFK on November 22, 1963, DRE leaders in Miami called reporters to say the president had been killed by a communist. The group’s information about Oswald helped generate headlines nationwide about “the pro-Castro gunman.”

The day after the assassination, the DRE published a broadsheet featuring the photos of Oswald and Castro under the headline “The Presumed Assassins.”

It was one of the first JFK conspiracy scenarios to reach public print. According to former members of the DRE, the group was wholly dependent on CIA funds provided by Joannides at the time.

‘Attenuated connection’

My Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, filed in 2003, sought records that would show what Joannides knew about the contacts between the DRE and Oswald, as well as what he reported to his superiors.

In ten years of litigation, CIA officials have stated repeatedly said they will “neither confirm nor deny” the existence of records related to Joannides’s participation in any specific covert project, operation or assignment in the summer of 1963.

The phrase, “neither confirm nor deny,” is a standard CIA response to inquiries about covert operations.

In the Nov. 7 court filing, Machen stated:

“While it is true that Joannides was a CIA officer and liaison to DRE, an anti-Castro group that had a couple (sic) of encounters with Oswald, this doesn’t implicate either Joannides or DRE in the assassination. Even then, the records cited for support by Plaintiff do not pertain to this attenuated connection, and those that do have already been publicly released in the JFK Act collection.”

Machen’s sworn statement erred in saying members of the group had “a couple of encounters” with Oswald.

In fact, the Warren Commission report found that DRE members came in personal contact with Oswald on five different occasions in August 1963.

Joannides medal Retired CIA officer George Joannides (left) received the Career Intelligence Medal from deputy CIA director Bobby Ray Inman on July 15, 1981.
(Photo credit: CIA)

 

A medal for his service

In the Nov. 7 filing, Machen also disputed the significance of CIA records, released under appellate court order in 2008, that revealed Joannides had received a CIA medal.

In a previous filing, I argued that the previously unknown honor reflected official approval of Joannides’s actions in 1963 and in 1978, when he served as the CIA’s liaison to congressional investigators looking into Kennedy’s murder.

The CIA rejected that claim, saying that the declassified citation of the medal “does not address any specific assignment, rather it speaks in terms of 28 years of [Joannides’s] cumulative service ‘in diverse assignments of increasing responsibility at Headquarters, the domestic field and overseas.”

The specific reasons why Joannides was honored remain secret, even 50 years after the fact. The CIA has asserted in previous federal court filings that a five-page 1981 memo to Joannides’s superiors about the medal cannot be made public — for reasons of “national security.”

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I've had 3 thoughts:

1) Was Lee Oswald ever seen in that theater before? I've never seen anyone say that. If he'd never been there before, what are the implications of that?

2) The scuffle in the theater was brought about by Nick McDonald. Read his WC testimony carefully.

3) Oswald's whole demeanor changed Saturday afternoon following a 12:30 PM interrogation that the Dallas Police did their best (but failed) to hide.

Steve Thomas

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On 9/21/2021 at 4:25 PM, Karl Hilliard said:

A false Oswald was not directly proven with any sworn testimony so that one is far past verification.

I do wonder how "Lee' would have "led police" to the TT. Julia Postal and Johnny Brewer [neither one who saw Lee sneaking in] lied...both on their depositions [affidavits] and in testimony. The only way that the DPD, the FBI and who all knows who else could have converged on the theater that soon, would have to have known beforehand that their quarry was already there.

That's the problem, they did.  They or the WC didn't question Burroughs in depth, or the other guy who observed the rear exit/arrest.  They didn't want to know more, than some of them did.  Then the list of other witnesses in the theater was conveniently lost.  Why the DPD report of Oswald arrested in the balcony from I believe a Sargent to his superior, a day later?  It's in the thread I inked. 

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13 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

I've had 3 thoughts:

1) Was Lee Oswald ever seen in that theater before? I've never seen anyone say that. If he'd never been there before, what are the implications of that?

2) The scuffle in the theater was brought about by Nick McDonald. Read his WC testimony carefully.

3) Oswald's whole demeanor changed Saturday afternoon following a 12:30 PM interrogation that the Dallas Police did their best (but failed) to hide.

Steve Thomas

Steve,

How did his demeanor change after 12:30 on 11/23?

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9 hours ago, Steve Thomas said:

I've had 3 thoughts:

1) Was Lee Oswald ever seen in that theater before? I've never seen anyone say that. If he'd never been there before, what are the implications of that?

2) The scuffle in the theater was brought about by Nick McDonald. Read his WC testimony carefully.

3) Oswald's whole demeanor changed Saturday afternoon following a 12:30 PM interrogation that the Dallas Police did their best (but failed) to hide.

Steve Thomas

1)

Quote

Mr. BALL. Let me see. Had you ever seen this man before then at that particular theatre?
Mrs. POSTAL. Not that I know of, huh-uh.

Postal probably only ever just looked at the money that someone gave her for a ticket and made change if she had to.

2)

Quote

Mr. BALL - What did you do?
Mr. McDONALD - Well, when I got to the front of the theater there was several police cars already at the scene, and I surmised that officers were already inside the theater.
So I decided to go to the rear, in the alley, and seal off the rear. I parked my squad car. I noticed there were three or four other officers standing outside with shotguns guarding the rear exits. There were three other officers at the rear door. I joined them. We walked into the rear exit door over the alley.
Mr. BALL - What were their names?
Mr. McDONALD - Officer Hawkins, T. A. Hutson, and C. T. Walker. And as we got inside the door, we were met by a man that was in civilian clothes, a suit, and he told us that the man that acted suspiciously as he ran into the theater was sitting downstairs in the orchestra seats, and not in the balcony. He was sitting at the rear of the theater alone.
Officer Walker and I went to the exit curtains that is to the left of the movie screen. I looked into the audience. I saw the person that the shoe store salesman had pointed out to us.
Mr. BALL - Were the lights on or off?
Mr. McDONALD - The lights were up, and the movie was playing at this time.

"Several police cars were already at the scene". McDonald chose to [drive?] around to the rear. A guy in a suit met them. and told them that the suspect was sitting downstairs and not in the balcony. I wonder who this suit was [Johnny Brewer?] Brewer did not see Oswald outside of the shoe store like he lied said. Radio reports of the Tippit shooting were not broadcast until after Oswald had been arrested.  

Quote

Mr. McDONALD -  but I kept my eye on him and any other persons. 
And just as I got to the row where the suspect was sitting, I stopped abruptly, and turned in and told him to get on his feet. He rose immediately, bringing up both hands. He got this hand about shoulder high, his left hand shoulder high, and he got his right hand about breast high. He said, "Well, it is all over now."
As he said this, I put my left hand on his waist and then his hand went to the waist. And this hand struck me between the eyes on the bridge of the nose.

Supposedly, this suspect was involved in the shooting of a Dallas policeman [which didn't happen here even before Bonnie and Clyde] Unafraid it would seem... McDonald grabbed Lee around the waist? [Shall we dance] In the papers' story back then, McDonald said that he had his gun drawn ["If there was trouble I was ready for it " he said]

That statement would not be made in testimony or else what happened to that gun during/after the 'fight'? Needless to say, a similar suspect today would be blasted before he could think about it. Like a fish net, the whole story simply didn't hold water.

3) Unfortunately Neither the DPD, the FBI, The Secret Service or anyone else had bothered to locate a tape recorder or a stenographer for that interrogation [or didn't really want to]

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26 minutes ago, Karl Hilliard said:

1)

Postal probably only ever just looked at the money that someone gave her for a ticket and made change if she had to.

2)

"Several police cars were already at the scene". McDonald chose to [drive?] around to the rear. A guy in a suit met them. and told them that the suspect was sitting downstairs and not in the balcony. I wonder who this suit was [Johnny Brewer?] Brewer did not see Oswald outside of the shoe store like he lied said. Radio reports of the Tippit shooting were not broadcast until after Oswald had been arrested.  

Supposedly, this suspect was involved in the shooting of a Dallas policeman [which didn't happen here even before Bonnie and Clyde] Unafraid it would seem... McDonald grabbed Lee around the waist? [Shall we dance] In the papers' story back then, McDonald said that he had his gun drawn ["If there was trouble I was ready for it " he said]

That statement would not be made in testimony or else what happened to that gun during/after the 'fight'? Needless to say, a similar suspect today would be blasted before he could think about it. Like a fish net, the whole story simply didn't hold water.

3) Unfortunately Neither the DPD, the FBI, The Secret Service or anyone else had bothered to locate a tape recorder or a stenographer for that interrogation [or didn't really want to]

2. Brewer let "some" police officer(s) in the side door/emergency exit per his testimony/statement if I remember right.  He never said the back door, near the screen.  From whence Mc Donald supposedly came ???  IDK, maybe my memory of what I've read is slipping.

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19 hours ago, Chuck Schwartz said:

Benjamin, interesting post.  Jefferson Morley is a JFKA researcher who has done a lot of work on the connection between Miami , New Orleans and CIA HQ.  This is from his web site "JFK Facts"..

In a court motion filed last week, the CIA acknowledged for the first time that deceased CIA officer George Joannides lived in New Orleans while handling contacts with an anti-Castro student organization whose members had a series of encounters with accused presidential assassin Lee Oswald in August 1963.

The unexpected admission came in arguments before a federal court judge about whether the CIA is obliged to pay $295,000 in legal fees incurred during my Freedom of Information Act lawsuit concerning certain 50-year-old JFK assassination records.

In a previous court filing, my attorney Jim Lesar argued that two documents released over CIA objections in 2008 were significant because they showed that Joannides’s espionage assignment took him to New Orleans where Oswald lived.

 

In a 38-page response U.S. Attorney Ron Machen disputed the claim that Joannides had traveled to New Orleans in the spring of 1964 at the time Warren Commission was investigating Oswald’s contacts with anti-Castro Cubans.

Machen said the documents showed only that Joannides had maintained a residence in New Orleans.

ron-machen.jpg U.S Attorney Ron Machen.

“New Orleans is clearly listed as Joannides’ place of residence when on home leave, and the form does not put him in New Orleans on the dates cited by Plaintiff,” Machen stated.

Joannides and his family lived in Miami from 1962-64, according to CIA records and interviews with former colleagues. Joannides’s residence on 65th Avenue in Southwest Miami was listed in the 1963 Miami phone book.

Machen’s filing did not disclose why Joannides maintained a second residence in New Orleans.

Whatever the date of Joannides’s travel to New Orleans, Machen’s motion confirms that Joannides lived in the Crescent City at same time, or shortly after, the anti-Castro student group under his control had contact with Kennedy’s accused killer.

The admission is significant because Joannides’s financial support for Oswald’s antagonists among the anti-Castro exiles was not disclosed to the Warren Commission. Former commission staffer Burt Griffin, now a judge in Ohio, recently told AP reporter David Porter that the CIA’s failure to disclose Joannides’s actions in 1963 was an act of “bad faith.”

Joannides, who died in 1990, was never questioned by JFK investigators about contacts between the anti-Castro students he supported and Kennedy’s accused killer.

The CIA in  New Orleans

Joannides is one of the most significant new characters to emerge in the always controversial story of JFK’s assassination.

The New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Associated Press have all reported in recent years on the unusual secrecy around his role in the events of 1963.

As an undercover CIA officer living in New Orleans, Joannides was well positioned to report on Oswald’s actions in late 1963.

Using the alias “Howard,” Joannides served as case officer for the Cuban Student Directorate (DRE),  the anti-Castro organizations funded by the agency that publicized Oswald’s pro-Castro ways both before and after JFK was killed. He also served as chief of the psychological warfare operations branch of the CIA’s Miami station, according to declassified CIA records.

The CIA had an office in New Orleans where Oswald, an itinerant ex-Marine married to a Russian woman, lived from April to September 1963.

Oswald-in-NO-300x257.jpg Lee Oswald came to the attention of CIA-funded anti-Castro exiles in New Orleans in the summer of 1963.

In August 1963, Oswald had a series of encounters with members of the New Orleans chapter of the Cuban Student Directorate who challenged his public support of Cuban president Fidel Castro.

The Cuban students publicized and denounced Oswald’s pro-Castro activities on a local radio program.

They sent one member, described as an “intelligence officer,” to visit Oswald’s house posing as a Castro supporter, to learn more about him.

The group issued a press release on August 21, 1963, calling for a congressional investigation of Oswald, who had not shot anyone at that point.

At the time, the CIA, via Joannides, supplied the Cuban students in Miami with $51,000 a month, according to CIA memo found in the JFK Library in Boston. The group’s activities involved “propaganda, political action and intelligence collection,” according to Joannides’s fitness evaluation from the summer of 1963.

When it came to Oswald, the DRE delivered what the CIA paid for.

VERSO2-225x300.jpg The first JFK conspiracy theory, published with CIA support, on Nov. 23, 1963.

Within an hour of Oswald’s arrest for killing JFK on November 22, 1963, DRE leaders in Miami called reporters to say the president had been killed by a communist. The group’s information about Oswald helped generate headlines nationwide about “the pro-Castro gunman.”

The day after the assassination, the DRE published a broadsheet featuring the photos of Oswald and Castro under the headline “The Presumed Assassins.”

It was one of the first JFK conspiracy scenarios to reach public print. According to former members of the DRE, the group was wholly dependent on CIA funds provided by Joannides at the time.

‘Attenuated connection’

My Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, filed in 2003, sought records that would show what Joannides knew about the contacts between the DRE and Oswald, as well as what he reported to his superiors.

In ten years of litigation, CIA officials have stated repeatedly said they will “neither confirm nor deny” the existence of records related to Joannides’s participation in any specific covert project, operation or assignment in the summer of 1963.

The phrase, “neither confirm nor deny,” is a standard CIA response to inquiries about covert operations.

In the Nov. 7 court filing, Machen stated:

“While it is true that Joannides was a CIA officer and liaison to DRE, an anti-Castro group that had a couple (sic) of encounters with Oswald, this doesn’t implicate either Joannides or DRE in the assassination. Even then, the records cited for support by Plaintiff do not pertain to this attenuated connection, and those that do have already been publicly released in the JFK Act collection.”

Machen’s sworn statement erred in saying members of the group had “a couple of encounters” with Oswald.

In fact, the Warren Commission report found that DRE members came in personal contact with Oswald on five different occasions in August 1963.

Joannides medal Retired CIA officer George Joannides (left) received the Career Intelligence Medal from deputy CIA director Bobby Ray Inman on July 15, 1981.
(Photo credit: CIA)

 

A medal for his service

In the Nov. 7 filing, Machen also disputed the significance of CIA records, released under appellate court order in 2008, that revealed Joannides had received a CIA medal.

In a previous filing, I argued that the previously unknown honor reflected official approval of Joannides’s actions in 1963 and in 1978, when he served as the CIA’s liaison to congressional investigators looking into Kennedy’s murder.

The CIA rejected that claim, saying that the declassified citation of the medal “does not address any specific assignment, rather it speaks in terms of 28 years of [Joannides’s] cumulative service ‘in diverse assignments of increasing responsibility at Headquarters, the domestic field and overseas.”

The specific reasons why Joannides was honored remain secret, even 50 years after the fact. The CIA has asserted in previous federal court filings that a five-page 1981 memo to Joannides’s superiors about the medal cannot be made public — for reasons of “national security.”

Chuck S-

Yes, Jeff Morley is another dedicated, smart and serious JFKA researcher.  The CIA, beyond debate, did not cooperate with the WC or HSCA investigations, and in fact engaged in obfuscation. 

If a CIA hit team was dispatched from Miami to Dallas, rogue or otherwise, I contend they must have worked with LHO. 

LHO was involved enough that somebody wanted him dead post-JFKA, and also many witnesses saw shots fired from the TBSD, in which LHO worked, and also in which nobody saw LHO at the time of the gunshots.  

LHO's behavior post-JFKA strikes me as someone who is running, and that means he is guilty or had deduced he was a patsy. I suspect the latter. 

Side note: One thing is you can't have it is both ways. "LHP was totally innocent, but was also running to the Texas Theater to meet a co-conspirator." That doesn't make sense. If LHO was in fact trying to meet a ride, getaway man or contact at the TT, then he must have been a party, unwitting even, to the JFKA.  That also meant co-conspirators knew how to tip off the DPD as to LHO's location. 

My guess is LHO was simply trying to hide in a dark theater, and wait until dark. The best, bad option. His brains may have been fried at the point. 

 

 

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I believe LHO was just listening to and obeying his handler when his handler told him to go to the Texas Theatre and he (LHO) went there as instructed.  I believe LHO had a handler before he " defected" to the USSR. So, for many years , LHO was used to taking such guidance from a handler.

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11 hours ago, Chuck Schwartz said:

I believe LHO was just listening to and obeying his handler when his handler told him to go to the Texas Theatre and he (LHO) went there as instructed.  I believe LHO had a handler before he " defected" to the USSR. So, for many years , LHO was used to taking such guidance from a handler.

And that does not mean he was part of a CIA hit team. 

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