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Was Bugliosi an intelligence asset?


Robert Burrows
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26 minutes ago, Pete Mellor said:

Sandy, your 'ello love' greeting sounds very northern England, not a 'come on', just normal alternative to hello, so your 'hi' reply was about right.

Thanks Pete. I'll try to wrap this up, but what if a GUY greets a girl by saying "hello love?" Back then, in the 1970s. Would that have been okay?

Also, do American lose their accents when they sing? I'd love to hear both your and Ray's experience with this.

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Bugliosi won 103 out of 104 prosecutions, if my memory serves.  The question is did he do it in the same manner that he wrote his Kennedy book?  That book makes one want to go back and rethink what he did with Charlie Manson.  Don't get me wrong.  I am not making a case for Manson.  I am questioning Bugliosi's methods.  

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On 11/17/2021 at 10:27 PM, Pamela Brown said:

I also consider John Lennon's death an assassination...

Considering that:

President Reagan proposed the largest peacetime military build-up in US history, 180 billion dollar expansion over a six year period. The build-up included the B-1 bomber, the B-2 stealth bomber and an array of conventional weapons programs.

https://www.historycentral.com/Today/MilitaryBuildUp.html

It had been only 17 years since the JFK assassination when Ronald Reagan became president in January of 1981. Many of the forces that orchestrated the coup of 1963 were still in power as of January 1981. Why would these forces have hesitated to permanently remove "peacenik" John Lennon from the scene. They had successfully removed a President from power using murder. Compared to a President, a Beatle was easily pickings.

 

 

Edited by Robert Burrows
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On 11/17/2021 at 10:27 PM, Pamela Brown said:

I also consider John Lennon's death an assassination...

While I'm definitely not a lone nutter on the JFK assassination, I don't believe that Lennon was assassinated by the powers that be.  By 1980, I don't see that he was a serious threat.  He had pretty much settled down being a homebody and a parent.

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11 hours ago, Sandy Larsen said:

Thanks Pete. I'll try to wrap this up, but what if a GUY greets a girl by saying "hello love?" Back then, in the 1970s. Would that have been okay?

Also, do American lose their accents when they sing? I'd love to hear both your and Ray's experience with this.

I would think "hello love" would be to a girl that you knew, rather than to a stranger.  Love could also be replaced with "dear" or "pet".  These terms of endearment were very prevalent back then, perhaps not as common today.

Do Americans lose their accents when they sing?  Not to my ears.  Sinatra, Presley, Dylan, Springsteen etc.  & I love singers like John Prine & Lucinda Williams & Leslie Feist (yes I know she's Canadian) & thousands of other American artists singing with many regional accents.  It's us Brits that seem to lose their accents when singing, Mick Jagger being a prime example. 

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41 minutes ago, Dan Rice said:

While I'm definitely not a lone nutter on the JFK assassination, I don't believe that Lennon was assassinated by the powers that be.  By 1980, I don't see that he was a serious threat.  He had pretty much settled down being a homebody and a parent.

I thought the same Dan, until I learned of Chapman's background, his world wide travels on a very low security guards income, the false MSM story of him being a disgruntled Beatles fan, the mysterious stop over in Chicago for three days when travelling from Hawaii to New York, when his flight ticket found in his NY hotel room just showed a direct Hawaii-NY flight, & what's all the "John Lennon must die, says the Catcher in the Rye" chants about?  Shades of Sirhan's "RFK must die."  A professor of psychiatry examined Chapman and declared that "he might have been acting in response to a 'command hallucination' the day John Lennon was killed.  When the cops arrive at the Dakota Chapman is strolling up and down reading his paperback copy of 'The Catcher in the Rye'.  After arrest he states that he didn't want to hurt anybody.  

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1 hour ago, Pete Mellor said:

I thought the same Dan, until I learned of Chapman's background, his world wide travels on a very low security guards income, the false MSM story of him being a disgruntled Beatles fan, the mysterious stop over in Chicago for three days when travelling from Hawaii to New York, when his flight ticket found in his NY hotel room just showed a direct Hawaii-NY flight, & what's all the "John Lennon must die, says the Catcher in the Rye" chants about?  Shades of Sirhan's "RFK must die."  A professor of psychiatry examined Chapman and declared that "he might have been acting in response to a 'command hallucination' the day John Lennon was killed.  When the cops arrive at the Dakota Chapman is strolling up and down reading his paperback copy of 'The Catcher in the Rye'.  After arrest he states that he didn't want to hurt anybody.  

Shades of Sirhan indeed, a "command hallucination".  Never heard it described that way before but likely an appropriate term for his actions as well per the psychiatrists and psychoanalysts that evaluated him personally.

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3 hours ago, Pete Mellor said:

I thought the same Dan, until I learned of Chapman's background, his world wide travels on a very low security guards income, the false MSM story of him being a disgruntled Beatles fan, the mysterious stop over in Chicago for three days when travelling from Hawaii to New York, when his flight ticket found in his NY hotel room just showed a direct Hawaii-NY flight, & what's all the "John Lennon must die, says the Catcher in the Rye" chants about?  Shades of Sirhan's "RFK must die."  A professor of psychiatry examined Chapman and declared that "he might have been acting in response to a 'command hallucination' the day John Lennon was killed.  When the cops arrive at the Dakota Chapman is strolling up and down reading his paperback copy of 'The Catcher in the Rye'.  After arrest he states that he didn't want to hurt anybody.  

Speaking of Lennon . . .  with Clapton and Keith Richards . . .  I remember the day the music died.  No disrespect to Buddy Holly or Don Mclean intended.

 

Edited by Ron Bulman
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19 hours ago, Robert Burrows said:

Considering that:

President Reagan proposed the largest peacetime military build-up in US history, 180 billion dollar expansion over a six year period. The build-up included the B-1 bomber, the B-2 stealth bomber and an array of conventional weapons programs.

https://www.historycentral.com/Today/MilitaryBuildUp.html

It had been only 17 years since the JFK assassination when Ronald Reagan became president in January of 1981. Many of the forces that orchestrated the coup of 1963 were still in power as of January 1981. Why would these forces have hesitated to permanently remove "peacenik" John Lennon from the scene. They had successfully removed a President from power using murder. Compared to a President, a Beatle was easily pickings.

 

 

"The simple truth is that you can get away with anything, in government. That covers almost all the evils of the time. Once in, nobody, apparently, can turn you out. The People, as ever (I spell it "Sheeple"), will stand anything."

-W. R. Anderson in his column Round About Radio, published in London 1945.

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On 11/18/2021 at 5:56 AM, Ray Mitcham said:

As do I, and many others as well, Pamela. 

(By the way tried to contact you but got the report you don't accept messages.)

I don't message on FB except for close friends and family. You can message me here on the EF if you wish.

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16 hours ago, Dan Rice said:

While I'm definitely not a lone nutter on the JFK assassination, I don't believe that Lennon was assassinated by the powers that be.  By 1980, I don't see that he was a serious threat.  He had pretty much settled down being a homebody and a parent.

That is an understandable position. It is my thinking that he had alienated some insiders and had to go.

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23 hours ago, Robert Burrows said:

Considering that:

President Reagan proposed the largest peacetime military build-up in US history, 180 billion dollar expansion over a six year period. The build-up included the B-1 bomber, the B-2 stealth bomber and an array of conventional weapons programs.

https://www.historycentral.com/Today/MilitaryBuildUp.html

It had been only 17 years since the JFK assassination when Ronald Reagan became president in January of 1981. Many of the forces that orchestrated the coup of 1963 were still in power as of January 1981. Why would these forces have hesitated to permanently remove "peacenik" John Lennon from the scene. They had successfully removed a President from power using murder. Compared to a President, a Beatle was easily pickings.

 

 

They weren't the insiders Lennon had outraged...

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On 11/19/2021 at 6:04 AM, Pete Mellor said:

Yeah, I'm with you & Ray.  Read Fenton Bresler's book years back & smelled an MK/Ultra rat....with possibly a CIA doorman.

I think there may be yet another possibility, one that may link what happened to John Lennon to what happened to the Kennedys...

Edited by Pamela Brown
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