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Video --- JFK: A President Betrayed


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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/2/2022 at 6:56 AM, Gil Jesus said:

For those who haven't seen it. Narrated by Morgan Freeman.

https://gil-jesus.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/JFK_-A-President-Betrayed.mp4

To Gil Jesus:  This is a wonderful film.  I first saw it-- with JFK researcher Tyler Newcomb (son of Fred Newcomb) --when it was in the theater in Westwood Village, Los Angeles, the "college town" of UCLA.  I'm glad to see it now available on the Internet, and I highly recommend it.   Everyone has their own path of discovery about the truth about Vietnam, and what that was all about.  I remember my own path, and it began around December 1963, with several hours with Raymond J. Marcus, and his introduction (to me) of a (relatively) obscure magazine -- published monthly  --called The Minority of One, edited by M. S. Arnoni.  As a 1962 graduate of the School of Engineering Physics at Cornell, my first job was connected with Project Apollo at the Space and Information Systems Division ("S & I D") of North American Aviation in Downey, California. Ray was one of the earliest critics of the Warren Report; politically, he was "left of center," and his political interests went back to three political cases: the Alger Hiss case, the Rosenberg Case and then the JFK case. I knew nothing about either the Hiss Case or the Rosenberg case; and I spent many hours at the UCLA Library educating myself.

On the subject of Vietnam,  I discovered --at the UCLA Library --what (to this day) I consider the equivalent of the "seventh wonder of the world": the New York Times Index.  About the size of the Manhattan telephone directory (and set in very small font type), everything the Times had published that year was listed by subject, and --under any subject --was arranged chronologically.  Under "Vietnam," the entries were arranged chronologically.  Immediately, it was obvious that while the entries under "Vietnam" --in 1960 to 1963 --occupied about one or two column inches.  The entries, starting in 1965 grew dramatically in size, and literally exploded in 1966, and beyond.  It was a compressed version of the NY Times, for an entire year.  That was how -- originally -- I "experienced" the escalation of the Vietnam War.

I had another experience about that time.  As an employee on Project Apollo, I had to sign up for the draft, but was provided an exception related to Project Apollo.  After I was registered as a UCLA graduate student, my status changed.  No longer did I have a DOD exemption.  When I was standing in line, some military officer viewed me contemptuously and, as if this were some kind of joke, said, "Yep, we're going to send you to Vietnam, and you're going to come back in a body bag!" 

This was around the time that many became conscientious objectors, or simply went to Canada.  I may have more to say. . . another time,  DSL

 

Edited by David Lifton
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/11/2022 at 12:11 PM, David Lifton said:

To Gil Jesus:  This is a wonderful film.  I first saw it-- with JFK researcher Tyler Newcomb (son of Fred Newcomb) --when it was in the theater in Westwood Village, Los Angeles, the "college town" of UCLA.  I'm glad to see it now available on the Internet, and I highly recommend it.   Everyone has their own path of discovery about the truth about Vietnam, and what that was all about.  I remember my own path, and it began around December 1963, with several hours with Raymond J. Marcus, and his introduction (to me) of a (relatively) obscure magazine -- published monthly  --called The Minority of One, edited by M. S. Arnoni.  As a 1962 graduate of the School of Engineering Physics at Cornell, my first job was connected with Project Apollo at the Space and Information Systems Division ("S & I D") of North American Aviation in Downey, California. Ray was one of the earliest critics of the Warren Report; politically, he was "left of center," and his political interests went back to three political cases: the Alger Hiss case, the Rosenberg Case and then the JFK case. I knew nothing about either the Hiss Case or the Rosenberg case; and I spent many hours at the UCLA Library educating myself.

On the subject of Vietnam,  I discovered --at the UCLA Library --what (to this day) I consider the equivalent of the "seventh wonder of the world": the New York Times Index.  About the size of the Manhattan telephone directory (and set in very small font type), everything the Times had published that year was listed by subject, and --under any subject --was arranged chronologically.  Under "Vietnam," the entries were arranged chronologically.  Immediately, it was obvious that while the entries under "Vietnam" --in 1960 to 1963 --occupied about one or two column inches.  The entries, starting in 1965 grew dramatically in size, and literally exploded in 1966, and beyond.  It was a compressed version of the NY Times, for an entire year.  That was how -- originally -- I "experienced" the escalation of the Vietnam War.

I had another experience about that time.  As an employee on Project Apollo, I had to sign up for the draft, but was provided an exception related to Project Apollo.  After I was registered as a UCLA graduate student, my status changed.  No longer did I have a DOD exemption.  When I was standing in line, some military officer viewed me contemptuously and, as if this were some kind of joke, said, "Yep, we're going to send you to Vietnam, and you're going to come back in a body bag!" 

This was around the time that many became conscientious objectors, or simply went to Canada.  I may have more to say. . . another time,  DSL

 

A lot of people don't understand the WHY of it, how Kennedy's policies were opposed by the military, the State Department and the Department of Justice. It got so bad that he had to use his brother, the only one he could trust, to oversee the CIA and to act as a "back channel" in dealing with the Russians in addition to his own responsibilities at Justice. The back channel especially caused angst among seasoned diplomats in the sense that the Kennedys were circumventing the established order of having government agencies give input. The Kennedys were seen as naive and inexperienced and no one knew what secret deals were being made. On top of all of these foreign policy problems, he was facing domestic problems with the growing Civil Rights movement and resistance to it from extremists in the South. The center of that anti-Kennedy extremism was Dallas, Texas. Many felt the President was weak and didn't know what he was doing. Others felt that his policies were a threat to the security of the country.

I'm in the process of compiling a video from different sources I hope will open some people's eyes.

Thanks for your input, Dave. It was good to hear from you after all these years.

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