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Video: Destroying the "jet effect"


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Fluids, like bullets, travel in straight lines. In order for blood and brains to exhaust from a hole at the right rear of JFK's skull and land on the driver's side taillight and onto officer Hargis who was in that vicinity during the headshot(s) interval on Elm Street, the shot creating the hole must have originated in a straight line (with the two points defining it being the driver's side taillight/Hargis and the hole at the back of JFK's head).  That line points toward the GK.  In order for the hole at the back of JFK's head to "point" toward the driver's side taillight/Hargis at the time both were spattered with gore, his head had to have been turned toward the GK at the time the bullet struck.  The integrity of the Zfilm is irretrievably lost because it does not capture the necessary orientation of JFK's head.  These are facts that should be considered in any conversation about the direction from which bullets entered JFK's head on Elm Street. Like many in the Forum, I've been trying to make some sort of meaningful contribution to the understanding of "what happened" on Elm Street and until the facts I've described can be integrated into that understanding, it is incomplete and inadequate. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

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8 hours ago, Steven Kossor said:

Fluids, like bullets, travel in straight lines. In order for blood and brains to exhaust from a hole at the right rear of JFK's skull and land on the driver's side taillight and onto officer Hargis who was in that vicinity during the headshot(s) interval on Elm Street, the shot creating the hole must have originated in a straight line (with the two points defining it being the driver's side taillight/Hargis and the hole at the back of JFK's head).  That line points toward the GK.  In order for the hole at the back of JFK's head to "point" toward the driver's side taillight/Hargis at the time both were spattered with gore, his head had to have been turned toward the GK at the time the bullet struck.  The integrity of the Zfilm is irretrievably lost because it does not capture the necessary orientation of JFK's head.  These are facts that should be considered in any conversation about the direction from which bullets entered JFK's head on Elm Street. Like many in the Forum, I've been trying to make some sort of meaningful contribution to the understanding of "what happened" on Elm Street and until the facts I've described can be integrated into that understanding, it is incomplete and inadequate. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Steven,

Sticking with your story sounds good to me.  A high-powered rifle bullet creates hydrostatic shock in a liquid or semi-liquid material such as brain tissue.  This hydrostatic shock will create a cone of force from pressure thousands of pounds per square inch.  This in turn will move in the direction the bullet came from exiting the skull in line with that bullet.  Your idea of not seeing Kennedy look toward the Grassy Knoll is sound.  One might argue a shot from the Triple Underpass, but one would have to fight about the notion of a train being there at the time of the assassination.

This is what the testimony of the witnesses' state regardless of what is shown on the Z film.  The Z film is a fraud as demonstrated by Andrej Stancak.  His photo/film frame showing the black patch indicates that Kennedy was shot prior to Z frame 313.  You can see the black patch as early as coming from behind the Stemmons sign which is around Z 225 or so.  You can see earlier in the Betzner photo the black patch.   

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11 hours ago, Steven Kossor said:

Fluids, like bullets, travel in straight lines. In order for blood and brains to exhaust from a hole at the right rear of JFK's skull and land on the driver's side taillight and onto officer Hargis who was in that vicinity during the headshot(s) interval on Elm Street, the shot creating the hole must have originated in a straight line (with the two points defining it being the driver's side taillight/Hargis and the hole at the back of JFK's head).  That line points toward the GK.  In order for the hole at the back of JFK's head to "point" toward the driver's side taillight/Hargis at the time both were spattered with gore, his head had to have been turned toward the GK at the time the bullet struck.  The integrity of the Zfilm is irretrievably lost because it does not capture the necessary orientation of JFK's head.  These are facts that should be considered in any conversation about the direction from which bullets entered JFK's head on Elm Street. Like many in the Forum, I've been trying to make some sort of meaningful contribution to the understanding of "what happened" on Elm Street and until the facts I've described can be integrated into that understanding, it is incomplete and inadequate. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Blood spatter analysis is among the fields on which I've done some reading. And it's a misnomer to think the direction of blood spatter from a head tells you the precise location of a shooter. The blood can explode back towards the shooter and forwards in the direction of the bullet if there's an exit. But the back spatter in particular is related to the angle of impact. It is at a right angle to the surface that is struck. In JFK's case, his head was leaning forward and to its left, and the blood exploded upwards from the supposed exit location. This suggests the bullet struck him at this supposed exit. From what I can gather it is not conclusive if it came from in front or from behind. As far as Hargis, he insisted over and over that the blood cloud went up in the air and that he drove through it. This is consistent with what is shown in the film. 

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I thought Hargis said originally that it seemed to him as though he, himself, had been hit because the gore struck him with such force.  I didn't realize that he also said that the blood/gore "went up into the air" and that he "drove through it," which is a distinctly different account of what he experienced.  Did he say both things and if so, which was his first account?  As in the case of Malcolm Perry and every other witness to an event, it makes sense to give more weight to the earliest statement about what was experienced than any later statements. The blood/gore was also deposited in the vicinity of the driver's side taillight, so it seems pretty clear that the gore didn't just go up into the air, but that a goodly portion of it also projected backward and to the left.  Maybe a 2nd or 3rd head shot produced that "cloud" of mist that Dino Brugioni of NPIC and others have described, but all of the reports taken together seem to indicate that a "cone" of gore was sprayed behind and to JFK's left, not just the mist erupting into the air.

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Also, this isn't really a blood "spatter" scenario.  One of the bullets that struck JFK's head seems to have entered above his right eye and fragmented inside his skull, which would have produced an enormous over-pressurization scenario that could have resulted in the explosion of his head.  I think the shot from the GK coming a split second later averted that gruesome outcome by creating a hole at the right rear of JFK's skull, through which the highly pressurized contents of his head was exhausted so that it struck Hargis with sufficient force for him to think that he might have been hit himself.  A third shot or fourth shot may have struck the head and back from the rear but without accounting for the trail of "flecks" shown on Xrays inside JFK's head that tracked an entry in the right forehead, and the hole at the right rear of his head, any analysis of what happened on Elm Street is deficient.

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Steven Kossor said:

I thought Hargis said originally that it seemed to him as though he, himself, had been hit because the gore struck him with such force.  I didn't realize that he also said that the blood/gore "went up into the air" and that he "drove through it," which is a distinctly different account of what he experienced.  Did he say both things and if so, which was his first account?  As in the case of Malcolm Perry and every other witness to an event, it makes sense to give more weight to the earliest statement about what was experienced than any later statements. The blood/gore was also deposited in the vicinity of the driver's side taillight, so it seems pretty clear that the gore didn't just go up into the air, but that a goodly portion of it also projected backward and to the left.  Maybe a 2nd or 3rd head shot produced that "cloud" of mist that Dino Brugioni of NPIC and others have described, but all of the reports taken together seem to indicate that a "cone" of gore was sprayed behind and to JFK's left, not just the mist erupting into the air.

Here's what Hargis had to say in the 60's.

From patspeer.com, Chapter 5b:

Bobby W. Hargis rode to the right of Martin and to the left of Mrs. Kennedy. (Note: as so many use Hargis' words to support that the fatal bullet exploded from the back of Kennedy's head, or that the limo stopped on Elm Street, I have highlighted quotes touching upon these issues.) (11-22-63 article in the Dallas Times-Herald. Note: in 1995 Hargis would tell researchers Ian Griggs and Mark Oakes that he didn't write this article and that it must have been based on a conversation he'd had with a reporter in a hallway) “About halfway down between Houston and the underpass I heard the first shot. It sounded like a real loud firecracker. When I heard the sound, the first thing I thought about was a gunshot. I looked around and about then Governor Connally turned around and looked at the President with a real surprised look on his face…The President bent over to hear what the Governor had to say. When he raised back up was when the President got shot…I felt blood hit me in the face and the Presidential car stopped almost immediately after that…I racked (parked) my motorcycle and jumped off. I ran to the North side of Elm to see if I could find where the bullets were coming from. I don’t think the President was hit with the first shot… I felt that the Governor was shot first." (Undated typescript of interview with Hargis found within the Dallas-Times-Herald's photograph collection, as reported by Richard Trask in Pictures of the Pain, 1994. This is almost certainly the basis for the 11-22 article) "I felt blood hit me in the face, and the presidential car stopped almost immediately after that and stayed stopped about half a second, then took off at a high rate of speed. I racked my cycle and jumped off. I ran to the north side of Elm Street to see if I could find where the bullets came from. I don't think the President got hit with the first shot, but I don't know for sure. When I heard the first shot, it looked like he bent over. I feel that the Governor was shot first. I could be wrong. Right after the first shot, I was trying to look and see if the President got shot. When I saw the look on Connally's face, I knew somebody was shooting at the car...The fatal bullet struck the President in the right side of the head. I noticed the people in the Texas School Book Depository were looking up to see the top. I didn't know if the President stopped under the triple underpass or not. I didn't know for sure if the shots had come from the Book Depository. I thought they might have come from the trestle." (11-23-63 UPI article found in the Fresno Bee) “I saw flesh flying after the shot, and the president’s hair flew up,” Hargis said, “I knew he was dead.” (11-23-63 article in the Houston Post) "A Dallas motorcycle officer who was riding two feet from the presidential car described to the Houston Post Friday what he saw when a sniper fired the shots that killed President Kennedy and wounded Gov. John B. Connally. 'When the first rifle bullet spewed into the open limousine,' said Patrolman J.H. Hargis, 'The President bent forward in the car.' Hargis, a nine-year veteran of the force, said the first shot hit the governor. 'Then immediately after that,' Hargis said, 'the second shot was fired, striking the President in the right side of the head.' The Secret Service man driving the car immediately picked up the phone inside the car and said "Let's go to the nearest hospital.' Hargis said he jumped off his motorcycle and began a search of the building from which the shots were fired. 'I knew it was high and from the right. I looked for any sign of activity in the windows, but I didn't see anybody.'" (11-24-63 article in the New York Sunday News) "We turned left onto Elm St. off Houston, about a half block from where it happened. I was right alongside the rear fender on the left side of the President's car, near Mrs. Kennedy. When I heard the first explosion, I knew it was a shot. I thought that Gov. Connally had been hit when I saw him turn toward the President with a real surprised look. The President then looked like he was bent over or that he was leaning toward the Governor, talking to him. As the President straightened back up, Mrs. Kennedy turned toward him, and that was when he got hit in the side of his head, spinning it around. I was splattered with blood. Then I felt something hit me. It could have been concrete or something, but I thought at first I might have been hit. Then I saw the limousine stop, and I parked my motorcycle at the side of the road, got off and drew my gun. Then this Secret Service agent (in the President's car) got his wits about him and they took off. The motorcycle officer on the right side of the car was Jim Chaney. He immediately went forward and announced to the chief that the President had been shot."

(4-3-64 testimony before the Warren Commission, 6H293-296): “I was next to Mrs. Kennedy when I heard the first shot, and at that time the President bent over, and Governor Connally turned around. He was sitting directly in front of him, and (had) a real shocked and surprised expression on his face…I thought Governor Connally had been shot first, but it looked like the President was bending over to hear what he had to say, and I thought to myself then that Governor Connally, the Governor had been hit, and then as the President raised back up like that the shot that killed him hit him.” (When asked about the blood) "when President Kennedy straightened back up in the car the bullet him in the head, the one that killed him and it seemed like his head exploded, and I was splattered with blood and brain, and kind of bloody water, It wasn't really blood. And at that time the Presidential car slowed down. I heard somebody say 'Get going' or 'get going.'" (When asked about the source of the shots) "Well, at the time it sounded like the shots were right next to me. There wasn't any way in the world I could tell where they were coming from, but at the time there was something in my head that said that they probably could have been coming from the railroad overpass, because I thought since I had got splattered, with blood--I was Just a little back and left of--just a little bit back and left of Mrs. Kennedy, but I didn't know. I had a feeling that it might have been from the Texas Book Depository, and these two places was the primary place that could have been shot from." (8-7-68 interview with Tom Bethel and Al Oser, investigators working on behalf New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, NARA #180-10096-10005) (When discussing how he could have been sprayed with blood, if the shot came from behind) "Well, that right there is what I've wondered about all along, but see there's ah -- you've got to take into consideration we were moving at the time, and when he got hit all that stuff went like this, and of course I run through it." (When discussing his interpretation of the direction of the shots) "Well, like I say, being that we know that the shot came from the School Book Depository, right then it was kind of hard to say what run through your mind. You know you pick up these little things. You don't know why you do it. You don't know why you do 'em, you just do 'em. It's just kind of instinct. But I had in my mind the shots you couldn't tell where they was coming, but it seemed like the motion of the President's head or his body and the splatter had hit me, it seemed like both the locations needed investigating, and that's why I investigated them. But you couldn't tell, there was -- it looked like a million windows on the Book Depository.You couldn't tell exactly if there was anyone in there with a gun." (When asked if the shots could have come from anywhere) "Uh huh. That's correct." (When asked if he saw the President's head jerk as a response to a bullet's impact) "Yes. Uh huh...To the left forward. Kind of that way...I couldn't see what part of it got hit...If he'd got hit in the rear, I'd have been able to see it. All I saw was just a splash come out on the other side."

Edited by Pat Speer
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Thanks always to Pat for bringing thoughtful and helpful information to the conversation.  Tink's latest book Last Second in Dallas has a diagram showing how blood and gore went forward (as far as the hood of the limo and onto the occupants), and also backward (onto the hood of the Queen Mary), and also onto the driver's side taillight area and officer Hargis, so there seems to be evidence of bullet strikes from three different directions based on the separate "debris fields" that were created.  What amazes me most is how any physician could possibly have mistaken a body with such awful head wounds as being alive and a legitimate candidate for endotracheal intubation.  He didn't need respiratory assistance upon arrival at Parkland because he was DOA (as Kemp Clark admitted years later), and Carrico's inept placement of an endotracheal tube (the inflatable cuff was above the throat wound so it could not seal the trachea) seems to have misled Perry and other doctors to think that JFK was still alive.  It seems that they realized their error in the midst of performing a surgical tracheotomy, and then focused only on Carrico's endotracheal tracheotomy in the 2:15 press conference.  It does look like Hargis is reporting two different experiences in his report of what happened on Elm Street -- that he "drove through" a cloud, and that he was "hit by" blood and gore -- his seemingly different accounts are compatible with the physical evidence of at least two, if not three, head impacts during that "last second in Dallas" -- one producing a "cloud" that he drove through and one producing a "splash" that hit him more forcefully.

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Posted (edited)

1. The human skull is not a watermelon.

2. The bullet did not exit the front of JFK's face.

3. Below is a picture of a soldier killed by a 6.5 Carcano bullet and a  from a similar distance that JFK's head exploded and with an entry shot in the back and an exit on the top of the skull.  The skull does not blow up.

image.png.cf2ba54ab484b3f305ac272febdb2347.png

4. JFK was hit from the right side, it was a tangential shot, the bullet entering the temporal region above his ear with the bullet exiting the top of his head.  You can see bone, skull, bullet, etc... flying towards S. Elm on the zFilm.

You can clearly see an entry hole above of JFK's ear in this autopsy picture. --WARNING-- According to Pathologist James C. Jenkins, who was present at the autopsy, the reddish area covering JFK's hair is fatty tissue from the scalp.  Dr. Jenkins is one of three people to handle JFK's brain.  No brain damage to  the brain lobes.  The only damage to the brain in from the back shot to the skull.

image.png.889428ec9efeb23a95cab26c724c8a4a.png

 

Edited by Keyvan Shahrdar
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Posted (edited)

For those who are interested in the so-called "jet effect":

1.  A short while ago, while perusing Amazon, I came across a book published in 1987 by Basic Books.  The author was Luis Alvarez; the book's title,  "ALVAREZ: Adventures of a Physicist". It was Luis Alvarez's autobiography, and the titles of the opening chapters gives one a sense of the very high opinion Alvarez has of himself:

"Prologue: The Hiroshima Mission

ONE:  "Beginnings"

TWO: "Becoming a Physicist"

THREE: Coming into my own"

There is nothing modest about Luis Alvarez.  By his own description, he is a renaissance man, someone who is an "expert on everything" (my quotes). Earthquakes, evolution, the dinosaurs, the deployment of atomic bombs against Japan; and -- finally  -- the JFK assassination.

I ordered this book on a hunch --I knew Alvarez was a defender of the Warren Commission's conclusions; further, that he put the "stamp of authority" on his interpretation of the JFK "head-snap," the "back and to the left" motion as depicted on the Zapruder film; and which was one of the reasons I first got involved in the JFK case.  So I wondered what might in this book.   In a future post, I will lay out the details --more on Alvarez's views, his glorification of Paul Hoch (and his melon experiments), etc.  And, finally, the "jet effect."  Stay tuned.  DSL (5/28/22- 2 AM PDT)

 

Edited by David Lifton
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