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How Oswald was Framed for the Murder of Tippit


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Jack Myers follows up on his original article on the Tippit case.  Please note the alleged transaction at REA about the handgun.  That would have never flown at a trial.  He also goes after Calloway.

 

https://www.kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/how-oswald-was-framed-for-the-murder-of-tippit

Edited by James DiEugenio
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No one wants to comment on part 2, how the heck did Oswald purchase that handgun?

Because it sure does appear he did not.

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4 hours ago, James DiEugenio said:

How the heck did Oswald purchase that handgun?

Because it sure does appear he did not.

The only way you can conclude that Oswald did not purchase (and take possession of) "that handgun" (i.e., S&W Revolver No. V510210) is to totally ignore all the evidence that tells us he did purchase it:

DVP's JFK Archives ---> Lee Harvey Oswald's Revolver

 

Edited by David Von Pein
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Quotes from part 1 of the article:

As for the killer’s escape, only Markham saw him run down the alleyway between E. 10th and Jefferson Boulevard. All other witnesses clearly said the killer ran past the alley and fled west on Jefferson Boulevard.

As the gunman realized Callaway and Guinyard had stepped out and were now blocking his escape route, the young man crossed the street and proceeded south on the west side of Patton.

The FBI later took measurements on Patton Avenue and determined that the gunman had passed by some 55 feet from Callaway and Guinyard at the closest.

They are incorrect in several ways as discussed in Gil Jesus' thread, "A Question of Credibility: Tippit Witnesses Can't Agree," including a misrepresentation of the content of Guinyard's WC testimony.

From Gil's thread:

1. Poe/Jez report: "There were approximately six to eight witnesses, all telling officers that the subject was running west in the alley between Tenth and Jefferson Streets."
2. Barnes' diagram: "W on ally to Crawford left on Crawford to E Jefferson 300 bk."
3. Cimino: "She...stated he had run west on Tenth Street and pointed in the direction of an alley which runs between Tenth Street and Jefferson off Patton Street."

No one corroborated Callaway's story of a fugitive proceeding along the west side of Patton Avenue the entire distance to Jefferson. Patterson & Guinyard both specified the east side.

This stupid cock-up is a dead giveaway that the suborners lost track of details when they devised the imaginary flight path. The orthodox view might save face in this matter by arguing there were two runners, with a pseudo LHO taking WR's blessed route and the actual killer exiting the murder scene via the alley as indicated by the preponderance of evidence, but this is a long row to hoe.

Edited by Michael Kalin
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There seems to be a troubling tendency to embrace the witnesses we agree with and reject the ones we don't. I think the Dallas PD let themselves be steamrolled by the Feds. Oswald should have been too good to be true, but he was handy and was the solution to a mystery the DPD never figured out.

Edited by Evan Marshall
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I have never found any evidence that the FBI went to REA.

Have you Evan, or you Michael?

If this is true, why would they not go there?

Maybe I am wrong.

 

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On 8/19/2023 at 11:07 AM, James DiEugenio said:

 

Jack Myers follows up on his original article on the Tippit case.  Please note the alleged transaction at REA about the handgun.  That would have never flown at a trial.  He also goes after Calloway.

 

https://www.kennedysandking.com/john-f-kennedy-articles/how-oswald-was-framed-for-the-murder-of-tippit

While Michael's points about the alley raise legitimate questions for me I've never read about before, Meyers three articles are the best somewhat concise writing I remember reading on the subject.  While Into the Nightmare is the gold standard on the subject imho, this does it justice and more on this aspect.  

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Thanks Ron.  

And i agree about Joe's book being the long version..

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Concentrating on part 1, here's a quote:

Quote

As Callaway and Guinyard watched, they observed Bill Scoggins hunched over and pressed against the driver’s side fender of his cab. Suddenly, a young white man carrying a pistol came crashing through the hedges. Paying no attention to the cab, the gunman headed south on the east sidewalk of Patton towards where Callaway and Guinyard were standing, wondering what the excitement was all about. Guinyard observed the young man toss what was the fourth of the four spent shells towards the side of Virginia Davis’s apartment.

The purported shortcut across the front yard of the Davis residence and exit through the shrubbery is not a foregone conclusion. Many saw the killer proceed to the corner of Patton & 10th, turn left at this corner, and leave the area via the alley. This means the spent shells eventually discovered by the Davis women were planted by the framers.

As for Guinyard's WC testimony, here's what he told Ball: "He came through there running and knocking empty shells out of his pistol and he had it up just like this with his hand." [7H397]

Note "shells" in the plural -- maybe he saw all four get knocked out, or maybe only two, but his WC testimony contains another more interesting observation that receives scant attention:

Mr. BALL. Were you there when the truck came up that was driven by Benavides?
Mr. GUINYARD. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. He came up right after this?
Mr. GUINYARD. Yes; he came up from the east side---going west.
Mr. BALL. And then what did you do after that?
Mr. GUINYARD. Well, we stood there a while and talked and I called him Donnie, he picked up all them empty hulls that come out of the gun. [7H398]

This causes so many plots to go up in suborned smoke it is typically ignored altogether. When mentioned, it is often poo-pooed as an inscrutable quirk in the record not to be taken seriously or relegated to a footnote by an author who does not want to reckon with the implications. Indeed, it is not easy to gloss over for those who might be willing to try. The stinger is the content of Ball's leading question which Guinyard quickly affirms, betraying the prepackaged nature of the interrogation. The entire session was scripted in advance, with an inept rewrite man slipping in the bit about the truck arriving several minutes after the shooting, and Ball asleep at the wheel.

Flick off the late arrival of the truck if you must, but this simultaneously flicks off the spent shells.

Another quote:

Quote

Callaway went to the patrol car and tried to summon help on the radio, but was unsuccessful. A motorist named T.F. Bowley, who knew how to work the radio, would stop seconds later and summon help. Meanwhile, someone had already picked up Tippit’s service revolver, which had been lying on the street partially beneath his body, and placed it up on the squad car. Domingo Benavides, who worked as a mechanic at Harris Motors, was telling Callaway what he had just witnessed from his pickup truck.

Few attribute the fumbling with the patrol car radio to Callaway. In a 1977 HSCA interview Bowley stated, "The radio of the scout car was on and the Mexican man was attempting to use it to call for help." This man was Benavides. Callaway is usually named as the person who made an improbable second citizen call after the ambulance left the scene (Kimbrough/Shearer #s 954 & 956).

Edited by Michael Kalin
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On 8/23/2023 at 8:20 PM, Michael Kalin said:

Concentrating on part 1, here's a quote:

The purported shortcut across the front yard of the Davis residence and exit through the shrubbery is not a foregone conclusion. Many saw the killer proceed to the corner of Patton & 10th, turn left at this corner, and leave the area via the alley. This means the spent shells eventually discovered by the Davis women were planted by the framers.

As for Guinyard's WC testimony, here's what he told Ball: "He came through there running and knocking empty shells out of his pistol and he had it up just like this with his hand." [7H397]

Note "shells" in the plural -- maybe he saw all four get knocked out, or maybe only two, but his WC testimony contains another more interesting observation that receives scant attention:

Mr. BALL. Were you there when the truck came up that was driven by Benavides?
Mr. GUINYARD. Yes, sir.
Mr. BALL. He came up right after this?
Mr. GUINYARD. Yes; he came up from the east side---going west.
Mr. BALL. And then what did you do after that?
Mr. GUINYARD. Well, we stood there a while and talked and I called him Donnie, he picked up all them empty hulls that come out of the gun. [7H398]

This causes so many plots to go up in suborned smoke it is typically ignored altogether. When mentioned, it is often poo-pooed as an inscrutable quirk in the record not to be taken seriously or relegated to a footnote by an author who does not want to reckon with the implications. Indeed, it is not easy to gloss over for those who might be willing to try. The stinger is the content of Ball's leading question which Guinyard quickly affirms, betraying the prepackaged nature of the interrogation. The entire session was scripted in advance, with an inept rewrite man slipping in the bit about the truck arriving several minutes after the shooting, and Ball asleep at the wheel.

Flick off the late arrival of the truck if you must, but this simultaneously flicks off the spent shells.

Another quote:

Few attribute the fumbling with the patrol car radio to Callaway. In a 1977 HSCA interview Bowley stated, "The radio of the scout car was on and the Mexican man was attempting to use it to call for help." This man was Benavides. Callaway is usually named as the person who made an improbable second citizen call after the ambulance left the scene (Kimbrough/Shearer #s 954 & 956).

 

"The purported shortcut across the front yard of the Davis residence and exit through the shrubbery is not a foregone conclusion. Many saw the killer proceed to the corner of Patton & 10th, turn left at this corner, and leave the area via the alley."

 

Nonsense.

 

No one saw the killer leave the area via the alley.

 

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For me, the problem with the Tippit shooting has always been the ID of the shells as being from an automatic pistol, by DPD Sgt. Gerald Hill.

I have only known two cops in my life, but both knew a lot about guns and ammo (stock in trade after all) and both regarded a crime against a fellow officer as most serious.

Beyond dispute, after viewing the shells found near the Tippit murder, Sgt. Hill got on the police radio and said, "the shells at the scene indicate that the suspect is armed with an automatic .38."

In a 1986 interview, Hill said he knew the shells were .38-caliber shells because he picked one of them up and examined it.

Automatic .38 shells, on the bottom, are imprinted very clearly with the word "auto." 

It defies imagination that a police sergeant would look at an evidence shell at the scene of a brutal murder of a fellow officer, and then get on the police radio describe the shell type exactly wrong.  A murder is serious business, and a murder of fellow officer the most serious of all. 

There are not a myriad of shell types. There is revolver and auto. It is not a bewildering topic taking years to master. 

The Sgt. Hill situation strongly suggests evidence was switched around after the fact.  

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ron Bulman said:

This is Really interesting and informative to scroll through slowly and read regarding the Tippit assassination.  Pictures I've never seen before.

Commission Document 630 - FBI Letter from Director of 26 Mar 1964 w/ Attached Reports (maryferrell.org)

I agree, Ron. It's a very good resource. I discovered the CD630 Tippit document in 2017, and culled my favorite photos from it here:

http://jfk-archives.blogspot.com/2017/04/photos-of-tippit-murder-scene.html

Along similar lines, you might want to also check out CD496 and CD497. Lots of rare photos in those FBI "booklets" too:

http://maryferrell.org / CD496 / Texas School Book Depository (Photos, Floor Plans, & Parking Lots)

http://maryferrell.org / CD497 / Paine & Randle Home (Photos, Floor Plans, Street Diagrams, & Route Map)

Many thanks go out to the Mary Ferrell website for making so many rare documents publicly available for free.

 

Edited by David Von Pein
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4 hours ago, David Von Pein said:

I agree, Ron. It's a very good resource. I discovered the CD630 Tippit document in 2017, and culled my favorite photos from it here:

http://jfk-archives.blogspot.com/2017/04/photos-of-tippit-murder-scene.html

Along similar lines, you might want to also check out CD496 and CD497. Lots of rare photos in those FBI "booklets" too:

http://maryferrell.org / CD496 / Texas School Book Depository (Photos, Floor Plans, & Parking Lots)

http://maryferrell.org / CD497 / Paine & Randle Home (Photos, Floor Plans, Street Diagrams, & Route Map)

Many thanks go out to the Mary Ferrell website for making so many rare documents publicly available for free.

 

Cool photos. Pity they are in black and white. Unless they were taken in color and only published in the WCR in black and white? Wishful thinking maybe.

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16 hours ago, Bill Brown said:

"The purported shortcut across the front yard of the Davis residence and exit through the shrubbery is not a foregone conclusion. Many saw the killer proceed to the corner of Patton & 10th, turn left at this corner, and leave the area via the alley."

 

Nonsense.

 

No one saw the killer leave the area via the alley.

Your quotations are stylistic eyesores -- bold, red, italics. What next -- enlarged font?

Learn how to use the forum's built-in quote facility to cleanse away this ugliness, followed by evidence evaluation and presenting a coherent argument based on carefully researched conclusions.

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