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Dalla Police Mindset


Steve Thomas
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It appears that the Dallas Police in 1963 had a mindset that said a person was guilty until proven innocent. I wonder how this affected the way they went about solving crimes.

Supplementary Investigative Report of Chief Criminal Deputy Sheriff Alan Sweatt:

http://jfkassassination.net/russ/testimony/sweatt.htm

"Shortly after, a DPD officer brought a boy in a sport coat up and said "here is the man that had done the shooting".

FBI Interview with Forgery Detective William Chambers, assigned to question the three tramps:

http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Senat...0179-10312.html

"Once inside Captain Jones' office, Captain Jones told Chambers, "find out which one shot the President.""

WC testimony of Julia Postal:

http://jfkassassination.net/russ/testimony/postal.htm

"well, that is when I first heard Officer Tippit had been shot because some officer came in the box office and used the phone, said, "I think we have got our man on both accounts." "...that officer came out of the theatre and grabbed at the phone and made the call about simultaneously as they were bringing Oswald out."

It's not surprising to me that an Officer would say what Julia Postal heard. Rather than an indication of conspiracy, I think it's an indication of the police mindset.

Steve Thomas

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DPD's mindset is the same mindset as EVERY police force in the world. Yeah, even Al Carrier's! When they think they have their man, they will do ANYTHING to have him go to jail, including perjuries, lies, destroying evidence, making up evidence, forgering evidence, intimidating witnesses, etc. Ask Al, he knows what I am talking about. He knows a lot about his colleagues, but cannot talk.

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  • 1 year later...
DPD's mindset is the same mindset as EVERY police force in the world. Yeah, even Al Carrier's! When they think they have their man, they will do ANYTHING to have him go to jail, including perjuries, lies, destroying evidence, making up evidence, forgering evidence, intimidating witnesses, etc. Ask Al, he knows what I am talking about. He knows a lot about his colleagues, but cannot talk.

having spent two tours in Detroit Homicde, I'm afraid Denis is far from the mark-I worked CSI in the early 70's and honesty and presentation of undoctored evidence was the rule of the day.

I know most people hate cops, but I was involved in several keys cases in Detroit and honesty was always the rule of the day.

cops are people who generally relfect the values of the community they work in-if people are concerned about racist, crooked cops they need to look inward as they rarely brought in from Eastern Europe to patrol the streets of your community.

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DPD's mindset is the same mindset as EVERY police force in the world. Yeah, even Al Carrier's! When they think they have their man, they will do ANYTHING to have him go to jail, including perjuries, lies, destroying evidence, making up evidence, forgering evidence, intimidating witnesses, etc. Ask Al, he knows what I am talking about. He knows a lot about his colleagues, but cannot talk.

having spent two tours in Detroit Homicde, I'm afraid Denis is far from the mark-I worked CSI in the early 70's and honesty and presentation of undoctored evidence was the rule of the day.

Maybe. But it wasn't the rule of the day in Dallas on November 22. Detroit's a long way from Dallas.

I know most people hate cops, but I was involved in several keys cases in Detroit and honesty was always the rule of the day.

cops are people who generally relfect the values of the community they work in-if people are concerned about racist, crooked cops they need to look inward as they rarely brought in from Eastern Europe to patrol the streets of your community.

??????????

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Evan,

cops are people who generally relfect the values of the community they work in-if people are concerned about racist, crooked cops they need to look inward as they rarely brought in from Eastern Europe to patrol the streets of your community.

Welcome to the Forum.

When I read what you posted, I smiled.

My initial post back in 2005 had to do with the police in Dallas.

Here is what someone named Jerry Lawson posted on the Dallas Historical Society Forum page back in September. It had to do with something called, Shotgun Squads in Dallas in the 1960's:

"In the late 60's I was managing the Pizza Inn on West Davis. The manager of the store on South Lancaster got sick one night and I went to cover his shift. When I got there he called me to tell me about the shotgun squad and fill me in on their procedure. Two of them would arrive just after dark and set up behind a piece of plywood in the back dining room with a clear view of the cash register. If someone was robbing me, I was to take two steps back from the register, raise my hands in the air, and loudly say "do you want the change too?". That was the signal for them to fire. Sure enough, right after dark two Dallas police officers walked in the door with shotguns. They were arguing (in jest) about who would get the first shot that night. One of them said "well, you go ahead and take the first shot. You're going to miss anyway and I'll still have to bring him down".

The night was uneventful until my district supervisor walked in the door. He stopped at the cash register, leaned over the counter and started a conversation with me about how I liked working that restaurant. I always thought my superviser was a jerk and a pain in the ass. I thought for just a few seconds about taking two steps back, raising my hands in the air, and asking him if he wanted the change too. Of course I didn't, but he'll never know just how close he came."

Steve Thomas

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Evan,

cops are people who generally relfect the values of the community they work in-if people are concerned about racist, crooked cops they need to look inward as they rarely brought in from Eastern Europe to patrol the streets of your community.

Welcome to the Forum.

When I read what you posted, I smiled.

My initial post back in 2005 had to do with the police in Dallas.

Here is what someone named Jerry Lawson posted on the Dallas Historical Society Forum page back in September. It had to do with something called, Shotgun Squads in Dallas in the 1960's:

"In the late 60's I was managing the Pizza Inn on West Davis. The manager of the store on South Lancaster got sick one night and I went to cover his shift. When I got there he called me to tell me about the shotgun squad and fill me in on their procedure. Two of them would arrive just after dark and set up behind a piece of plywood in the back dining room with a clear view of the cash register. If someone was robbing me, I was to take two steps back from the register, raise my hands in the air, and loudly say "do you want the change too?". That was the signal for them to fire. Sure enough, right after dark two Dallas police officers walked in the door with shotguns. They were arguing (in jest) about who would get the first shot that night. One of them said "well, you go ahead and take the first shot. You're going to miss anyway and I'll still have to bring him down".

The night was uneventful until my district supervisor walked in the door. He stopped at the cash register, leaned over the counter and started a conversation with me about how I liked working that restaurant. I always thought my superviser was a jerk and a pain in the ass. I thought for just a few seconds about taking two steps back, raising my hands in the air, and asking him if he wanted the change too. Of course I didn't, but he'll never know just how close he came."

Steve Thomas

when I was assigned to the Tac Unit in the early 70's we worked some stakeouts-in Motown atleast, it was SOP for holdup men to shoot the clerk whether they resisted or not, so it was not unusual for shoot outs to occur-cops like to live too.

Edited by Evan Marshall
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