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Mary Pinchot Meyer


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To Robert Howard:

Thank you for linking WILLIAM BUNDY to the counter intelligence procedures present in the Kennedy era, MCGEORGE BUNDY to CORD MEYER and DESMOND FITZGERALD then active.

I am a strong MARK LANE and FLETCHER PROUTY theorist and the emphasis on WILLIAM BUNDY, MCGEORGE BUNDY and the CIA National Security Council links the JFK assassination to

SKUNK and BONES

David Kaiser, in his great book, American Tragedy: Kennedy, Johnson, and the Origins of the Vietnam War (2000), points out that LBJ used the Bundy's brothers to change JFK's policy on Vietnam. It was this policy, rather than any other, that LBJ changed after he gained power.

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Yes, Mary had to go as she knew [almost certainly] or suspected [for sure] the real persons behind the assassination. Her diary would have likely contained much of that and likely other things we don't even have hints of. It and she had to go. So many others too. Has anyone ever tried a FOIA on documents tracking fate of her diary or about her pre and post assassination? I'd even go so far as to say those that kept a watch on Mary also had kept a watch on Monroe and had done away with her in an early attempt to send a signal to the Kennedy brothers about who was really in control.

I have been given the name of the person who killed Mary. It appears in Leo Damore's unpublished manuscript on the case. Damore argues that he was told the name of the person by a CIA informant. Leo Damore committed suicide in October 1995 and his book on Meyer was never published. My contact has the manuscript and is attempting to finish it (he also has the manuscript of another journalist who was frightened off the case).

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Guest John Gillespie

Is it a coincidence that the two women closest to JFK died in the years following his assassination. Did JFK tell Mary Meyer and Florence Smith something that was not good for their health?

_______________________________

...and Marilyn Monroe makes three, though prior to the assassinatin.

JG

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Congratulations for the breakthrough, John --- Have to buy you a stout, ale or lager, soon.

How much can you tell us about the Leo Demore's scenario?

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John, Can you just say whether it is a known name - or just an unknown killer for one? Glad someone is working on this. One can [and they did] delete, alter and create new documents and even evidence over the crime in Dallas, but they felt there was only one way to deal with the 'problem' of Mary P. Where can one find the details on the suicide of of Damore? When I hear suicide of someone connected in any way with these things I always wonder if it was a murder made to look like a suicide - as so many were. Your saying that yet another journalist was frightened off makes me wonder even more about the suicide - and what danger Mary and JFKs other lovers presented to those who killed him - even after his death. We may only be left speculating. It could only be they suspected they know who was involved, after the fact. It could be that JFK had some hints who was out to get him. It could be other things we can't imagine JFK knew or planned to do or did.

According to Leo Damore, the hit was carried out by William L. Mitchell. He was an army lieutenant who actually gave evidence for the prosecution at the trial of Raymond Crump. According to Damore, Mitchell confessed to the crime after he caught up with him on 30th March, 1993. Mitchell was listed in the Department of Defense Directory in 1964. However, further research revealed that this was a CIA cover name and the army denies all knowledge of him.

It is almost certain that Leo Damore did kill himself. However, the background to why he became so depressed is highly significant. It was a journey that several investigative journalists have taken.

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Guest John Gillespie
The Meyer murder scene.

James

James,

A picture is worth 1,000 words.

I think it's been pointed out before - an awful lot of suits.

- lee

_________________________________________

James and Lee,

You guys are phenomenal. Yeah, lots of suits under the trench coats. I've read the Meyer bio ("A Very Private Woman: The Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer") by Nina Burleigh, one of our best writers. Burleigh writes about what life was like for Meyer and other women in that time and place, to include the Washington power & social scene. It's a good read because Burleigh is a very good writer and journalist. She covers the Crump trial in detail, for example. For our purposes though, the Leary book is much more revealing.

Remember how Leary and G. Gordon Liddy actually became pals years ago after Liddy had busted Leary at one of T.L.'s parties? They went on to become mutual foils, appearing on stage in debates at campuses and other venues. I would like to have Liddy on these pages and try to find out what Mr. Leary must have told him regarding Meyer.

Having a ball this AM...thanks, guys (say, James, my family is trying to find a circa 1940s pic of my deceased Uncle Bob).

Regards,

JG

Edited by John Gillespie
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John, Can you just say whether it is a known name - or just an unknown killer for one? Glad someone is working on this. One can [and they did] delete, alter and create new documents and even evidence over the crime in Dallas, but they felt there was only one way to deal with the 'problem' of Mary P. Where can one find the details on the suicide of of Damore? When I hear suicide of someone connected in any way with these things I always wonder if it was a murder made to look like a suicide - as so many were. Your saying that yet another journalist was frightened off makes me wonder even more about the suicide - and what danger Mary and JFKs other lovers presented to those who killed him - even after his death. We may only be left speculating. It could only be they suspected they know who was involved, after the fact. It could be that JFK had some hints who was out to get him. It could be other things we can't imagine JFK knew or planned to do or did.

According to Leo Damore, the hit was carried out by William L. Mitchell. He was an army lieutenant who actually gave evidence for the prosecution at the trial of Raymond Crump. According to Damore, Mitchell confessed to the crime after he caught up with him on 30th March, 1993. Mitchell was listed in the Department of Defense Directory in 1964. However, further research revealed that this was a CIA cover name and the army denies all knowledge of him.

It is almost certain that Leo Damore did kill himself. However, the background to why he became so depressed is highly significant. It was a journey that several investigative journalists have taken.

Hi John.

I still ponder the overall 'situation.' We've got a call to a service station [for a Rambler] and timely and coincidental arrival of witnesses to the murder. There is the unexplained cut on Crump's head and hand, and the claim that he was lured from the labor line by a prostitute. The witness that saw a man fitting Crump's description stalking Meyer, the jacket in the water, the lack of a weapon, Crump's bewildered state, his feeble lies - it doesn't seem to me that any one man is pulling off this job. Just speculation - however, it occurs to me it is the classic Patsy scenario. And the amazing part is that it always works - without fail. Commit you murder, set up the frame, and exit. The media will do the rest. Is Mitchell black by any chance? DOD - another interesting coincidence.

- lee

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  • 1 year later...

James DiEugenio review of David Talbot's Brothers:

http://www.ctka.net/brothers.html

It includes an account of the way David Talbot deals with Mary Pinchot Meyer:

Finally, in this regard, I must comment on the book's treatment of JFK and Mary Meyer. I was quite surprised that, as with Sheridan, Talbot swallowed the whole apple on this one. As I have written, (The Assassinations pgs 338-345), any serious chronicler has to be just as careful with this episode as with Judith Exner -- and to his credit, Talbot managed to avoid that disinformation filled land mine. Before criticizing him on this, and before I get smeared by people like John Simkin, I want to make a public confession. I actually believed the Meyer nonsense at one time. In fact, to my everlasting chagrin, I discussed it -- Timothy Leary and all -- at a talk I did in San Francisco about a year after Oliver Stone's JFK came out. It wasn't until I began to examine who Leary was, who his associates were, and how he fit into the whole explosion of drugs into the USA in the sixties and seventies that I began to question who he was. In light of this, I then reexamined his Mary Meyer story, and later the whole legerdemain around this fanciful tale. Thankfully, Talbot does not go into the whole overwrought "mystery" about her death and her mythologized diary. But he eagerly buys into everything else. Yet to do this, one has to believe some rather unbelievable people. And you then have to ignore their credibility problems so your more curious readers won't ask any questions. For if they do the whole edifice starts to unravel.

Foremost among this motley crew is Leary. As I was the first to note, there is a big problem with his story about Meyer coming to him in 1962 for psychedelic drugs. Namely, he didn't write about it for 21 years previous --until 1983. He wrote about 25 books in the meantime. (Sort of like going through 25 FBI, Secret Service, and DPD interviews before you suddenly recall seeing Oswald on the sixth floor.) Yet it was not until he hooked up with the likes of Gordon Liddy that he suddenly recalled, with vivid memory, supplying Mary with LSD and her mentioning of her high official friend and commenting, "They couldn't control him any more. He was changing too fast" etc. etc. etc. Another surprising source Talbot uses here is none other than CIA counter-intelligence chief James Angleton, the guy who was likely handling Oswald until 1962. Talbot actually quotes the nutty Cold Warrior, Kennedy antagonist and Warren Commission cover up artist waxing poetic about Kennedy being in love with Mary: "They were in love ... they had something very important." (p. 199) This from a man who, later on, Talbot admits loathed JFK and actually thought he was a Soviet agent.! (p. 275). A further dubious source is Jim Truitt, the former friend of Ben Bradlee who used to work for him at the Washington Post and was also friends with Angleton. Consider: Truitt had been trying to discredit President Kennedy while he was alive by saying he was previously married and had it covered up. In fact, he had pushed this fatuous story on Bradlee. And it appears that Truitt then started the whole drug angle of the story as a way of getting back at Bradlee and the Post for firing him. By 1969 he was so unstable that his wife sought a conservatorship for him and then divorced him in 1971. Truitt tried to get a job with the CIA and when he did not he moved to Mexico into a colony of former CIA agents. There he grew and smoked the mescaline-based hallucinogenic drug peyote. This was his sorry state when he first reported to the press about the "turned on" Meyer/JFK romance. He then shot himself in 1981. Here you have a guy who was a long-time Kennedy basher, became mentally unstable, was a CIA wannabe, and was planting and taking hallucinogenics with other CIA agents-- and then accuses JFK of doing the same, 14 years after the fact. Some witness, huh? I don't even want to mention the last major source Talbot uses to complete this rickety shack. I have a hard time even typing his name. But I have to. Its sleazy biographer David Heymann. Heymann wrote one of the very worst books ever published on Bobby Kennedy, and has made a lucrative career out of trashing the Kennedy family. For me, Heymann is either a notch above or below the likes of Kitty Kelley. But when you're that low, who's measuring?

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“Finally, in this regard, I must comment on the book's treatment of JFK and Mary Meyer. I was quite surprised that, as with Sheridan, Talbot swallowed the whole apple on this one. As I have written, (The Assassinations pgs 338-345), any serious chronicler has to be just as careful with this episode as with Judith Exner -- and to his credit, Talbot managed to avoid that disinformation filled land mine. Before criticizing him on this, and before I get smeared by people like John Simkin, I want to make a public confession. I actually believed the Meyer nonsense at one time. In fact, to my everlasting chagrin, I discussed it -- Timothy Leary and all -- at a talk I did in San Francisco about a year after Oliver Stone's JFK came out.” (James DiEugenio)

James suggests that he is in danger of being smeared by me for his criticism of the Mary Pinchot story. The reason for this hostility is that I included passages from books by Dale Myers and Gus Russo that were critical of him on the page I created on James DiEugenio. The reason that I include different views on the people that I write about is because of the British educational system. In history we have to teach different interpretations of the past. We encourage students to be critical of the sources. All the people I write about are treated in this way. However, James took offence at this approach to education and insisted I removed these critical comments. It seems that James only likes me to encourage educational debate about establishment figures. For example, I have posted James’ comments about me on my page and the one on Mary Meyer. I have also added some of his harshest criticisms of David Talbot to his page.

I have in fact removed the comments made by Dale Myers and Gus Russo as it seems that James DiEugenio cannot take criticism. I don’t expect David Talbot to make demands that I remove James’ comments about him.

“It wasn't until I began to examine who Leary was, who his associates were, and how he fit into the whole explosion of drugs into the USA in the sixties and seventies that I began to question who he was. In light of this, I then reexamined his Mary Meyer story, and later the whole legerdemain around this fanciful tale. Thankfully, Talbot does not go into the whole overwrought "mystery" about her death and her mythologized diary. But he eagerly buys into everything else. Yet to do this, one has to believe some rather unbelievable people. And you then have to ignore their credibility problems so your more curious readers won't ask any questions. For if they do the whole edifice starts to unravel.

Foremost among this motley crew is Leary. As I was the first to note, there is a big problem with his story about Meyer coming to him in 1962 for psychedelic drugs. Namely, he didn't write about it for 21 years previous --until 1983. He wrote about 25 books in the meantime. (Sort of like going through 25 FBI, Secret Service, and DPD interviews before you suddenly recall seeing Oswald on the sixth floor.) Yet it was not until he hooked up with the likes of Gordon Liddy that he suddenly recalled, with vivid memory, supplying Mary with LSD and her mentioning of her high official friend and commenting, "They couldn't control him any more. He was changing too fast" etc. etc. etc.” (James DiEugenio)

It is true that Tim O’Leary is an unreliable source. However, that does not mean that everything he said is untrue. Is it not possible that he kept quiet for 21 years because he was afraid? After all, O’Leary believed that Mary Pinchot Meyer had been murdered because of what she knew about the events surrounding JFK.

Another surprising source Talbot uses here is none other than CIA counter-intelligence chief James Angleton, the guy who was likely handling Oswald until 1962. Talbot actually quotes the nutty Cold Warrior, Kennedy antagonist and Warren Commission cover up artist waxing poetic about Kennedy being in love with Mary: "They were in love ... they had something very important." (p. 199) This from a man who, later on, Talbot admits loathed JFK and actually thought he was a Soviet agent.! (p. 275). (James DiEugenio)

This is of course ridiculous. David Talbot does not quote Angleton in support of his story about the possibility that Mary Pinchot Meyer was murdered by the CIA. In fact, we know that Angleton lied about certain aspects of the case during Raymond Crump’s trial. Does James DiEugenio believe that Crump was guilty of this crime or was he set-up by the CIA? Is he aware that one of the main witnesses against Crump at the trial was a CIA contract worker?

It seems that James DiEugenio is against using quotes from Angleton as evidence is because he “loathed JFK”. Therefore he is seen as another unreliable source of information. I know some researchers are very protective of JFK and are unhappy when historians criticise him. I believe this creates a major problem. JFK was indeed a very flawed individual. Historians must not see the world like a black and white hat cowboy movie.

A further dubious source is Jim Truitt, the former friend of Ben Bradlee who used to work for him at the Washington Post and was also friends with Angleton. Consider: Truitt had been trying to discredit President Kennedy while he was alive by saying he was previously married and had it covered up. In fact, he had pushed this fatuous story on Bradlee. And it appears that Truitt then started the whole drug angle of the story as a way of getting back at Bradlee and the Post for firing him. By 1969 he was so unstable that his wife sought a conservatorship for him and then divorced him in 1971. Truitt tried to get a job with the CIA and when he did not he moved to Mexico into a colony of former CIA agents. There he grew and smoked the mescaline-based hallucinogenic drug peyote. This was his sorry state when he first reported to the press about the "turned on" Meyer/JFK romance. He then shot himself in 1981. Here you have a guy who was a long-time Kennedy basher, became mentally unstable, was a CIA wannabe, and was planting and taking hallucinogenics with other CIA agents-- and then accuses JFK of doing the same, 14 years after the fact. Some witness, huh? (James DiEugenio)

It is true that Jim Truitt was extremely hostile to Ben Bradlee when in March, 1976, he gave an interview to the National Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Meyer was having an affair with JFK when he was assassinated. He also claimed that Meyer had told his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a private diary "if anything ever happened to me".

Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time that Meyer was murdered on 12th October, 1964. She phoned Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary. Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with JFK, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."

James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew of Mary's relationship with Kennedy and was searching her home looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that she had taken LSD with Kennedy before "they made love".

As you can see, it was not only Jim Truitt’s evidence that supports this story. Ann Truitt, Ben Bradlee, Antoinette Bradlee and James Angleton also agree that it happened. The disagreement concerns the motivation for looking for the diary. According to both Jim and Ann, there was something in that diary that posed a threat to the life of Mary Meyer.

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it was Caligula's court'?" Damore also said that a figure close to the CIA had told him that Mary's death had been a professional "hit".

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were searching for documents in Meyer's house. Meyer had been married to Cord Meyer, a leading CIA operative involved in a variety of covert operations in the early 1950s, including being in charge of Operation Mockingbird. Was the CIA worried that Mary Meyer had kept a record of these activities? It has to be remembered that both Cord and Mary Meyer had held left-wing views in their youth.

We also know that in August, 1953, Richard Helms, Wisner's deputy at the OPC, told Cord Meyer that Joseph McCarthy had accused him of being a communist. The FBI added to the smear by announcing it was unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". However, the FBI refused to explain what evidence they had against Meyer. Allen W. Dulles and both came to his defence and refused to permit a FBI interrogation of Meyer. The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948. It was also pointed out that his wife, Mary Meyer, was a former member of the American Labor Party. Meyer was eventually cleared of these charges and was allowed to keep his job.

Cord’s political opinions changed dramatically after joining the CIA. Mary remained true to her views and politics became a source of conflict between them and was one of the reasons why they were eventually divorced. The CIA would have been very concerned that Mary would have known about Mockingbird and other illegal CIA operations. Did she record these events in her diary? Was this why Mary Pinochet Meyer had been murdered?

“I don't even want to mention the last major source Talbot uses to complete this rickety shack. I have a hard time even typing his name. But I have to. Its sleazy biographer David Heymann. Heymann wrote one of the very worst books ever published on Bobby Kennedy, and has made a lucrative career out of trashing the Kennedy family. For me, Heymann is either a notch above or below the likes of Kitty Kelley. But when you're that low, who's measuring?” (James DiEugenio)

One again the source is considered to be unreliable because he has in the past criticised the Kennedy family. James does not explain what evidence that Heymann provides. From the passage above it would seem to be about JFK’s reputation. That is not true. This is the passage from Heymann’s book, Georgetown Ladies’ Social Club (2003) that he is referring to:

“Cord Meyer gave expression to his support of Angleton in, "Facing Reality," an autobiography subtitled, "From World Federalism to the CIA." In the same volume, he comments briefly on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she had been killed in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, a family friend and longtime personal assistant to Cord Meyer, observed that, "Mr. Meyer didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the markings of an in-house rubout."

Asked to comment on the case, by the current author (C. David Heymann), Cord Meyer held court at the beginning of February 2001 - six weeks before his death - in the barren dining room of a Washington nursing home. Propped up in a chair, his glass eye bulging, he struggled to hold his head aloft. Although he was no longer able to read, the nurses supplied him with a daily copy of The Washington Post, which he carried with him wherever he went. "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed , " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

In other words, Mary Meyer was killed as part of the cover-up to the JFK assassination. James is wrong to suggest that the only sources that we have for this story are the ones mentioned in his review. My main source is someone who knew Mary and Cord Meyer when they lived together in Washington. In fact, he was the son of one of Cord’s colleagues at the CIA. He knows a great deal about this case. I have asked him to post what he has on the Forum. However, he has declined the offer.

He also has a copy of Leo Damore’s unpublished manuscript on Mary Meyer. In it Damore names the CIA contract worker who murdered Mary Meyer. He has given me this name and details of his background. Damore “committed suicide” in October 1995 and the book has never been published. It is therefore understandable why this person is unwilling to post on this forum. Does that make him an unreliable source? In my opinion he is reliable but one of course never really knows.

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...it occurs to me it is the classic Patsy scenario. And the amazing part is that it always works - without fail. Commit you murder, set up the frame, and exit. The media will do the rest. Is Mitchell black by any chance? DOD - another interesting coincidence.

- lee

I am very interested in getting that book by Nina Burleigh: A Very Private Woman: the Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer. In the mean time, does anyone know where Mary Meyer was on November 22, 1963? Could she have been the one who made the Oxnard call? She would have to be in California early that day. Supposedly, the distraught woman was calling from a legal practice and was screaming and whispering, "They're going to kill the President."

It doesn't hurt to inquire. Also, where can I get that book on Mary Meyer?

And I never believed Leo Damore committed suicide, but I don't know the circumstances. When it was announced in the 80's, he was making a lot of appearances and I was reading Senatorial Privilege at the time in paperback. Also, I don't believe Phil Graham killed himself either. And for that matter, some time later, I don't believe Hunter S. Thompson killed himself either. And 2 other mysterious deaths were Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin. And of course John Lennon's death.

Kathy

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For what reason has my post about Gus Russo and Dale Myers been removed

from this thread? Or are there two threads on this subject?

John had put them on an integrity level with Jim DiEugenio. They are not.

Jack

Jack, the post of yours you are referring to appears on the thread entitled: Jim DiEugenio's review of David Talbot's book Brothers.

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...mp;#entry110538

I don't see where John made any claims about anyone's integrity.

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For what reason has my post about Gus Russo and Dale Myers been removed

from this thread? Or are there two threads on this subject?

John had put them on an integrity level with Jim DiEugenio. They are not.

Jack

Jack, the post of yours you are referring to appears on the thread entitled: Jim DiEugenio's review of David Talbot's book Brothers.

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...mp;#entry110538

I don't see where John made any claims about anyone's integrity.

Thanks, Mike. Jim is an HONEST researcher. Myers and Russo are dishonest.

Jack

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I am very interested in getting that book by Nina Burleigh: A Very Private Woman: the Life and Unsolved Murder of Presidential Mistress Mary Meyer. In the mean time, does anyone know where Mary Meyer was on November 22, 1963? Could she have been the one who made the Oxnard call? She would have to be in California early that day. Supposedly, the distraught woman was calling from a legal practice and was screaming and whispering, "They're going to kill the President."

It doesn't hurt to inquire. Also, where can I get that book on Mary Meyer?

Nina Burleigh is a member of this forum and discussed the book with us when it was first published. It was because of this discussion that the person who knew Mary Pinchot Meyer and Cord Meyer made contact with me. He had been a major source of information for Burleigh's book. However, she refused to use any of the information that showed the CIA was involved in her death. He came to the conclusion this was a "limited hangout".

And I never believed Leo Damore committed suicide, but I don't know the circumstances. When it was announced in the 80's, he was making a lot of appearances and I was reading Senatorial Privilege at the time in paperback. Also, I don't believe Phil Graham killed himself either. And for that matter, some time later, I don't believe Hunter S. Thompson killed himself either. And 2 other mysterious deaths were Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin. And of course John Lennon's death.

Leo Damore clearly did pull the trigger. He did it in front of witnesses. That is not the point. The CIA have different ways of destroying people's lives. The CIA killed Damore in the same way they killed Gary Webb.

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