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Known Personnel In/Out of Trauma Room One

Parkland Memorial Hospital

12:38 pm to 2:08 pm

November 22, 1963

compiled by Brad Parker and Charles Crenshaw, M.D.

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While there is no real evidentiary value to "Known Personnel In/Out of Trauma Room One," it represents a part of basic investigative procedure which was overlooked by both the Warren Commission and the subsequent House Assassinations Committee. "They did not even do enough of a research project to find out who all was in the room," observed Charles Crenshaw, M.D., who was in the trauma room while President Kennedy was being treated for his injuries. Through consulting works from Jim Bishop to Harold Weisberg, I completed the initial list in mid 1993. The list was then submitted to Dr. Crenshaw for changes, additions, or other suggestions in January of 1994.

Please note that the authors do not contend that everyone present observed the President's injuries. In fact, few of these people had the opportunity to see the man at the center of the emergency room hysteria. The list consists of people who, at one time or another during the President's time at Parkland, entered the emergency room.

"Known Personnel In/Out of Trauma Room One" has never before appeared in a publication, and we are pleased to offer it through Fair Play.

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L.Name F.Name Position

Akin Gene Resident Anesthesiologist

Bashour Foaud Chief Cardiologist

Baxter Charles Attending Surgeon

Bowron Diana Nurse

Burkley George White House Physician

Cabluck Jarrold F.W.S.T. Photographer

Cain Thomas Priest

Carrico Charles Resident Surgeon

Clark William Chief Neurosurgeon

Crenshaw Charles Resident Surgeon

Curtis Donald Resident Oral Surgeon

Dulany Richard Resident Surgeon

Giesecke Adolf Anesthesiologist

Grossman Robert Resident Neurosurgeon

Henchliffe Margarate Nurse

Hill Clinton Secret Service Agent

Huber Oscar Priest

Hunt Jackie Anesth.-Only woman M.D.

Hutton Pat Nurse

Jenkins Marion Chief Anesthesiologist

Jones Ronald Chief Resident Surgeo

Kellerman Roy Secret Service Agent

Kennedy Jacqueline First Lady

Landis Paul Secret Service Agent

McClelland Robert Attending Surgeon

McGuire Dennis Assistant Undertaker

Midgett William Ob-Gyn Resident

Nelson Doris Chief Superivising Nurse

Nelson John Pediatric Resident

O'Donnell Kenneth Presidential Secretary

O'Neal Vernon Undertaker

Perry Malcolm Attending Surgeon

Peters Paul Urologist

Powers David Presidential Aide

Rike Aubery Assistant Undertaker

Rose Earl Chief Forensic Pathologist

Salyer Kenneth Resident Surgeon

Sanders David Parkland Orderly

Seldin Donald Chief Internist

Standridge Ruth Head Nurse

Stembridge Vernon Chief of Surgical Path.

Stewart David Surgeon

Stewart Sidney Resident Pathologist

Thompson James Priest

Ward Theron Justice of the Peace

Webster Jane OR Assistant Supervisor

White Martin Resident Surgeon

Zedelitz William Resident Surgeon

Back Issues (1-35) here:

http://spot.acorn.net/jfkplace/09/fp.back_...backissues.html

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Another Article:

Lost and Found

by John Kelin

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There was a great deal of interest within the assassination research community in late May, when newly uncovered motion picture film shot in Dallas on November 22, 1963 was broadcast on The CBS Evening News with Dan Rather.

According to CBS, the stuff was "new" in the sense that its existence just recently became known. A call on the American public by the Assassination Records Review Board to give it any film or photographs of that dark day had apparently borne fruit.

But the claim that the film is new, or even significant, has been questioned by some researchers.

CBS showed the film over two nights, amid great hype and hoopla. Warren Commission supporter Richard Trask, author of Pictures of the Pain, was called on by CBS for expert analysis, as was historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. ARRB spokesman Tom Samoluk, who has called the film "a classic find," also appeared in the CBS coverage.

All told, there are some 45 minutes of black and white film clips. CBS aired a smidgeon of that --- a few minutes' worth, at best. Much was made by CBS of a shot in which the doomed President and the First Lady are seen holding hands. There are also shots of new President LBJ leaving Parkland Hospital, police taking several initial suspects and witnesses into custody, and Lee Harvey Oswald at the Dallas police station after his arrest. In addition, the footage shows Oswald's killer, Jack Ruby, at a press conference with Oswald on the night of the assassination. Ruby murdered Oswald two days later.

There were no shots of the motorcade under fire, but police and witnesses are seen running toward a rail yard to search for an assassin immediately ater the shooting, according to the Dallas Morning News.

This "new" film was apparently shot by KTVT cameraman Roy Cooper. As CBS tells the story, it never aired during KTVT's initial assassination coverage, and Cooper literally salvaged it from a cutting room wastebasket. Cooper kept the original and made a copy for a friend, Eli Sturges. They tried but failed to sell it secretly and the copy was stashed under Sturges' home for years. Relatives of Mr. Sturges came forward after hearing about the ARRB's request.

The Review Board reportedly cut a deal with CBS, giving the network an exclusive first broadcast of the film. It isn't clear what, if anything, the Board might have gotten in return.

The footage has been transferred to videotape at the National Archives, where it will be added to the JFK Collection and made accessible to researchers and the public.

There is said to be a much longer version of the Cooper film --- some two and a quarter hours, all told. Relatives of the late cameraman are reportedly interested in selling it, but haven't found a buyer. The Dallas-based Sixth Floor Museum has reportedly expressed interest in the longer version.

In spite of all the excitement over the 45 minute version, longtime researcher and photo expert Jack White says it contains nothing new, and that he saw the footage many years ago at Cooper's home. "I do not know what all the fuss is about," Mr. White wrote to a JFK email group. "Researchers have known about and/or seen this film for more than 20 years and dismissed it as largely unimportant. No serious JFK conspiracy researcher has been interviewed about it..."

But Richard Trask counters: "The film gives us some important, previously unavailable views which could add significantly to our understanding of what happened immediately after the assassination."

Fair Play doesn't understand how believers in the lone-nut theory can also believe this "new" footage can be all that significant, since there isn't anything in it that would alter their final judgement. But we'll confess right here to not being fully informed on this matter. Fair Play's editor was out of town when the film was shown on CBS, and so was unable to tape it, and saw it only once. Here, though, are the insights of FP contributor and ARRB expert Joseph Backes:

As far as I understand it, there was a strong desire on the part of Dan Rather and CBS News to acquire the film before the Review Board got it. I got the impression there was a race.

The Dallas Morning News was trying to help CBS.

In a letter Tom Samoluk told me, "CBS and The Dallas Morning News were aware of the film before the Review Board and CBS personnel and a Dallas Morning News reporter had it in hand before the Review Board staff." Shades of the Zapruder film!

Mr. Samoluk went on to say, "CBS and The Dallas Morning News cooperation with the Board did not interfere with our efforts to acquire the film for the JFK Collection."

I think that Mr. Samoluk is being very diplomatic here. I was not in on the process, of course, but I find it hard to beleive that CBS and the Dallas Morning News were "cooperating" with the Review Board so that the Review Board would get the film.

I asked if CBS was trying to stake a claim on the film as it was produced by a CBS cameraman. Apparently not: "CBS is making no claims relative to the film and the donor has put no restrictions on the donation of the film." One wonders then what are the donor deed of gift regualtions they are still working on?

John Judge told me there is something called "Gaylord communications", I may have misspelled this as I never saw it spelled, that either has or is trying to lay claim to the film. I have no idea who or what Gaylord communications is, or who they represent. There was some piece of paper with that name attached with the videotape the ARRB was giving out.

I'll ask the ARRB about this.

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  • 6 years later...

Another Article:

Lost and Found

by John Kelin

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

There was a great deal of interest within the assassination research community in late May, when newly uncovered motion picture film shot in Dallas on November 22, 1963 was broadcast on The CBS Evening News with Dan Rather.

According to CBS, the stuff was "new" in the sense that its existence just recently became known. A call on the American public by the Assassination Records Review Board to give it any film or photographs of that dark day had apparently borne fruit.

But the claim that the film is new, or even significant, has been questioned by some researchers.

CBS showed the film over two nights, amid great hype and hoopla. Warren Commission supporter Richard Trask, author of Pictures of the Pain, was called on by CBS for expert analysis, as was historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. ARRB spokesman Tom Samoluk, who has called the film "a classic find," also appeared in the CBS coverage.

All told, there are some 45 minutes of black and white film clips. CBS aired a smidgeon of that --- a few minutes' worth, at best. Much was made by CBS of a shot in which the doomed President and the First Lady are seen holding hands. There are also shots of new President LBJ leaving Parkland Hospital, police taking several initial suspects and witnesses into custody, and Lee Harvey Oswald at the Dallas police station after his arrest. In addition, the footage shows Oswald's killer, Jack Ruby, at a press conference with Oswald on the night of the assassination. Ruby murdered Oswald two days later.

There were no shots of the motorcade under fire, but police and witnesses are seen running toward a rail yard to search for an assassin immediately ater the shooting, according to the Dallas Morning News.

This "new" film was apparently shot by KTVT cameraman Roy Cooper. As CBS tells the story, it never aired during KTVT's initial assassination coverage, and Cooper literally salvaged it from a cutting room wastebasket. Cooper kept the original and made a copy for a friend, Eli Sturges. They tried but failed to sell it secretly and the copy was stashed under Sturges' home for years. Relatives of Mr. Sturges came forward after hearing about the ARRB's request.

The Review Board reportedly cut a deal with CBS, giving the network an exclusive first broadcast of the film. It isn't clear what, if anything, the Board might have gotten in return.

The footage has been transferred to videotape at the National Archives, where it will be added to the JFK Collection and made accessible to researchers and the public.

There is said to be a much longer version of the Cooper film --- some two and a quarter hours, all told. Relatives of the late cameraman are reportedly interested in selling it, but haven't found a buyer. The Dallas-based Sixth Floor Museum has reportedly expressed interest in the longer version.

In spite of all the excitement over the 45 minute version, longtime researcher and photo expert Jack White says it contains nothing new, and that he saw the footage many years ago at Cooper's home. "I do not know what all the fuss is about," Mr. White wrote to a JFK email group. "Researchers have known about and/or seen this film for more than 20 years and dismissed it as largely unimportant. No serious JFK conspiracy researcher has been interviewed about it..."

But Richard Trask counters: "The film gives us some important, previously unavailable views which could add significantly to our understanding of what happened immediately after the assassination."

Fair Play doesn't understand how believers in the lone-nut theory can also believe this "new" footage can be all that significant, since there isn't anything in it that would alter their final judgement. But we'll confess right here to not being fully informed on this matter. Fair Play's editor was out of town when the film was shown on CBS, and so was unable to tape it, and saw it only once. Here, though, are the insights of FP contributor and ARRB expert Joseph Backes:

As far as I understand it, there was a strong desire on the part of Dan Rather and CBS News to acquire the film before the Review Board got it. I got the impression there was a race.

The Dallas Morning News was trying to help CBS.

In a letter Tom Samoluk told me, "CBS and The Dallas Morning News were aware of the film before the Review Board and CBS personnel and a Dallas Morning News reporter had it in hand before the Review Board staff." Shades of the Zapruder film!

Mr. Samoluk went on to say, "CBS and The Dallas Morning News cooperation with the Board did not interfere with our efforts to acquire the film for the JFK Collection."

I think that Mr. Samoluk is being very diplomatic here. I was not in on the process, of course, but I find it hard to beleive that CBS and the Dallas Morning News were "cooperating" with the Review Board so that the Review Board would get the film.

I asked if CBS was trying to stake a claim on the film as it was produced by a CBS cameraman. Apparently not: "CBS is making no claims relative to the film and the donor has put no restrictions on the donation of the film." One wonders then what are the donor deed of gift regualtions they are still working on?

John Judge told me there is something called "Gaylord communications", I may have misspelled this as I never saw it spelled, that either has or is trying to lay claim to the film. I have no idea who or what Gaylord communications is, or who they represent. There was some piece of paper with that name attached with the videotape the ARRB was giving out.

I'll ask the ARRB about this.

I have a real aversion to posting new breaking news type threads, so I decided to use this old one because it gives a little contextualization to why what has been written here previously is rather important.

As in Gaylord Communications.....

Read on and I bet you get the general drift of this...

A reminder, the mobile unit in Dealey Plaza has been brought up from time to time....I think this is a good beginning.

I would also suggest that members look into something called CONELRAD it was a communications system that was

connected to the JFK era in the sense, that relates to national emergencies and is even mentioned here and there in the Warren Commission documents.......

Crawford Rice's memory of JFK - Nov. 22, 1963

When Crawford mentioned that he was with KTVT from 1962 to 1966, it brought forth the question of what he was doing on November 22, 1963, when President Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas. Crawford recalls that tragic day and how KTVT responded.

"There was considerable opposition to President Kennedy's being invited to Dallas. However, no one I knew or talked with expected anything serious to happen...probably just some booing and a few critical signs held aloft along the motorcade route. Remember, the Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy assassinations had not yet happened. We were not yet hardened to the fact that there are individuals in this country who will go to the most extreme measures to make their points.

President Kennedy spent the night of November 21, 1963 in Fort Worth. The next morning he appeared at a breakfast gathering with business and civic leaders of that city. I was fortunate enough to be in the audience with Jim Terrell. Mrs. Kennedy was there along with Vice President Lyndon Johnson and his wife 'Lady Bird,' and Texas Governor John Connally and his wife Nellie were also with the President.

President Kennedy's Nov. 22, 1963 breakfast talk was humorous, and he received a positive reception from the Ft. Worth attendees, including Crawford Rice of KTVT

JFK's talk at the Fort Worth breakfast meeting was joking, upbeat and charismatic, as usual. He poked some fun at L.B.J., who was seated beside him, asking why people in Texas cheered more loudly for the Vice President than for the President. The speech was not heavy on politics or issues, mostly just how happy he was to be in the great state of Texas and how he hoped the schedule was so tight that Jackie would not have an opportunity to visit Nieman-Marcus. Jackie was dressed in the pillbox hat and pink dress for the motorcade scheduled later than morning in Dallas.

Jim and I were at a table fairly close to the dais, not front row but with a good view of everyone. We neither saw nor felt any tensions or anxiety, although there was the usual heavy Secret Service presence, of course. KTVT filmed the breakfast and speech, and used highlights repeatedly during the brief times we went to local coverage later that day.

After the breakfast, President Kennedy flew in Air Force One from Carswell Air Force Base, which is east of Fort Worth, to Love Field in Dallas, a distance of about 20 miles. We were told this was done for security reasons. On landing in Dallas, he began that fateful motorcade through the city.

Jim and I returned to the station after the breakfast meeting. I was just preparing to leave the office for lunch when the first bulletin was aired. Kennedy had been shot...perhaps mortally. Along with everyone else, I was in a state of disbelief and shock. But that had to be overcome quickly, as we had the prodigious task of deciding what an independent station with a newsroom staff of 3 persons would do in this unprecedented situation. It soon boiled down to only two choices...somehow get network coverage, or go off the air.

We contacted Roy Bacus, the general manager of WBAP-TV, the NBC affiliate in the market, who very graciously permitted us to duplicate the NBC feed until things returned to normal.

One last interesting sidelight. This was well before the days of ENG and satellites and live coverage everywhere. Each Dallas-Fort Worth station had only one live remote truck, including KTVT. You can imagine the need for live coverage from a number of locations. We promptly turned our truck, including the production and engineering personnel who manned it, over to WBAP-TV to use as they saw fit, a small quid pro quo for the NBC coverage they gave us.

As fate would have it, it was the KTVT truck that was on duty for WBAP at the Dallas County Jail on Sunday morning, when Lee Harvey Oswald was being moved to another location and was shot by Jack Ruby.

NBC's coverage of Oswald's shooting was made possible by the use of KTVT's mobile unit,

as a 'quid pro quo' for the use of WBAP's feed

The murder of Oswald by Ruby was shown live on NBC, and the one lone Ampex two-inch VTR in the KTVT truck was rolling, through someone's foresight or good judgment, and that historic piece of history was recorded on video tape.

End of story."

Be sure to visit the section of our BIG 13 web site called "Tampa Remembers John F. Kennedy." It's a unique look at the day Pres. Kennedy visited Tampa in November of 1963...just four days before the fateful trip to Dallas. You'll see first-person accounts of .....

http://www.big13.net/crawfordrice.htm

KTVT's mobile unit positioned across from the Texas Schoolbook Depository

November 23, 1963

post-3174-085636900 1331391943_thumb.jpg

Edited by Robert Howard
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