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Reily Coffee Company!

May as well check out this GOOD Southern family.

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/e-...bios/reily.text

Particular attention should be given to:

1.  Clinton, LA

2.  Marriage to Estelle Weaks, Daughter of Confederate Colonel James Weaks.

3.  Tulane

4.  Newcomb College

And:

The "Boatner" family from which the William Boatner Reily name comes, were also of Confederate Army heritage.

There were other members of the Oswald family employed at Reily Coffee Company.

Not the kind of family business that would normally employ "Marxist"/Soviet defectors.

Lastly, one just may want to check out the Board of Tulane as well as the varioius years of REX.

The Reily name appears right along with many other names to ultimately follow.

"Col. I. H. Boatner died on 27th March, at his home, Marengo Plantation.

The Monroe Bulletin

Wednesday, April 23, 1884

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/qu...bits/mb1884.txt

How many "Oswald's" can one company hire????

W.S. Oswald (Jr.) was the son of William S. Oswald, brother of LHO's father.

The Julian Oswald has yet to be identified.

http:www.jfk-online.com/billings5.html

This Oswald information regarding the Uncle is also found on the employment application of LHO with Reily Coffee Company.

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This one is well worth reading.

New Orleans Times Picayune, Dec 8, 1980

Burke Rites are Tuesday

William P. Burke, retired Central Intelligence Agency officer, died Sunday (7th) at Touro Infirmiary after a brief illness.  He was 80.

A native of New Orleans, Mr. Burke was regional director of overt activities in the southeastern states for the Central Intelligence Group, a predecessor of the CIA.

A position he held after World War II until his retirement in 1962.

He was educated at ----------Tulane Law School.

He was admitted to the Louisiana and Federal Bars in 1925 and practiced law in New Orleans until 1943, when he volunteered for the Marine Corps.  He served in the Pacific Theater of Operations with the Fourth Marine Division and obtained the rank of lieutenant colonel.

My note:  There are 121 Louisiana Confederate soldiers with the last name "Burke"

William P (Perry) Burke

Father: Honorable Walter James Burke, Membeer of the LA State Senate from 1912 until 1916. Graduate of Tulane University

Mother: Miss. Bertha Perry. Daughter of Judge Robert S. Perry, former 1Lt in Company "C", Eighty Louisiana Regiment, Confederate States of America, and LA State Senator from 1879 until 1884.

Uncle: William R. Burke: Sergeant, Company "D", Eighth Louisiana Infantry.

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The Krewe of "REX"!

There are a variety of locations in which one will find the names of those of New Orleans who were of the prestige, power, and money.

The "Krewe of REX" is one of the primary locations, and REX is always "King" of Mardi Gras in New Orleans

It is also noteworthy that Mildred Lee, Daughter of Confederate General Robert E. Lee was the first "Queen" of the New Orleans Mardi Gras.

In 1883, Winnie Davis, daughter of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, was "Queen" of the New Orleans Mardi Gras.

Although one will not find the name "Oswald" associated with REX.

The name "Claverie" is most certainly found, as is the names of many others who had direct connections to the Claverie family.

"Three generations of Queens of Comus; Mrs. William Burke; Miss Larrousine; Miss Burke"

http://nutrias.org/~noplguides/foc/cabildo.htm

It would appear that history has moved from the Daughters of General Robert E. Lee and Confederate President Jefferson Davis, to the ultimate wife and thereafter the daughter of William Burke.

Director of Overt Operations, Central Intelligence Group.

REX: February 24, 1914

Dukes: Mr. William Boatner Reily, Jr.

Pages: W. P. Burke Jr.

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Assuming that everyone is familiar with Chamberlain/Hunt Academy and the fact that LHO & Brothers spent some time there, all research into this school is well worth the effort.

The death of Joseph Jones of Tulane, as provided earlier, certainly was nothing new for the South.

Jeremiah Chamberlain, co-founder of the Presbyterian Chamberlain/Hunt academy was also assassinated in the front of his home due to his anti-slavery philosophy.

Since there will be considerable discussion on Chamberlain/Hunt Academy later on, research into it's history is well worthwhile.

http://chronicles.dickinson.edu/encyclo/c/...amberlainJ.html

Chamberlain Hunt Academy fell under the direction of the Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

Admission to this school was, and continues to be primarily for those who are of the Presbyterian faith.

This school is not inexpensive, and under most circumstances, even those of the Presbyterian faith must be recommended by their Minister, etc; for admission.

For a "non-Presbyterian" to obtain admission to this school would requre someone of considerable influence and association with the Presbyterian Church of the South to act on their behalf.

This would be true for admission of only one child.

Admission of multiple children/siblings is extremely unusual in the history of the school.

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Those who are familiar with the actions of LHO are no doubt aware that he was found to have kept a small notebook in which many scribbled notations; names; telephone numbers; etc; were kept.

Of those names included in the notebook was the name "Howell" which has been previously discussed.

Knowing of Varina Howell Davis and her family line, from the Howell family of Mississippi, to include family members who moved to New Orleans after the Civil War, this family name caught my attention.

More so than it would most, as I am descended from the Mississippi family of "Howell" on my mothers side of the family.

My Grandmother was what we refer to as a "purebred" Howell, considering that her father and mother (my great-grandfather & great-grandmother) were both named Howell and were in fact full first cousins.

Note: There are 240 listings of the name "Howell" for Mississippi soldiers in the Confederate Army.

There are also 78 listings of the name "Howell" for Louisiana soldiers in the Confederate Army.

Also having recognized the family name "Harvey" in LHO's name quite early, I was also somewhat aware of this Southern family line. Especially since my middle name is also Harvey, having been named after my father, who's name was also Harvey, etc;

Note: There are 57 listings of the name "Harvey" for Louisiana soldiers in the Confederate Army.

There are also 61 listings of the name "Harvey" for Alabama soldiers in the Confederate Army.

Then, in review of the notebook of LHO, one will find the name "Purvis" as well!

Certainly also a good "Southern" name!

As in Purvis, Mississippi which is just North of New Orleans, LA.

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G. Frank Purvis

Pan American Life Insurance

New Orleans, LA

among other listings:

http://www.law.lsu.edu/index.cfm?geaux=aca....professorships

Associations with other good Southerners & a few Yankees

The "Cunningham Award"

http://www.wtcno.org/programs/2005/cunningham2-24.htm

It is assumed that a serious researcher will recognize many of the names here.

Next: Peru

http://nutrias.org/photos/schiro/vhs227.htm

P.S. Don't miss a check on "REX" and the "Boston Club".

P.P.S. It is assumed that many of the names of the Cunningham award are familiar. Such as:

1. Samuel Zemurray----------------United Fruit

2. Dr. Milton Eisenhower-----------Associated with trade with Cuba for Bay of Pigs

Prisoners. Secured the support of William D.

Pawley.

NOT mentioned of course is William Douglas Pawley, Ambassador to Peru, whose wife had also attended Newcomb College (Tulane).

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Assuming that everyone is familiar with Chamberlain/Hunt Academy and the fact that LHO & Brothers spent some time there, all research into this school is well worth the effort.

The death of Joseph Jones of Tulane, as provided earlier, certainly was nothing new for the South.

Jeremiah Chamberlain, co-founder of the Presbyterian Chamberlain/Hunt academy was also assassinated in the front of his home due to his anti-slavery philosophy.

Since there will be considerable discussion on Chamberlain/Hunt Academy later on, research into it's history is well worthwhile.

http://chronicles.dickinson.edu/encyclo/c/...amberlainJ.html

1959

_____

The "Charles E. Dunbar Jr. Fund" of New Orleans, LA, is established at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, the governing body for Chamberlain Hunt Academy.

Chamberlain Hunt Academy fell under the direction of the Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary.

Admission to this school was, and continues to be primarily for those who are of the Presbyterian faith.

This school is not inexpensive, and under most circumstances, even those of the Presbyterian faith must be recommended by their Minister, etc; for admission.

For a "non-Presbyterian" to obtain admission to this school would requre someone of considerable influence and association with the Presbyterian Church of the South to act on their behalf.

This would be true for admission of only one child.

Admission of multiple children/siblings is extremely unusual in the history of the school.

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When looking and reading on the topic of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, one should not overlook those persons who were captured with him and who also spent time imprisoned.

One of these persons was Francis R. Lubbock, former Governor to the State of Texas, who returned to Texas after the end of the war.

Another person captured with Jefferson Davis was John Henniger Reagan, Postmaster General of the Confederacy and acting Secretary of the Treasury at the end of the war.

After release from prison, John Henniger Reagan also moved to Texas and later became  a United States Senator. (1887-1891)

In order to assist in his Career Development, John Henniger Reagan was the recepient of an "Honarary Degree" which was bestowed upon him by Tulane University of New Orleans, LA.

And, not unlike any good "Son of the South", John Henniger Reagan named his frist born son "Jefferson Davis Reagan".

Thereafter, Jefferson Davis Reagan had a daughter, Ruby Taylor Regan, who married Thomas Soule, Jr.

Those not familiar with the "Soule" name should research the history of New Orleans.

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f000/f07/a0000743.htm

Soule College, Inc.

Business Corporation

1424 Whitney Bldg. New Orlean, LA

Incorporated: 1948

Additional information related to the Soule family of New Orleans

http://fpt.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/or...es/s-000029.txt

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  • 6 months later...

Although somewhat irrelevant to the facts of the assassination, I will continue, from time to time, to add "Historical" tidbits of information which shed light on the background of the LHO family tree.

And since the Oswald's as well as the Harvey's were originally from South Mississippi, there is not that much difficulty in tracing much of this past.

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Marriages: Harrison County, Mississippi (Biloxi & Gulfport area)

OSWALD, Wm HARVEY, Mary 1880-Aug-30

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In a recently discovered business ledger of the Pierre Quave Store which operated at Back Bay (North Biloxi) from 1857-1862, Antoine Bellande's name appears in an account held in 1857. His future father-in-law, Pierre Harvey, had accounts at the same store.

PIERRE HERVAI (HARVEY) (1810-1893)

Pierre Harvey (1810-1893) was born in France about 1810. He is the patriarch of the Harvey family of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. It is not known precisely when Pierre Harvey came to the United States or from which French city or department that he immigrated. It is very likely that he arrived in the Back Bay (North Biloxi) community in the 1830s. Here, the young French seaman met and married Celina Morin (1811-1883) on February 20, 1840. The name Morin is now spelled Moran. The marriage of Pierre Harvey and Celina Moran was recorded in the Book of Marriages, Volume 8 (1840-1842), Folio 103 of the Archives of the St. Louis Cathedral at New Orleans.

Pierre Harvey's first tracks in the Harrison County Court House were made in 1842, when he purchased 46 acres of land in irregular Section 17, T7S-R9W from Joseph Morin II (Moran).

On March 2, 1846, Monsieur Harvey made the following statement in the Circuit Court of Harrison County:

This day being a day of the term of said court the second day of March A.D. 1846 personally came and appeared in open court, Pier (sic ), who being duly sworn, and solemnly acclaim that it was his bonafied intention to become a citizen of the United States of America and to renounce forever all allegiance to any foreign state, prince, or sovereignty whatsoever and particularly to Louis Phillip King of the French he has heretofore been a subject. (Minutes of the HARCO, Ms. Circuit Court-Book 1, p. 116)

Pierre Harvey became a citizen of the United States of America on March 6, 1848. This act took place at the Harrison County Circuit Court at Mississippi City and was recorded in the Minutes of the HARCO, Ms. Circuit Court-Book 1, page 183.

Pierre and Celina Harvey and Celina lived on the Back Bay of Biloxi near her father, Joseph Moran II. Here he made his livelihood as a seaman and fisherman. Harvey probably toiled in the coastal schooner trade. Naval stores, salt, lumber and charcoal were produced locally and shipped to New Orleans and Mobile. The traders returned with food staples, tools, and cloth.

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Emma Harvey

The Emma Harvey was a Biloxi schooner utilized in the shrimp and oyster industry of the Mississippi and Louisiana coasts in the early years of this century. She was built by Casimir J. Harvey (1845-1904) at his Back Bay, now D'Iberville, shipyard probably in the 1890's, and was named for his youngest daughter, Emma Agnes Harvey (1889-1968). Although the physical dimensions of the Emma Harvey are not known, it is documented in Chattel Book 2, p. 232 of the Chancery Clerk's Office of Harrison County that Casimir Harvey conveyed a schooner on May 25, 1889, to H.T. Howard. The boat was called the H.T. Howard, and was thirty six feet in length, fourteen and two sixteenth feet in breadth, three feet deep, and weighed eight and thirteen one hundredths tons

To my present knowledge, other Ocean Springs residents with familial connections to the Emma Harvey through its builder, Casmir J. Harvey (1845-1904), are: former Ward IV alderman, Phil Harvey; Carroll Clifford, Jackson County Board of Supervisor from Gautier; and myself. Phil Harvey is as direct descendant of Pierre Harvey, Jr. (1841-1878) and Victoria Koehl (1850-1904). Clifford descends from the builder, Casmir Harvey and Rosina Husley (1852-1937), and I am a descendant of Marie Harvey (1840-1894), and Antoine Victor Bellande (1829-1918). Marie was the eldest child, of French immigrant, Pierre Harvey (probably Hervais or Herve) (1810-1880+), and Celestine Moran (1811-1883). Casmir, Pierre, Jr., and Marie Harvey, who were born at Back Bay (present day D'Iberville), were siblings.

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Thomas Harvey Purvis

Married: Gulfport, Harrison County, MS

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http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...37|1|1|1|21039|

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Mr. PIC - In the summer of 1946, Robert and I were informed that we would stay at the academy to attend summer session there. Well, school let out in May and I think summer session starts in June, so there was a waiting period of about 2 to 3 weeks, so we just stayed there. This suited us fine. We really liked the school.

Sometime during that waiting period my mother showed up and informed us that her and Mr. Ekdahl had separated, and she showed up with Lee, of course, and she was going to take us to Covington where we would stay the summer. We had--the commandant of the school was an attorney, and I think she got some legal assistance from him about divorce proceeding or something. She talked to him about it, I know. His name was Farrell, Herbert D. Farrell. He was commandant of the school. Did you ever talk to him?

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http://www.co.jackson.ms.us/GIPages/Histor.../FairSchool.htm

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There is some "common ground" here for anyone who recognizes it.

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Tom, an interesting place. A number of those supplied information to the MSC. And I suppose therefore indirectly to the LSC as well. Have you come across a similar repository of Louisiana Sovereignty Copmmisssion Files?

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Tom, an interesting place. A number of those supplied information to the MSC. And I suppose therefore indirectly to the LSC as well. Have you come across a similar repository of Louisiana Sovereignty Copmmisssion Files?

There was once considerable information available in New Orleans, however it was not available on line, although one could see what the files available contained.

Much of that availability in various libraries is, and has been shut down for some time now.

I would have to go back and hunt to see what I may find as to locations of some of the information.

Meanwhile:

http://www.haitiforever.com/windowsonhaiti...series_03.shtml

The head of the customs service of Haiti was a clerk of one of the parishes of Louisiana. Second in charge of the customs service of Haiti is a man who was Deputy Collector of Customs at Pascagoula, Mississippi [population, 3,379, 1910 Census]. The Superintendent of Public Instruction was a school teacher in Louisiana -- a State which has not good schools even for white children; the financial advisor, Mr. McIlhenny, is also from Louisiana.

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Pascagoula, MS, and the founders of Louisiana's "Tabasco Sauce" empire, in the land of "Pawley"!

http://www.tabasco.com/

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Tom, an interesting place. A number of those supplied information to the MSC. And I suppose therefore indirectly to the LSC as well. Have you come across a similar repository of Louisiana Sovereignty Copmmisssion Files?

There was once considerable information available in New Orleans, however it was not available on line, although one could see what the files available contained.

Much of that availability in various libraries is, and has been shut down for some time now.

I would have to go back and hunt to see what I may find as to locations of some of the information.

Meanwhile:

http://www.haitiforever.com/windowsonhaiti...series_03.shtml

The head of the customs service of Haiti was a clerk of one of the parishes of Louisiana. Second in charge of the customs service of Haiti is a man who was Deputy Collector of Customs at Pascagoula, Mississippi [population, 3,379, 1910 Census]. The Superintendent of Public Instruction was a school teacher in Louisiana -- a State which has not good schools even for white children; the financial advisor, Mr. McIlhenny, is also from Louisiana.

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Pascagoula, MS, and the founders of Louisiana's "Tabasco Sauce" empire, in the land of "Pawley"!

http://www.tabasco.com/

Guess that I forgot the "Pawley" portion!

The writer recalls a remark made by Mr. E. P. Pawley, an American, who conducts one of the largest business enterprises in Haiti.

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  • 3 months later...
Commander-in-Chief

Sons of Confederate Veterans

1960-1962: Rudolph H. Waldo

The forty-eighth Commander-in-Chief was elected at the 1960 SCV (Sons of Confederate Veterans) Convention held in Montgomery, Alabama and served until 1962.

He was an attorney and native of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Name: Rudolph Henry Waldo

Father: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

Father: James Elliot Waldo

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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