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Commander-in-Chief

Sons of Confederate Veterans

1960-1962: Rudolph H. Waldo

The forty-eighth Commander-in-Chief was elected at the 1960 SCV (Sons of Confederate Veterans) Convention held in Montgomery, Alabama and served until 1962.

He was an attorney and native of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Name: Rudolph Henry Waldo

Father: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

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Name: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

Father: James Elliot Waldo

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For Mr. Dolva:

Since it is assumed that you, of the few, have been following moreso where these things lead.

Waldo, James Elliot, lawyer, educator, and ante-bellum merchant;

Tyler having named him to office in Louisiana, he returned to New Orleans to live, and in 1849 became a member of the ante-bellum firm of Miller, Harris & Waldo shortly after the reconstruction period he retired from business entirely and spent his declining years in the exercise of his scholarly attainments;

his name was identified with almost every commercial and civic movement in Louisiana for over 50 years, and his sympathies were thoroughly assimilated with the South and the state of his adoption;

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Waldo, James Curtis, writer and journalist, son of James Elliot and Eveline Almira (Cobb) Waldo;

came to New Orleans in 1848 and after courses at local schools entered his father's firm;

removed to New York in 1857, where he engaged in wholesale mercantile business up to the opening of the Civil war, when he came South and entered the Confederate army; served only 1 year when he was honorably discharged on account of extreme illness; was offered lucrative appointments by Gen. Butler and the Federal authorities during the occupation of New Orleans and the reconstruction period, all of which he declined; after the Civil war entered journalism as a pursuit and was identified one time or another and in an editorial capacity with practically every democratic and anti-carpet bag newspaper or

publication in New Orleans; his writings and the bitter denunciations by him of carpet bag politicians brought him into frequent conflicts with those in authority during the reconstruction period;

was one of the organizers of the White League, the organization mainly responsible for restoring white rule in Louisiana; took a conspicuous part in the events immediately preceding and which followed the battle of the 14th Sept., 1874, in which conflict he was an active participant;

he was the moving spirit of several carnival organizations and was one of the 8 founders of the Carnival Court;

married Margaret Mary Woods;

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Commander-in-Chief

Sons of Confederate Veterans

1960-1962: Rudolph H. Waldo

The forty-eighth Commander-in-Chief was elected at the 1960 SCV (Sons of Confederate Veterans) Convention held in Montgomery, Alabama and served until 1962.

He was an attorney and native of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Name: Rudolph Henry Waldo

Father: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

Father: James Elliot Waldo

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For Mr. Dolva:

Since it is assumed that you, of the few, have been following moreso where these things lead.

Waldo, James Elliot, lawyer, educator, and ante-bellum merchant;

Tyler having named him to office in Louisiana, he returned to New Orleans to live, and in 1849 became a member of the ante-bellum firm of Miller, Harris & Waldo shortly after the reconstruction period he retired from business entirely and spent his declining years in the exercise of his scholarly attainments;

his name was identified with almost every commercial and civic movement in Louisiana for over 50 years, and his sympathies were thoroughly assimilated with the South and the state of his adoption;

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Waldo, James Curtis, writer and journalist, son of James Elliot and Eveline Almira (Cobb) Waldo;

came to New Orleans in 1848 and after courses at local schools entered his father's firm;

removed to New York in 1857, where he engaged in wholesale mercantile business up to the opening of the Civil war, when he came South and entered the Confederate army; served only 1 year when he was honorably discharged on account of extreme illness; was offered lucrative appointments by Gen. Butler and the Federal authorities during the occupation of New Orleans and the reconstruction period, all of which he declined; after the Civil war entered journalism as a pursuit and was identified one time or another and in an editorial capacity with practically every democratic and anti-carpet bag newspaper or

publication in New Orleans; his writings and the bitter denunciations by him of carpet bag politicians brought him into frequent conflicts with those in authority during the reconstruction period;

was one of the organizers of the White League, the organization mainly responsible for restoring white rule in Louisiana; took a conspicuous part in the events immediately preceding and which followed the battle of the 14th Sept., 1874, in which conflict he was an active participant;

he was the moving spirit of several carnival organizations and was one of the 8 founders of the Carnival Court;

married Margaret Mary Woods;

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Hope you were not of the impression that it ended her John.

Name: James "Curtis" Waldo

Marriage 1 Margaret Mary Woods

Children

Jane Cunningham Agnew "Janey" Waldo b: 12 MAY 1857 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

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Name: Jane Cunningham Agnew "Janey" Waldo

Marriage 1 Sumter Davis Marks b: 29 AUG 1861 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

Married: 29 AUG 1888 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana 4

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Name: FOR AMERICA

Type Entity: Non-Profit Corporation or Co-op (Non-Louisiana)

Mailing Address: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Domicile Address: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Principal Office: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Qualified: 07/14/1954

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): CHARLES E. DUNBAR, JR., 321 ST. CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): SUMTER D. MARKS, JR., 321 ST CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): LOUIS B. CLAVERIE, 321 ST. CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

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Brothers:

Sumter Davis MARKS b: 29 AUG 1861 in New Orleans, La

Henry Malvern MARKS b: 04 AUG 1865 in New Orleans, La.

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Name: Henry Malvern MARKS

Sex: M

Occupation: Railroad Agent

Birth: 04 AUG 1865 in New Orleans, La.

Death: 29 AUG 1920 in Denver, Co.

Burial: FT. WORTH, TX

Children

Howard Harper MARKS b: 28 JUN 1893 in New Orleans, La.

Henry Malvern MARKS b: 24 JAN 1893 in New Orleans, La.

Children

Mabel Lillian MARKS b: 18 FEB 1901 in New Orleans, La.

Carrie Louise MARKS b: 30 JUL 1902 in New Orleans, La.

Mildred Evelyn MARKS b: 09 MAR 1907 in Ft. Worth, Tx.

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Name: Mabel Lillian MARKS

Sex: F

Birth: 18 FEB 1901 in New Orleans, La.

Death: 31 OCT 1986 in Dallas, Tx

Burial: DALLAS, TX.

Marriage 1 Louis Roy VAN LANDINGHAM

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"I am a Marxist" (Marks-ist): Lee Harvey Oswald

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wow...

So Zack, ex Hoover assistant, MSC chief investigator, had familial ties to the heart of Lousiana power? and not that far from there to Lee?

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wow...

So Zack, ex Hoover assistant, MSC chief investigator, had familial ties to the heart of Lousiana power? and not that far from there to Lee?

And if you will recall from previous "tidbits", Henry Malvern Marks acquired his name as a result of the battle of Malvern Hill during the Civil War, in which Henry Clay Marks, brother to Sumter Davis Marks was killed.

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Another son, Henry Clay Marks, was born on July 22, 1843, and enlisted as a Confederate in the War Between the States on July 22, 1861 at Camp Moore, Louisiana. He was assigned to Company B, 10th Louisiana Infantry as a 2nd Lieutenant. Henry Clay served with Company B until January 1862. On January 17, 1862 he was promoted from 2nd Lieutenant to Captain and assumed the command of Company B, 10th Louisiana Infantry. Henry Clay served as commanding officer of Company B until he was killed at the Battle of Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862.

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So, we have here:

1. Direct family ties to the Commander-in-Chief, Sons of Confederate Veterans.

2. Direct family ties to co-founders of the White League

3. Direct family ties to family members killed in the Civil War (Uncle of Sumter Davis Marks, Jr.)

4. Direct family ties to one of the most "right-wing" organizations known. "For America".

5. Direct family ties to the United Fruit Company.

6. Direct family ties to the Claverie Family

And as they say, much, much more!

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Name: DOLLY SHOE CO., INC. (One of Marguerite Claverie's places of employment)

Type Entity: Business Corporation

Registered Agent (Appointed 1/24/1955): CHARLES ROSEN II,---Close associate of Charles E. Dunbar

Registered Agent (Appointed 1/24/1955): FELIX H. LAPEYRE-------

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Name: Harry Joseph Waldo (Brother to Janey Woods Waldo Marks)

Father: James "Curtis" Waldo

Mother: Margaret Mary Woods

Children

Harry Joseph Waldo , Jr

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Harry Joseph Waldo , Jr

Marriage 1 Louise Alice Lepeyre

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For Mr. Dolva:

Since it is assumed that you, of the few, have been following moreso where these things lead.

John;

Since a few other relatively well respected researchers have begun to observe that a few items are now beginning to come together, just thought that it would be remiss on my part were I not to point out something which many would miss.

Especially were one not from down here in the deeeep South Mississippi.

http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/courses/ci407ss/mccomb.html

The event of September 25, 1961 brought the actions of the black community of McComb to a halt. On this day, Herbert Lee , a black farmer and father of nine children, was murdered.Lee was shot and killed by E. H. Hurst, a member of the Mississippi state legislature, for his participation in the black voter registration campaign. Hurst was not charged for his crime.The murder of Lee sent the black community a strong message: stand up for your rights and you may be killed.

The summer of 1964 became known as Freedom Summer . The white community in McComb welcomed the Freedom Summer with fear and panic.The sale of small arms, ammunition, dynamite, and Ku Klux Klan membership increased tremendously.The violence that escalated during the Freedom Summer of 1964 gained McComb the reputation as the bombing capital of the world.

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For Mr. Dolva:

Since it is assumed that you, of the few, have been following moreso where these things lead.

John;

Since a few other relatively well respected researchers have begun to observe that a few items are now beginning to come together, just thought that it would be remiss on my part were I not to point out something which many would miss.

Especially were one not from down here in the deeeep South Mississippi.

http://www.ed.uiuc.edu/courses/ci407ss/mccomb.html

The event of September 25, 1961 brought the actions of the black community of McComb to a halt. On this day, Herbert Lee , a black farmer and father of nine children, was murdered.Lee was shot and killed by E. H. Hurst, a member of the Mississippi state legislature, for his participation in the black voter registration campaign. Hurst was not charged for his crime.The murder of Lee sent the black community a strong message: stand up for your rights and you may be killed.

The summer of 1964 became known as Freedom Summer . The white community in McComb welcomed the Freedom Summer with fear and panic.The sale of small arms, ammunition, dynamite, and Ku Klux Klan membership increased tremendously.The violence that escalated during the Freedom Summer of 1964 gained McComb the reputation as the bombing capital of the world.

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http://korea50.army.mil/partners/mississippi.shtml

Chamberlain-Hunt Academy 124 McComb Avenue, Port Gibson, MS 39150

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http://www.buntingandlyon.com/detail.asp?id=1232&search=

Chamberlain-Hunt was founded by the Presbytery of Mississippi to provide a Christian education marked by strict discipline and high moral values.

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http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/...Vol19_0017a.htm

http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/...Vol19_0015a.htm

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A side note:

http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/...Vol19_0012a.htm

http://www.co.jackson.ms.us/GIPages/Histor.../FairSchool.htm

Assistant Superintendent of Schools

Mr. Herbert D. Farrell

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http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...37|1|1|1|21039|

Mr. Robert Oswald, Attorney, Pascagoula, MS, Chairman Citizens Council

A little more on "distant cousins"

http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...magelisting.php

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Back to Austin!

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...es/AA/iwa2.html

The first buildings included a refectory, the bequest of the late Governor Francis R. Lubbock

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...es/LL/flu1.html

In August 1864 Lubbock was appointed aide-de-camp to Jefferson Davisqv and traveled to Richmond. As an expert on the Trans-Mississippi Department, he provided Davis with firsthand information on the war west of the Mississippi River. At the end of the war Lubbock fled Richmond with Davis and was captured by federal authorities in Georgia. He was imprisoned in Fort Delaware and kept in solitary confinement for eight months before being paroled.

http://www.cemetery.state.tx.us/pub/user_f...p=1&pers_id=524

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Back to school!

http://www.chamberlain-hunt.com/about.shtml

The two original campus buildings, McComb Hall and Guthrie Hall

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http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/...Vol19_0017a.htm

"Please tell the "prize fighter" hello for me.

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http://www.answers.com/topic/boxing

boxing, sport of fighting with fists, also called pugilism and prizefighting(emphasis added)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxing

Boxing in the United States

Until late in the 19th cent., American fighters established their own rules, which were few. Early matches, some of them free-for-alls, featured biting and gouging as well as punching. In most instances they were also illegal. In 1888, John L. Sullivan, a bare-knuckle champion and America's first sports celebrity, won a clandestine 75-round match.

Boxing, also called pugilism, prizefighting (emphasis added)

The first world heavyweight champion under the Queensberry Rules was "Gentleman Jim" Corbett, who defeated John L. Sullivan in 1892 at the Pelican Athletic Club in New Orleans. [6]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_L._Sullivan

In his era, no formalized boxing titles existed. Sullivan became a champion after defeating Paddy Ryan in Mississippi City, MS on February 7, 1882.

http://www.hickoksports.com/calendar/feb07.shtml

Historic Events

1882 - Sullivan Wins Heavyweight Title

In the last major bareknuckle championship fight, John L. Sullivan knocked out Paddy Ryan in the ninth round at Mississippi City, MS. Sullivan held the heavyweight title until 1892, when he lost to Jim Corbett under the Marquis of Queensbury Rules.

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery;jsessi...ivan&sbid=lc04b

Sullivan, John Lawrence 1858–1918.

American prizefighter who was the heavyweight champion from 1882 to 1892. In 1889 he fought the last bare-knuckles title bout. (emphasis added)

He fought and won the last bare-knuckles championship bout (1889) by subduing Jake Kilrain in 75 rounds at Richburg, Miss. Fighting with gloves under the Queensberry rules for boxing, Sullivan was defeated (1892) by James J. Corbett in New Orleans.

The Kilrain fight is considered to be a turning point in boxing history because it was the last world title bout fought under the London Prize Ring rules and therefore the last bare-knuckle heavyweight title bout. For the first time, newspapers carried extensive pre-fight coverage, reporting on the fighters' training and speculating on where the bout would take place. The center of activity was New Orleans, but the governor of Louisiana had forbidden the fight.

On July 7,1889 an estimated 3,000 spectators boarded special trains for the secret location, which turned out to be Richburg, Mississippi, a town just south of Hattiesburg. The fight began at 10:30 the following morning, and it looked as if Sullivan was going to lose, especially after he vomited during the 44th round. But the champion got his second wind after that and Kilrain's manager finally threw in the towel after the 75th round.

http://www.samlindsey.com/Logging/LaurelRR1.asp

Unrelated note: On July 8, 1889 the bare knuckle brawl between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain was to take place in New Orleans. However, Louisiana State Law would not allow it to be in the state; therefore, the railroad sold tickets at 4:00 PM the day of the fight to a mystery location. Three special trains, carrying 2,000 people each left New Orleans and went to Richburg, MS -- just 6 miles south of Hattiesburg (Hattie).

The fight went 75 rounds and was the longest fight in history.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?city=...e=MS&country=us

What's Near Biloxi, MS?

http://www.go-native.com/cgi-bin/distances...TE=MS&RADIUS=25

Mississippi City, MS (12.2 miles)

Pascagoula, MS (15.1 miles)

Pass Christian, MS (24.6 miles)

Gulfport, MS (16.4 miles)

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http://history-matters.com/archive/jfk/wc/...Vol19_0017a.htm

"Please tell the "prize fighter" hello for me.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.answers.com/topic/boxing

boxing, sport of fighting with fists, also called pugilism and prizefighting(emphasis added)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxing

Boxing in the United States

Until late in the 19th cent., American fighters established their own rules, which were few. Early matches, some of them free-for-alls, featured biting and gouging as well as punching. In most instances they were also illegal. In 1888, John L. Sullivan, a bare-knuckle champion and America's first sports celebrity, won a clandestine 75-round match.

Boxing, also called pugilism, prizefighting (emphasis added)

The first world heavyweight champion under the Queensberry Rules was "Gentleman Jim" Corbett, who defeated John L. Sullivan in 1892 at the Pelican Athletic Club in New Orleans. [6]

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_L._Sullivan

In his era, no formalized boxing titles existed. Sullivan became a champion after defeating Paddy Ryan in Mississippi City, MS on February 7, 1882.

http://www.hickoksports.com/calendar/feb07.shtml

Historic Events

1882 - Sullivan Wins Heavyweight Title

In the last major bareknuckle championship fight, John L. Sullivan knocked out Paddy Ryan in the ninth round at Mississippi City, MS. Sullivan held the heavyweight title until 1892, when he lost to Jim Corbett under the Marquis of Queensbury Rules.

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery;jsessi...ivan&sbid=lc04b

Sullivan, John Lawrence 1858–1918.

American prizefighter who was the heavyweight champion from 1882 to 1892. In 1889 he fought the last bare-knuckles title bout. (emphasis added)

He fought and won the last bare-knuckles championship bout (1889) by subduing Jake Kilrain in 75 rounds at Richburg, Miss. Fighting with gloves under the Queensberry rules for boxing, Sullivan was defeated (1892) by James J. Corbett in New Orleans.

The Kilrain fight is considered to be a turning point in boxing history because it was the last world title bout fought under the London Prize Ring rules and therefore the last bare-knuckle heavyweight title bout. For the first time, newspapers carried extensive pre-fight coverage, reporting on the fighters' training and speculating on where the bout would take place. The center of activity was New Orleans, but the governor of Louisiana had forbidden the fight.

On July 7,1889 an estimated 3,000 spectators boarded special trains for the secret location, which turned out to be Richburg, Mississippi, a town just south of Hattiesburg. The fight began at 10:30 the following morning, and it looked as if Sullivan was going to lose, especially after he vomited during the 44th round. But the champion got his second wind after that and Kilrain's manager finally threw in the towel after the 75th round.

http://www.samlindsey.com/Logging/LaurelRR1.asp

Unrelated note: On July 8, 1889 the bare knuckle brawl between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain was to take place in New Orleans. However, Louisiana State Law would not allow it to be in the state; therefore, the railroad sold tickets at 4:00 PM the day of the fight to a mystery location. Three special trains, carrying 2,000 people each left New Orleans and went to Richburg, MS -- just 6 miles south of Hattiesburg (Hattie).

The fight went 75 rounds and was the longest fight in history.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?city=...e=MS&country=us

What's Near Biloxi, MS?

http://www.go-native.com/cgi-bin/distances...TE=MS&RADIUS=25

Mississippi City, MS (12.2 miles)

Pascagoula, MS (15.1 miles)

Pass Christian, MS (24.6 miles)

Gulfport, MS (16.4 miles)

"Please tell the "prize fighter" hello for me.

McComb City

Feby 1st, 89 (1889)

Dear Uncle & Cousin

"Now- Uncle & cousin I must tell you - you have a great nephew & double - cousin- over here since you-left - Now laying all Jokes aside I have got the finest boy in Miss - he is a regular John L- Sullivan -"

Your Nephew & C

C.E. Dunbar

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Portions of a letter from Charles E. Dunbar (Sr.) to his Uncle and first cousin.

Uncle Gip is Gipson C. Dunbar. Cousin is Jefferson Davis Dunbar.

The reference to "nephew & double cousin" as well as "a regular John L. Sullivan" is in reference to Charles E. Dunbar (Jr.), born: McComb, MS, December 26, 1888.

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Jackson Dunbar:------Grandfather of Charles E. Dunbar, (Jr)

Dunbar, Jackson

Confederate

Cavalry

3rd Regiment, Mississippi Cavalry (State Troops)

JACKSON (G. ??) DUNBAR was born January 15, 1815, Louisiana & died August 23, 1890, Mississippi.

He is buried at the City Cemetery, Wesson, Copiah County, Mississippi.

He was married four times. Jackson served in the Confederate Army, the 3rd Mississippi Calvary. Jackson is found in the following Federal Census, all except 1830 are for Copiah County, Mississippi.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John Wesley Dunbar (Brother to C.E. Dunbar (Sr.)

In 1896, Copiah County, Mississippi "J.W. Dunbar" 3rd Mississippi Calvary applied for Pension

Name: J. Wesley Dunbar

Sex: M

Birth: JUN 1837 in Mississippi, [probably] Copiah County

Death: AFT. 18 FEB 1911 in Copiah County, Mississippi

Burial: Mississippi

Census: 1840 Copiah Co., Mississppi

Census: 12 OCT 1850 Copiah Co., Mississippi, page 140 or 279 1060/1060

Census: 25 JUL 1860 Claiborne Co., MS, port Gibson page 93 636/639

Census: 1880 Copiah Co., Beat #3 Vol 5 Sheet 5

Census: 1900 Claiborne Co., MS, port Gibson, Volume 9, sheet 11

Military Service: JUL 1862 CSA, Co. C, discharged for disabilities, 186?

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Name: Jefferson Davis Dunbar (cousin to C. E. Dunbar (Sr.)

Sex: M

ALIA: J.D. or /Jeff/

Birth: 14 MAR 1847 in Copiah County, Mississippi

Military Service: BET. 1863 - 1865 CSA, Co. K, 9th ARK Infantry; PVT

By late 1862 or early 1863, John Dunbar & Jefferson have both enlisted in the Confederate Army.. (Data found indicates John signed up at Hamburg & Jefferson signed up at Elan Twsp., Arkansas) They are both in Company K, 9th Arkansas Infantry as Privates. [in 1911, when Mary L. Dunbar, widow of Jefferson, applied for CSA Widow's Pension in Union County, Arkansas; Mary & her witnesses gave his CSA unit that he served in as Company C, Colonel Wood's Regiment. Two witnesses on application were #1-J. W. Dunbar of Copiah Co., MS. & believed to be Jefferson's first cousin, J. Wesley Dunbar, son of Jackson Dunbar, of Copiah Co. #2 was George B. Nelson who attested to having known him all his life & also of Copiah Co., MS. Also find records saying Jefferson enlisted April, 1863 & was in for duration of war. Peyton's Battalion or Company C, Colonel Wood's Regiment.

May 16, 1863, are in battle at Champion Hill, Mississippi with Grant's troops on their way to laying siege at Vicksburg. The loss of this Battle , near the community of Edwards, opened the way for Grant to begin the siege of Vicksburg. John & Jefferson are both captured & taken prisoner; Jefferson's place of capture was Baker's Creek at Champion Hill. As prisoners they are sent to Memphis & from there on to Fort Delaware, Delaware on Pea Patch Island. On September 20, 1863, they were both transferred to Point Lookout, Maryland POW Camp. They both arrived at Point Lookout on September 22, 1863. On October 19, 1863, John Dunbar was transferred to the General Hospital, Ward 10 (Register N, page 14), suffering from chronic diarrhea. October 27, 1863, John Dunbar died & was buried in a mass grave. (more under John Dunbar notes). A plaque placed on the monument mistakenly has J.D. Dunbar listed as the one buried there.

Jefferson's pay was $11 a month & his service records indicate that in March, 1864, he was paroled or furloughed with a payment of $110 for back pay.

Jefferson Davis Dunbar married Cornelia S. Butler at Hazlehurst, Mississippi on February 13, 1869. By 1870, Jefferson & Cornelia are living in Copiah County, Mississippi, with their first born son, John Gipson Dunbar. By 1880, the family is living in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana with their four children. Cornelia died August 29, 1881, either at or near Crossett, Arkansas.

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Mr. Robert Oswald, Attorney, Pascagoula, MS, Chairman Citizens Council

A little more on "distant cousins"

http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...magelisting.php

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Tom, the link goes to a blank page. I've made the same mistake with that site, it's set up so that a name search result can't be linked to directly. Could you mention the name to enter for this 'megalisting' please?

_________________________

a note for those unfamiliar with this site [ http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/ ] . It's a large collection of documents and photographs, very well organised, from the files of the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission, one of a number of southern state organisations formed to further the interests of I suppose largely Segregation. There are very many relevant background publications, news clippings, documents etc to be explored. The search page is good to bookmark to dip into.

(thank goodness for the 'align left' button)

Edited by John Dolva
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Mr. Robert Oswald, Attorney, Pascagoula, MS, Chairman Citizens Council

A little more on "distant cousins"

http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...magelisting.php

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tom, the link goes to a blank page. I've made the same mistake with that site, it's set up so that a name search result can't be linked to directly. Could you mention the name to enter for this 'megalisting' please?

_________________________

a note for those unfamiliar with this site [ http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/ ] . It's a large collection of documents and photographs, very well organised, from the files of the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission, one of a number of southern state organisations formed to further the interests of I suppose largely Segregation. There are very many relevant background publications, news clippings, documents etc to be explored. The search page is good to bookmark to dip into.

(thank goodness for the 'align left' button)

You will find Robert Oswald listed in the person search, as "Robert Oswald and as Robert H. Oswald.

In addition, you will find his name listed as a member of the "Citizen's Council" on several of their documents.

"Judge" Oswald resides in Pascagoula, MS.

http://www.msbar.org/lawyerdirectory_by_la...?first_letter=O

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF JACKSON COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

SO ORDERED, this the 14th day of January, 1988.

KENNETH B. ROBERTSON

ROBERT H. OSWALD

GLENN BARLOW

Chancellors

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  • 3 weeks later...

Mr. Robert Oswald, Attorney, Pascagoula, MS, Chairman Citizens Council

A little more on "distant cousins"

http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...magelisting.php

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tom, the link goes to a blank page. I've made the same mistake with that site, it's set up so that a name search result can't be linked to directly. Could you mention the name to enter for this 'megalisting' please?

_________________________

a note for those unfamiliar with this site [ http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/ ] . It's a large collection of documents and photographs, very well organised, from the files of the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission, one of a number of southern state organisations formed to further the interests of I suppose largely Segregation. There are very many relevant background publications, news clippings, documents etc to be explored. The search page is good to bookmark to dip into.

(thank goodness for the 'align left' button)

You will find Robert Oswald listed in the person search, as "Robert Oswald and as Robert H. Oswald.

In addition, you will find his name listed as a member of the "Citizen's Council" on several of their documents.

"Judge" Oswald resides in Pascagoula, MS.

http://www.msbar.org/lawyerdirectory_by_la...?first_letter=O

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF JACKSON COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

SO ORDERED, this the 14th day of January, 1988.

KENNETH B. ROBERTSON

ROBERT H. OSWALD

GLENN BARLOW

Chancellors

George County, MS did not come into existence until 1910.

The Southern one-half of George County formerly being Jackson County, MS.

Therefore, we, (the "Southerners" of George County, and Jackson County) have much in common.

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  • 2 months later...

Commander-in-Chief

Sons of Confederate Veterans

1960-1962: Rudolph H. Waldo

The forty-eighth Commander-in-Chief was elected at the 1960 SCV (Sons of Confederate Veterans) Convention held in Montgomery, Alabama and served until 1962.

He was an attorney and native of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Name: Rudolph Henry Waldo

Father: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

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Name: John Fowle Crosby Waldo

Father: James Elliot Waldo

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For Mr. Dolva:

Since it is assumed that you, of the few, have been following moreso where these things lead.

Waldo, James Elliot, lawyer, educator, and ante-bellum merchant;

Tyler having named him to office in Louisiana, he returned to New Orleans to live, and in 1849 became a member of the ante-bellum firm of Miller, Harris & Waldo shortly after the reconstruction period he retired from business entirely and spent his declining years in the exercise of his scholarly attainments;

his name was identified with almost every commercial and civic movement in Louisiana for over 50 years, and his sympathies were thoroughly assimilated with the South and the state of his adoption;

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Waldo, James Curtis, writer and journalist, son of James Elliot and Eveline Almira (Cobb) Waldo;

came to New Orleans in 1848 and after courses at local schools entered his father's firm;

removed to New York in 1857, where he engaged in wholesale mercantile business up to the opening of the Civil war, when he came South and entered the Confederate army; served only 1 year when he was honorably discharged on account of extreme illness; was offered lucrative appointments by Gen. Butler and the Federal authorities during the occupation of New Orleans and the reconstruction period, all of which he declined; after the Civil war entered journalism as a pursuit and was identified one time or another and in an editorial capacity with practically every democratic and anti-carpet bag newspaper or

publication in New Orleans; his writings and the bitter denunciations by him of carpet bag politicians brought him into frequent conflicts with those in authority during the reconstruction period;

was one of the organizers of the White League, the organization mainly responsible for restoring white rule in Louisiana; took a conspicuous part in the events immediately preceding and which followed the battle of the 14th Sept., 1874, in which conflict he was an active participant;

he was the moving spirit of several carnival organizations and was one of the 8 founders of the Carnival Court;

married Margaret Mary Woods;

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Hope you were not of the impression that it ended her John.

Name: James "Curtis" Waldo

Marriage 1 Margaret Mary Woods

Children

Jane Cunningham Agnew "Janey" Waldo b: 12 MAY 1857 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

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Name: Jane Cunningham Agnew "Janey" Waldo

Marriage 1 Sumter Davis Marks b: 29 AUG 1861 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana

Married: 29 AUG 1888 in New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana 4

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Name: FOR AMERICA

Type Entity: Non-Profit Corporation or Co-op (Non-Louisiana)

Mailing Address: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Domicile Address: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Principal Office: 208 S LASALLE ST, CHICAGO, IL 60604

Qualified: 07/14/1954

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): CHARLES E. DUNBAR, JR., 321 ST. CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): SUMTER D. MARKS, JR., 321 ST CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

Registered Agent (Appointed 7/14/1954): LOUIS B. CLAVERIE, 321 ST. CHARLES, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70130

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Brothers:

Sumter Davis MARKS b: 29 AUG 1861 in New Orleans, La

Henry Malvern MARKS b: 04 AUG 1865 in New Orleans, La.

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Name: Henry Malvern MARKS

Sex: M

Occupation: Railroad Agent

Birth: 04 AUG 1865 in New Orleans, La.

Death: 29 AUG 1920 in Denver, Co.

Burial: FT. WORTH, TX

Children

Howard Harper MARKS b: 28 JUN 1893 in New Orleans, La.

Henry Malvern MARKS b: 24 JAN 1893 in New Orleans, La.

Children

Mabel Lillian MARKS b: 18 FEB 1901 in New Orleans, La.

Carrie Louise MARKS b: 30 JUL 1902 in New Orleans, La.

Mildred Evelyn MARKS b: 09 MAR 1907 in Ft. Worth, Tx.

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Name: Mabel Lillian MARKS

Sex: F

Birth: 18 FEB 1901 in New Orleans, La.

Death: 31 OCT 1986 in Dallas, Tx

Burial: DALLAS, TX.

Marriage 1 Louis Roy VAN LANDINGHAM

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"I am a Marxist" (Marks-ist): Lee Harvey Oswald

Marriage 1 Louis Roy VAN LANDINGHAM

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Louis Roy VanLandingham b: 17 JUL 1899 in Lone Oak, Texas

Father:

Thomas Edward VanLandingham 1 2 1 2 1 2 3

Sex: M

Birth: NOV 1859 in Texas 1 2 1 2 1 2 3

Death: 4 2 4 2 4 2 3

Note: Thomas Edward VanLandingham lived in Lone Oak, Hunt Co., Texas in 1899 when his son Louis Roy was born, and in 1900 when the census was taken.

Father:

Name: William Crawford VanLandingham 1 2 3

Sex: M

Birth: 6 DEC 1826 in Alabama 1 2 3

Death: 2 JAN 1904 in Donelton, Hunt Co., Texas 1 2 3

Note:

William Crawford VanLandingham served with Company E, 2nd. Texas Cavalry, Army of the Confederacy.

1870 census Hunt Co., Texas

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