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The "Serpent" & the South


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Over under the KKK topic, the discussion of the Masonic Order came out.

In conjunction with this was posted two links. One to the old New Orleans Masonic Hall & Louisiana Lottery Building, and a second link to "The Serpent" as the Louisiana Lottery was referred to.

http://nutrias.org/~nopl/photos/mugnier/streets/gfmst01.jpg

For the Masonic Hall/Louisiana Lottery Bldg.

http://www.oldandsold.com/articles01/article922.shtml

For information on the Louisiana Lottery, aka "The Serpent".

I would also recommend a search for other articles related to the Louisiana Lottery which holds the record, hands down, for having been one of the single most crooked con/swindles in US history.

Particular emphasis should be paid to the founders of this lottery, as well as to the Confederate Generals which were utilized as the "Front" of respectability which the lottery presented in it's operation.

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Over under the KKK topic, the discussion of the Masonic Order came out.

In conjunction with this was posted two links.  One to the old New Orleans Masonic Hall & Louisiana Lottery Building, and a second link to "The Serpent" as the Louisiana Lottery was referred to.

http://nutrias.org/~nopl/photos/mugnier/streets/gfmst01.jpg

For the Masonic Hall/Louisiana Lottery Bldg.

http://www.oldandsold.com/articles01/article922.shtml

For information on the Louisiana Lottery, aka "The Serpent".

I would also recommend a search for other articles related to the Louisiana Lottery which holds the record, hands down, for having been one of the single most crooked con/swindles in US history.

Particular emphasis should be paid to the founders of this lottery, as well as to the Confederate Generals which were utilized as the "Front" of respectability which the lottery presented in it's operation.

Tom, I've been trying to follow those links,(yesterday and today) but from down here they come across as inactive. Can you post a summary perhaps, or recheck the links to see if they are presented correctly?

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Over under the KKK topic, the discussion of the Masonic Order came out.

In conjunction with this was posted two links.  One to the old New Orleans Masonic Hall & Louisiana Lottery Building, and a second link to "The Serpent" as the Louisiana Lottery was referred to.

http://nutrias.org/~nopl/photos/mugnier/streets/gfmst01.jpg

For the Masonic Hall/Louisiana Lottery Bldg.

http://www.oldandsold.com/articles01/article922.shtml

For information on the Louisiana Lottery, aka "The Serpent".

I would also recommend a search for other articles related to the Louisiana Lottery which holds the record, hands down, for having been one of the single most crooked con/swindles in US history.

Particular emphasis should be paid to the founders of this lottery, as well as to the Confederate Generals which were utilized as the "Front" of respectability which the lottery presented in it's operation.

Tom, I've been trying to follow those links,(yesterday and today) but from down here they come across as inactive. Can you post a summary perhaps, or recheck the links to see if they are presented correctly?

Both are active and correct links.

The first is a photograph of the permanent building in New Orleans which was jointly the Masonic Bldg. as well as the home to the Louisiana Lottery Company.

The second link explains the origin of the Lottery system in the US, and then goes into great detail on "The Serpent" which was the name given to the single largest and most crooked lottery to exist in the U.S. . That being the Louisiana Lottery Company.

"A colossal and corrupt exception to this was the richest and most politically powerful lottery that ever flourished in the United States. It was run by the Louisiana Lottery Company and known simply as "The Serpent".

There is extensive discussion on the corruption of the Louisiana Lottery and it's operation as a "State" authorized monoply and franchised lottery.

The Lottery utilized Confederate Generals P.G.T. Beauregard and Jubal Early as a "front" to give respectibility to the system.

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For anyone who desires to fully research the Louisiana Lottery Company, the following will help:

Keyword: Louisiana Lottery Company

Contains: Charles T. Howard or:

The Serpent

The Octopus

Or the keyword "Charles T. Howard" can be utilized.

Charles T. Howard, Crescent Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, Confederate States of America.

A review of the Louisiana Lottery Company will demonstrate the manner in which many of those wealthy persons of New Orleans who lost their wealth as a result of the Civil War, regained this wealth through the Louisiana Lottery Company and usage of the prestige of Confederate Generals Beauregard and Early to promote their "numbers" racket.

The Confederate Museum

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/museum_05a.htm

Constructed and paid for by Frank T. Howard, son of Charles T. Howard.

Needless to say, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America lay in state in the Confederate Museum after removal from Metarie Cemetery, and prior to removal and re-burial in Virginia.

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More on where some of the "Serpent's" monies ended up!

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/howard_box.htm

One should pay notice to the reference to "REX", as well as award of the "Loving Cup".

In addition, the Annie T. Howard Library, which is essentially connected to the Confederate Memorial Hall, was of course associated with the Newcomb College portion of Tulane University.

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John Albert Morris

The other "top dog" in The Louisiana Lottery

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/or...os/m-000034.txt

Married to Cora Hennan of New Orleans, daughter of Judge Alfred Hennen.

Brother-in-law to General John Bell Hood who married Annie Marie Hennen.

Uncle to Oswald Harvey (Harney) Hood!

Acquired New Orleans race track and made it into Metarie Cemetery, where Jefferson Davis was initially buried.

Sold the "Hennen" estate to Samuel Zemurray of "United Fruit" fame and fortune.

Boston Club

Mardi Gras Carnival association

REX Maid, February 10, 1912----Miss Cora Hennan Morris (daughter)

Died on his Texas ranch, May 26, 1895.

Morris Ranch, Texas---Gillespie County

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/MM/hrm51.html

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United States District Court E. D. Louisiana,

New Orleans Division.

March 28, 1962

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Action against the administrators of Tulane University of Louisiana and others wherein the plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment. The District Court, J. Skelly Wright, J., held, inter alia, that Tulane University cannot discriminate in admissions on basis of race on theory that it is a private institution and hence immune from command of Fourteenth Amendment where complete history of University indicates that it is now, as it always was, a public institution, but even if University had been transformed into a private institution as a matter of local law, the present involvement of state is sufficient to subject University to constitutional restraints on governmental action.

Motion granted.

Final Outcome

The scorn and ostracism faced by Judge Wright and his family from members of the uptown community who resented his rulings on desegregation had made his family's life unbearable [1]. On February 2, 1962, President John F. Kennedy nominated Wright to a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and simultaneously nominated attorney Frank Burton Ellis, a former Louisiana state senator more tolerant of segregation, to the seat occupied by Wright on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana. The newly-appointed Judge Frank Ellis received his commission on April 12, 1962, and Judge Skelly Wright's service in his native New Orleans ended on April 15, 1962 [2].

Directly upon Wright's departure, on April 19, 1962, Tulane filed a motion requesting that Judge Ellis vacate Judge Wright's judgment and retry the case [3]. This was an extraordinary tactic that bypassed the normal procedure of appealing to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. The novice judge granted Tulane's request and by that December had ruled in Tulane's favor, overturning Wright's decision on every major issue. The unusual circumstances of the entire episode lends credence to suspicions of active behind-the-scenes political maneuvering. An excerpt of Judge Ellis's opinion follows.

December 5, 1962

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Defendant's position is that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to Tulane University because it is a "private individual" under the doctrine of the Civil Rights Cases, 109 U.S. 3, 3 S.Ct. 18, 27 L.Ed. 835, enunciating the proposition that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to private individuals.

The source of Tulane's present policy is the act of donation of one Paul Tulane, a philanthropist and early benefactor of the University. That act, which prompted the incorporation of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund on May 29, 1882, restricted the use of the funds to "white young persons." A later gift by one Sophie Newcomb included a similar restriction. The necessity of the Administrators' compliance with the terms of Paul Tulane's donation is embraced in its corporate charter as well as the statutory law of the State of Louisiana by Act 43 of 1884, LSA-R.S. Tit. 17, c. 6 note included in the Louisiana Constitution by Art. 269 of 1888. Thus, although the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund are on official record as desiring otherwise, the Administrators stand on the position that they are legally bound to restrict admissions to Tulane University to white persons and, moreover, that this restriction is constitutionally permissible because Tulane University of Louisiana is a "private school."

- - - - - -

JUDGMENT

IT IS ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECLARED that:

a The Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund is a private eleemosonary corporation engaged in higher education.

b The Tulane University of Louisiana is a private activity of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund.

c There is insufficient state involvement in the operation of the Tulane University of Louisiana to bring it within the privileges and proscriptions of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that judgment be entered in favor of defendants and against plaintiffs.

From: Guillory v. Administrators of Tulane University of LA., 212 F.Supp. 674, 676, 687 (1962).

Edited by John Dolva
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United States District Court E. D. Louisiana,

New Orleans Division.

 

March 28, 1962

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Action against the administrators of Tulane University of Louisiana and others wherein the plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment.  The District Court, J. Skelly Wright, J., held, inter alia, that Tulane University cannot discriminate in admissions on basis of race on theory that it is a private institution and hence immune from command of Fourteenth Amendment where complete history of University indicates that it is now, as it always was, a public institution, but even if University had been transformed into a private institution as a matter of local law, the present involvement of state is sufficient to subject University to constitutional restraints on governmental action.

Motion granted.

Final Outcome

The scorn and ostracism faced by Judge Wright and his family from members of the uptown community who resented his rulings on desegregation had made his family's life unbearable [1].  On February 2, 1962, President John F. Kennedy nominated Wright to a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and simultaneously nominated attorney Frank Burton Ellis, a former Louisiana state senator more tolerant of segregation, to the seat occupied by Wright on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.  The newly-appointed Judge Frank Ellis received his commission on April 12, 1962, and Judge Skelly Wright's service in his native New Orleans ended on April 15, 1962 [2].

Directly upon Wright's departure, on April 19, 1962, Tulane filed a motion requesting that Judge Ellis vacate Judge Wright's judgment and retry the case [3].  This was an extraordinary tactic that bypassed the normal procedure of appealing to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.  The novice judge granted Tulane's request and by that December had ruled in Tulane's favor, overturning Wright's decision on every major issue.  The unusual circumstances of the entire episode lends credence to suspicions of active behind-the-scenes political maneuvering.  An excerpt of Judge Ellis's opinion follows.

 

December 5, 1962

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Defendant's position is that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to Tulane University because it is a "private individual" under the doctrine of the Civil Rights Cases, 109 U.S. 3, 3 S.Ct. 18, 27 L.Ed. 835, enunciating the proposition that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to private individuals.

The source of Tulane's present policy is the act of donation of one Paul Tulane, a philanthropist and early benefactor of the University.  That act, which prompted the incorporation of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund on May 29, 1882, restricted the use of the funds to "white young persons."  A later gift by one Sophie Newcomb included a similar restriction.  The necessity of the Administrators' compliance with the terms of Paul Tulane's donation is embraced in its corporate charter as well as the statutory law of the State of Louisiana by Act 43 of 1884, LSA-R.S. Tit. 17, c. 6 note included in the Louisiana Constitution by Art. 269 of 1888.  Thus, although the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund are on official record as desiring otherwise, the Administrators stand on the position that they are legally bound to restrict admissions to Tulane University to white persons and, moreover, that this restriction is constitutionally permissible because Tulane University of Louisiana is a "private school."

-      -      -      -      -      -

 

JUDGMENT

IT IS ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECLARED that:

a  The Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund is a private eleemosonary corporation engaged in higher education.

b  The Tulane University of Louisiana is a private activity of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund.

c  There is insufficient state involvement in the operation of the Tulane University of Louisiana to bring it within the privileges and proscriptions of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that judgment be entered in favor of defendants and against plaintiffs.

From: Guillory v. Administrators of Tulane University of LA., 212 F.Supp. 674, 676, 687 (1962).

As relates to your Tulane Integration post:

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/skellywright_box.htm

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United States District Court E. D. Louisiana,

New Orleans Division.

 

March 28, 1962

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Action against the administrators of Tulane University of Louisiana and others wherein the plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment.  The District Court, J. Skelly Wright, J., held, inter alia, that Tulane University cannot discriminate in admissions on basis of race on theory that it is a private institution and hence immune from command of Fourteenth Amendment where complete history of University indicates that it is now, as it always was, a public institution, but even if University had been transformed into a private institution as a matter of local law, the present involvement of state is sufficient to subject University to constitutional restraints on governmental action.

Motion granted.

Final Outcome

The scorn and ostracism faced by Judge Wright and his family from members of the uptown community who resented his rulings on desegregation had made his family's life unbearable [1].  On February 2, 1962, President John F. Kennedy nominated Wright to a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and simultaneously nominated attorney Frank Burton Ellis, a former Louisiana state senator more tolerant of segregation, to the seat occupied by Wright on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.  The newly-appointed Judge Frank Ellis received his commission on April 12, 1962, and Judge Skelly Wright's service in his native New Orleans ended on April 15, 1962 [2].

Directly upon Wright's departure, on April 19, 1962, Tulane filed a motion requesting that Judge Ellis vacate Judge Wright's judgment and retry the case [3].  This was an extraordinary tactic that bypassed the normal procedure of appealing to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.  The novice judge granted Tulane's request and by that December had ruled in Tulane's favor, overturning Wright's decision on every major issue.  The unusual circumstances of the entire episode lends credence to suspicions of active behind-the-scenes political maneuvering.  An excerpt of Judge Ellis's opinion follows.

 

December 5, 1962

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Defendant's position is that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to Tulane University because it is a "private individual" under the doctrine of the Civil Rights Cases, 109 U.S. 3, 3 S.Ct. 18, 27 L.Ed. 835, enunciating the proposition that the Fourteenth Amendment does not apply to private individuals.

The source of Tulane's present policy is the act of donation of one Paul Tulane, a philanthropist and early benefactor of the University.  That act, which prompted the incorporation of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund on May 29, 1882, restricted the use of the funds to "white young persons."  A later gift by one Sophie Newcomb included a similar restriction.  The necessity of the Administrators' compliance with the terms of Paul Tulane's donation is embraced in its corporate charter as well as the statutory law of the State of Louisiana by Act 43 of 1884, LSA-R.S. Tit. 17, c. 6 note included in the Louisiana Constitution by Art. 269 of 1888.  Thus, although the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund are on official record as desiring otherwise, the Administrators stand on the position that they are legally bound to restrict admissions to Tulane University to white persons and, moreover, that this restriction is constitutionally permissible because Tulane University of Louisiana is a "private school."

-      -      -      -      -      -

 

JUDGMENT

IT IS ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECLARED that:

a  The Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund is a private eleemosonary corporation engaged in higher education.

b  The Tulane University of Louisiana is a private activity of the Administrators of the Tulane Educational Fund.

c  There is insufficient state involvement in the operation of the Tulane University of Louisiana to bring it within the privileges and proscriptions of the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED that judgment be entered in favor of defendants and against plaintiffs.

From: Guillory v. Administrators of Tulane University of LA., 212 F.Supp. 674, 676, 687 (1962).

As relates to your Tulane Integration post:

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/skellywright_box.htm

For those who have not taken the time and effort to actually research the facts of Tulane University.

http://www.tulanelink.com/tulanelink/tulanepast_box.htm

Tulane was bought and paid for by the profits derived from the slave trade.

Louis Tulane, father of Paul Tulane(founder of Tulane University), made his fortune in Haiti through the use of slave labor.

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John Albert Morris

The other "top dog" in The Louisiana Lottery

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/or...os/m-000034.txt

Married to Cora Hennan of New Orleans, daughter of Judge Alfred Hennen.

Brother-in-law to General John Bell Hood who married Annie Marie Hennen.

Uncle to Oswald Harvey (Harney) Hood!

Acquired New Orleans race track and made it into Metarie Cemetery, where Jefferson Davis was initially buried.

Sold the "Hennen" estate to Samuel Zemurray of "United Fruit" fame and fortune.

Boston Club

Mardi Gras Carnival association

REX Maid, February 10, 1912----Miss Cora Hennan Morris (daughter)

Died on his Texas ranch, May 26, 1895.

Morris Ranch, Texas---Gillespie County

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/MM/hrm51.html

Dave Hennan Morris

U.S. Ambassador to Belgium (1933-1937)

U.S. Minister to Luxembourg

Married: Alice (Vanderbilt) Shepard

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John Albert Morris

The other "top dog" in The Louisiana Lottery

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/la/or...os/m-000034.txt

Married to Cora Hennan of New Orleans, daughter of Judge Alfred Hennen.

Brother-in-law to General John Bell Hood who married Annie Marie Hennen.

Uncle to Oswald Harvey (Harney) Hood!

Acquired New Orleans race track and made it into Metarie Cemetery, where Jefferson Davis was initially buried.

Sold the "Hennen" estate to Samuel Zemurray of "United Fruit" fame and fortune.

Boston Club

Mardi Gras Carnival association

REX Maid, February 10, 1912----Miss Cora Hennan Morris (daughter)

Died on his Texas ranch, May 26, 1895.

Morris Ranch, Texas---Gillespie County

http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/MM/hrm51.html

Dave Hennan Morris

U.S. Ambassador to Belgium (1933-1937)

U.S. Minister to Luxembourg

Married: Alice (Vanderbilt) Shepard

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