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General Walker : a 'pauper'?


John Dolva
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Was General Walkers activities turning him into a pauper that couldn't even afford an air conditioner?

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This is the man arrested on four federal charges in Mississippi in 1962:

"In 1961, Gen. Edwin Walker was commander of the 24th Division of the U.S. Army in West Germany, when he was relieved of his command because he attempted to indoctrinate his men with his political philosophy. Soon after, he resigned from the Army. In 1962-63, Gen. Edwin Walker had the financial backing of Haroldson L. Hunt, in his campaign to fight communism in the U.S.. H. L. Hunt was the richest oilman in Texas. Both men lived and worked in Dallas and were members of the John Birch Society."

The Strange Case of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker - http://www.textfiles.com/conspiracy/walker.txt

"Those charges were:

Section 111-- For assault and resisting or other opposing Federal

officers, including marshals, in the performance of their duty.

Section 372-- For conspiracy to prevent a Federal officer from

discharging his duties.

Section 2383-- For inciting or engaging in an insurrection

against the United States.

Section 2384-- For conspiracy to overthrow or oppose by force

the execution of the laws of the United States.

[[His public statement at Oxford was as follows:

This is Edwin A. Walker. I am in Mississippi beside Gov. Ross

Barnett. I call for a national protest against the conspiracy

from within.

Rally to the cause of freedom in righteous indignation, violent

vocal protest and bitter silence under the flag of Mississippi

at the use of Federal troops.

This today is a disgrace to the nation in 'dire peril,' a

disgrace beyond the capacity of anyone except its enemies.

This is the conspiracy of the crucifixion by anti-Christ

conspirators of the Supreme Court in their denial of prayer

and their betrayal of a nation.]]

A conspiracy is defined legally as including two or more persons.

On October 7, 1962, Walker posted $50,000 bond and returned home to Dallas amid 200 cheering supporters carrying signs like "Welcome Home, General Walker," "Win With General Walker," and "President '64."

On January 21, 1963, a federal grand jury in Oxford, Mississippi adjourned without indicting Walker on any of the four counts against him.

The Justice Department dismissed the charges "without prejudice" after the grand jury failed to indict. The dismissal "without prejudice" meant that the charges could be reinstated before the five year statute of limitations expired.

Walker and his supporters then went on the offensive. On April 2, 1963, a group called the Citizens Congressional Committee filed a petition with the Senate Judiciary Committee requesting an investigation of the treatment of "America's fearless patriot on the occasion of his incarceration at the instigation of the Department of Justice."

Nine days later, on April 9, Walker was sitting at his desk at home when the famous shooting incident occurred.

Meanwhile, the American Medical Association was receiving "a volume of letters from individual physicians" charging Dr. Charles E. Smith, the Army psychiatrist -- who commented on Walker's mental state at the time of the Oxford violence -- with unethical conduct: that he made an improper diagnosis without a personal examination. Dr. Smith was cleared by the AMA on July 4, 1963. He said that news stories of Walker's "reported behavior reflects sensitivity and essentially unpredictable and seemingly bizarre outbursts of the type often observed in individuals suffering with paranoid mental disorder." The society had received 2,500 letters from physicians alleging unethical conduct by Dr. Smith. Nevertheless, the board unanimously ruled in Smith's favor.

Walker then took his case to court, filing a total of $23 million dollars in libel damages against numerous media outlets alleging that they had made "false statements" and that their "suppression of truth was motivated by malice and a desire to hurt and harm him in his good reputation and blacken his good name." The statements in question were that he "led a charge of students against Federal marshals on the Ole Miss campus" and various other statements attributing to him a very active role in leading the insurrection such as "Walker assumed command of the crowd." A jury in Fort Worth awarded an $800,000 judgment against the Associated Press, ruling that malice was intended.

The offensive was also being taken up by Republicans in Congress in an alliance with Southern Democrats, who wanted to embarrass Attorney General Robert Kennedy because of his civils rights activities. The House Judiciary Committee voted on September 1, 1964 by a margin of 18 to 14 to open an investigation of the Justice Department's handling of cases including, but not limited to, those of Jimmy Hoffa, Roy M. Cohn, and former Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker. The vote among Republican and Southern Democratic committee members was 16-2; that of non-Southern Democrats was 2-12.

Meanwhile, a Louisiana jury awarded Walker $3 million in damages in another one of his libel suits."

---------------------------------

Kennedy was now dead, Walker seemed to begin to fade from public view:

---------------------------------

"His luck started to turn sour however, and finally on June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court ruled 9-0 extending the constitutional protection of freedom of the press to libelous falsehoods about private individuals who willingly take part in public affairs. Such protections were already in place concerning libel against political officials, but this was a landmark case extending the applicability to private individuals who willingly venture into the public arena. Walker's awards were overturned.

Chief Justice Warren explained, "Our citizenry has a legitimate and substantial interest in the conduct of such persons... Freedom of the press to engage in uninhibited debate about their involvement in public issues should be subject to derogatory criticism, even when based on false statements."

Walker's name occasionally surfaced in the press after this, usually in connection with anti-UN activities or in connection with the presidential campaign of George Wallace."

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By 1965 Walker seems to have made at least $3,800,000.00 minus costs on his activities as 'anti communist assett'

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In 1957, General Walker was actually credited with furthering the cause of racial integration after he led federal troops integrating the schools in Little Rock, Ark. Actually, Gen. Walker led the troops only after President Eisenhower refused his resignation, historian Don E. Carleton, author of Red Scare, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. "He did not want to carry out that order," Mr. Carleton said. "He did not believe in racial integration" (General Walker obituary, AP release, November 2, 1993).

General Edwin A. Walker resigned from the Army in November 1961 after he was chastised by the Pentagon for distributing Birch Society propaganda to his troops. He was temporarily relieved of command, pending an investigation. Walker - a Bircher, also was the head of Committee for the Defense of Christian Culture, and the general once made a bid for governor but finished last in the 1962 Democratic runoff.

In 1962, Dallas officials of the John Birch Society attended a meeting with H.L Hunt, General Edwin Walker, Robert Morris (leader of the Defenders of American Liberty, president of Plato University in New Jersey and former chief counsel for the U.S. Senate Internal Security Subcommittee), and Larrie Schmidt.

Late in September, 1962, James Meredith was seeking to become the first black ever admitted to the University of Mississippi. Mississippi governor Ross Barnett set out to block it, and Kennedy ordered National Guardsmen deployed on Meredith's behalf. That was when General Walker called for ten thousand civilians to march on Oxford, Mississippi, in opposition.

[Kennedy and Bobby had been involved in intense negotiations to get Barnett to back down, and it was only after they informed him that they had been taping the phone conversations that Barnett appeared to back down. However on the day Walker was bunkered down in Oxford directing operations and the highway partrol that Barnett was supposed to be controlling were letting Walkers men into the war zone.

Walker was on the scene when rioting erupted against four hundred federal marshals escorting Meredith onto the campus." Two people were killed in the melee, and 70 were wounded. The next morning, "Walker was arrested by federal authorities on four counts, including insurrection, and flown for psychiatric observation to the Medical Center for Federal Prisoners at Springfield, Missouri."

The Liberty Lobby hastened to General Walker's defense, and blamed the Kennedys for waging a campaign against Walker to "reduce his prestige" and "asset value to the anti-Communist cause".

Walker flew the U.S. flag upside down to express his rage over the perceived "communist" leanings of Kennedy and other government officials, according to Darwin Payne, a former Dallas newspaper reporter. "He was not a good speaker. He was a poor campaigner and finished last in a field of six [in the gubernatorial race], which was a surprise because he had so many ardent followers in the right wing," Mr. Payne says (Walker obituary)."

The JBS waged its grass-roots, populist approach to psychological warfare with much scape-goating. In The Radical Right (Random House, 1967), Epstein and Arnold offer that at the 1965 convention of the Christian Crusade, another fascist front, General Walker, "in speaking of the man who killed Lee Harvey Oswald, President Kennedy's assassin, urged his listeners not to forget that Ruby's name was Rubenstein, and they can't change that fact no matter how often they refer to him as Ruby."

______________________

With so much backing and involvement it's hard to credit an idea that Walker was short of a quid.

Edited by John Dolva
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  • 7 months later...

topical bump

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Good stuff, John.

I don't have anything regarding Walker's financial position but he certainly moved in interesting circles to state the obvious.

When Walker was on tour with Billy James Hargis and the Christian Crusade, he shared the stage with a Cuban exile by the name of Fernando Penabaz. Penabaz wrote a book on Hargis and made a big spalsh by speaking about Russian missiles which were allegedly submerged under the ocean about 40 miles west of Havana. This was backed up by Alexander Rorke who in a Miami press conference independently supported this information.

Penabaz is someone of great interest. He was an associate of Manuel Artime and relayed the false story about Oswald meeting with a Cuban Intel officer in Nicaragua; information supplied by other Artime associates Sixto Mesa and Miguel De Leon.

Penabaz was also well acquainted with Frank Sturgis and was Bud Fensterwald's source when it came to him.

Penabaz was also closely associated with a character by the name of Max Salazar. Salazar was a Episcopal rector and knew General Walker who was a Episcopalian himself. I am left to wonder if Max Salazar was the Salazar who rented the house on Harlandale.

If one Googles Fernando Penabaz, there is little on offer but he was so admired by the exile community in Miami that they named a street after him.

FWIW.

James

Edited by James Richards
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John : Keep in mind ,there is no evidence that Walker was sitting at his desk ,when the bullet passed through his window, we only have Walker's word on that....which ain't worth much. That night was one of the few nights he was ''alone '', although Hemming says otherwise, he has offered no proof to this claim.

Bill

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Good stuff, John.

I don't have anything regarding Walker's financial position but he certainly moved in interesting circles to state the obvious.

When Walker was on tour with Billy James Hargis and the Christian Crusade, he shared the stage with a Cuban exile by the name of Fernando Penabaz. Penabaz wrote a book on Hargis and made a big spalsh by speaking about Russian missiles which were allegedly submerged under the ocean about 40 miles west of Havana. This was backed up by Alexander Rorke who in a Miami press conference independently supported this information.

Penabaz is someone of great interest. He was an associate of Manuel Artime and relayed the false story about Oswald meeting with a Cuban Intel officer in Nicaragua; information supplied by other Artime associates Sixto Mesa and Miguel De Leon.

Penabaz was also well acquainted with Frank Sturgis and was Bud Fensterwald's source when it came to him.

Penabaz was also closely associated with a character by the name of Max Salazar. Salazar was a Episcopal rector and knew General Walker who was a Episcopalian himself. I am left to wonder if Max Salazar was the Salazar who rented the house on Harlandale.

If one Googles Fernando Penabaz, there is little on offer but he was so admired by the exile community in Miami that they named a street after him.

FWIW.

James

I have only one response to the material presented by Mr Dolva, [which is ultimately at the epicenter of the interesting circles as James so tactfully phrased it .] Which is, a quote.

"The only thing new in this world is the history you don't know." President Harry S. Truman

As a point of reference, the other day I had the experience of wading through a host of stories about Edwin Walker, and, other figures of the era, all of which were from 1961-1964. Amid the multitude of thoughts that crossed my mind was how examining the articles was akin to reading about a covert operation, [at least re: Walker] the other figures, primarily from the sordid world of politics impressed upon me the fact that the dynamic of partisan politic's Republican and Democrat, Tory and Labor.... [the inevitable third parties that never (usually) have the majority needed to accomplish anything [outside of their own agenda's, sometime's noble sometime's not, other than playing the spoiler] present a pseudo-illusory reality to the everyman and everywoman of each era. It is in a sense, like watching a movie, where all the actor's are politicians, sometimes in actuality truly expressing themselves and sometimes playing a role. The real dynamic of real politics is about manipulating what you know and what actual power you posess into more knowledge and more power, and more money. For instance a certain politician in 1964 was referencing a spy scandal of the era and was taking what information he possessed and using it [whether rightly or wrongly, in the moral sense, I am not privy to know, but would assume the latter] to attack the opposition for not knowing what was going on in their own proverbial house, if you will. The politician was doing what politicians do, ostensibly. So the whole disconnect from reality is in the fact that it is a bit like a chess match or even a football game, where when the game or match, is over, the parties all sit down and share brandy, scotch a glass of wine and a choice cigar and talk like ordinary folk do, unless you literally hate your opponent and then I suppose, something else happens. Where does this all lead up to?

Q. What is the first thing that happens when a democracy or something close to it, is replaced with a totalitarian form of government.

A. They round up the intellectuals, of course.

What is the single dynamic that is the most responsible for what is ailing America at the moment, outside of rampant corruption in Washington? [just my opinion but one shared by academics and scholar's] A compromised media [excluding indy-media] that is too complacent, cowed or corrupt too call it like it is. Once mass media, [in this case the networks and the cable conglemorates,] becomes indifferent to human suffering and/or rampant corruption, then....if you are well versed in actual history, you hope like hell your wrong.

I certainly did not grow up aspiring to be a pessimist, but optimism 'at this juncture' strikes me a bit like re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic.

As a final note: Bill O'Reilly he of the No Spin Zone, was once a TV newsman in Dallas, TX who went to J. Walton Moore's office when 'it became known that he [Moore] was in the loop, [so to speak] when it came to George DeMohrenschildt, ostensible de-briefing of you know who; O'Reilly practically camped out at Dallas CIA HQ's waiting for the big interview, to get to the truth about the 'Kennedy Assassination and the CIA's connection to Oswald. Look at him now doing the 'right wing Geraldo' routine, which all goes to show the 'futility of having knowledge, without the framework to improve a leaking, rotting status-quo, or worse.'

Edited by Robert Howard
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Mr. LIEBELER. Do you recall speaking--pardon me, not speaking, but going to any meetings of anti-Castro Cuban groups during the month of October 1963?

General WALKER. During What month?

Mr. LIEBELER. October.

General WALKER. I don't remember a date of attendance.

Mr. LIEBELER. Isn't it a fact that there were some meetings here in Dallas sponsored by an organization known as DRE, which is a revolutionary group that is opposed to Fidel Castro? Do you remember that?

General WALKER. What does DRE stand for?

Mr. LIEBELER. It is the initials of a lot of Spanish words which stands for the Student Revolutionary Council. It is an anti-Castro organization.

General WALKER. What does DRE stand for? How would they have advertised themselves?

Mr. LIEBELER. I think it is probably DRE.

General WALKER. Meaning what?

Mr. LIEBELER. It is Spanish words I am not familiar with.

General WALKER. Well, there is a student directorate group, which I remember they call themselves, and that is the way they identified themselves. I attended a meeting sometime and listened to some speakers.

Mr. LIEBELER. They came from Miami?

General WALKER. I believe they came from Miami.

Mr. LIEBELER. And you contributed $5 to the organization that night?

General WALKER. I believe I did.

Five bucks! Is that all he could afford...? About as believeable as the so-called assassination attempt on him.

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Greg,

I am wondering if you have the date of that interview? I'm curious about Walker playing dumb regarding the DRE as in May of 1964, Carlos Bringuier was part of the speaking tour headed by Billy James Hargis; which of course also featured Walker.

James

Edited by James Richards
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WALKER PATRIOTS IN SERVICE, Nov. 1961: An orthodontist in Midland, Texas, fundraising for General Walker

http://www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents...|3|1|1|1|71820|

(scroll down to link to page 2)

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Greg,

I am wondering if you have the date of that interview? I'm curious about Walker playing dumb regarding the DRE as in May of 1964, Carlos Bringuier was part of the speaking tour headed by Billy James Hargis; which of course also featured Walker.

James

James, right on the money. Walker's testimony was taken in Dallas on July 23, 1964.

Three days before he left office last January former President Eisenhower said in a nation-wide television address, "In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist." I believe Mr. Eisenhower's warning is pertinent to this situation. In the course of our history we have always maintained civilian control of our government by elected officials responsible to the electorate. I firmly believe that this must continue. Morris Udall on Walker, beating Stone by some 30 years in quoting Ike's final address, and in doing so, showing a perfect example of what the address might mean to the future.

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To John Dolva:

Many Forum readers will agree that this is a very powerful and succinct thread

and I thank you for your research into this.

These questions about General Ed Walker form real core consensus for us in the same

way the Eladio del Valle /DeTorres /Martinez/ Sturgis/ Barker/Hunt tactical team form a strong

set of theoretical problems and beliefs.

Sounds like a wild program to overthrow under color of law, a palace manipulation for power.

When Lee and Harvey Oswald cross paths with the provocative traitor/martyr

and division general Edwin Walker -----------------------------------------------------JFK 11/63

The FRAME was hit I believe, of ED WALKER's window I understand.

Edwin Walker was a sponsor and he had sponsors and he was a veteran of false games,

and the charges tie in with some members' theories and beliefs.

Great assistance in keeping us focused and

a GREAT JFK THREAD.

:ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r:

Edited by Shanet Clark
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Thank's Shanet. All are most welcome. The snippets I've cobbled together from other researchers work is out there independent of me which is a good thing I think.

I was pleasantly surprised to come across this story in 'Clarion Ledger' (MSC files) from late 1961, about four high school students in Jackson,Mississippi, facing off against Walker, Barnett, Thompson, Williams and '50 prominent citizens'. They told the police when questioned that they were 'interested in preventing this country from being taken over by the military'. They also must have taken Eisenhowers warning to heart.

Edited by John Dolva
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Greg,

I am wondering if you have the date of that interview? I'm curious about Walker playing dumb regarding the DRE as in May of 1964, Carlos Bringuier was part of the speaking tour headed by Billy James Hargis; which of course also featured Walker.

James

James, right on the money. Walker's testimony was taken in Dallas on July 23, 1964.

Three days before he left office last January former President Eisenhower said in a nation-wide television address, "In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist." I believe Mr. Eisenhower's warning is pertinent to this situation. In the course of our history we have always maintained civilian control of our government by elected officials responsible to the electorate. I firmly believe that this must continue. Morris Udall on Walker, beating Stone by some 30 years in quoting Ike's final address, and in doing so, showing a perfect example of what the address might mean to the future.

Thanks, Greg.

I think it is obvious that by July of 1964, Walker was well and truly aware of what the DRE was.

Cheers,

James

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Greg,

I am wondering if you have the date of that interview? I'm curious about Walker playing dumb regarding the DRE as in May of 1964, Carlos Bringuier was part of the speaking tour headed by Billy James Hargis; which of course also featured Walker.

James

James, right on the money. Walker's testimony was taken in Dallas on July 23, 1964.

Three days before he left office last January former President Eisenhower said in a nation-wide television address, "In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist." I believe Mr. Eisenhower's warning is pertinent to this situation. In the course of our history we have always maintained civilian control of our government by elected officials responsible to the electorate. I firmly believe that this must continue. Morris Udall on Walker, beating Stone by some 30 years in quoting Ike's final address, and in doing so, showing a perfect example of what the address might mean to the future.

Thanks, Greg.

I think it is obvious that by July of 1964, Walker was well and truly aware of what the DRE was.

Cheers,

James

I would like to mention a possible information source on locating pertinent stories concerning Walker, Billy James Hargis and the Christian Crusade et cetera. The Dallas Times Herald, unfortunately, the Herald which was 'the alternative' to the stridency of G.B. Dealey's Dallas Morning News. G.B. Dealey made some very outrageous statements criticizing JFK during a news media gathering in Washington circa 1961-63.

[The DMN purchased the Dallas Times Herald in the early 1990's] and I have discovered they have quite a bit of archived material concerning the topic of this thread. I would urge all Forum members who use their city libraries to explore the possibility their library may have both the DTH or DMN newspapers on microfiche or hopefully something like CD ROM/DVD.

Another potential source is the ERIC [and similar databases] in which, in the privacy of your own home one potentially can access these various databases via computer through the use of their library card number and a library administrated PIN. This is not to mention various Universities and Colleges which also possess archival material, [in the latter case I am referring to JFK Archival Material other than Edwin Walker].

Also, a few years back circa, 1995 a JFK researcher mentioned a very frustrating experience he had in trying to locate and obtain a copy of a JFK Assassination document entitled something to the effect of 'CIA Activities in Dallas - 1963.'

The story basically was, that he discovered a reference to the document doing research and after a wild goose chase discovered, that the document was not in the National Archives, but in the hands of the Gerald Ford Library in Michigan!

He contacted the administrator/curator who proceeded to tell him that even though the document was indeed, at the Gerald Ford Library, the researcher would not be able to look at it, much less obtain a copy, as it was the possession of the Gerald Ford Library and did not fall under the provisions of the F.O.I.A. [Never mind that the document would, hopefully be pried loose from the Library's hands if an impartial judge were handling the case, that is, if it hasn't disappeared, or isn't redacted to pieces.]

I have never heard anything else about this does anyone have any information regarding this? I apologize for not remembering the researchers name, but surely someone is familiar with this document's history on the Forum and could offer information.

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All

I will be redundant in my post here.

You will never see the true Walker until you search beyond 1957, Little Rock and how General Walker got to where he arrived.

The old saying, "you can't see the forest for the trees." has never been truer when it comes to Walker. His Warren Commission Testimony is just one example of his ability to twist, turn and rearrange words to bypass providing any real information.

What is perhaps more important about Walker's Testimony is that not one Warren Commissioner was in attendance during the interview. Strange when you read the summary of the WC Report and see how much emphisis they placed on the Walker assassination attempt in painting a picture of the "Lone Nut," Oswald.

Perhaps the Commissioners choose to miss this important testimony because McCloy had corresponded with Walker just five months prior to the assassination. Perhaps they excused themselves because Walker had been envolved in two specific WWII missions that McCloy, as Asst. Sec. of War, took a specific interest in. Perhaps it was uncomfortable to be in the same room with Walker because Walker could be associated with John B. Hurt who could also be associated with John J. McCloy and perhaps even Lee Harvey Oswald.

Major General Edwin Anderson Walker is an enigma within the assassination story perhaps even greater than Oswald himself yet never studied to any great degree beyond his involvement in "right wing" organizations.

As a group, conspiracy theorist seem to ignore, excuse or downplay any connections to Walker. Dispite this fact almost anyone with a knowledge of how the military works would have to admit that you could not attain the position of Major General without being connected to many persons which are in the very highest echelons of both the military and the government. Dispite this we find that during the muzzling of the military hearings Walker did not once defend his position by attempting to blame those higher up on the military food chain. He did, of course, make accusations toward the President and those who held civilian control over the government. But the leader of that civilian control, John F. Kennedy would soon be dead.

Please get beyond Walker's "right wing" activites and look more closely at his military career, his intelligence connections and his whole life work if you are truely interested in understanding Walker the man.

Jim Root

Edited by Jim Root
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