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Jefferson Morley's Thoughts on Case


Tim Gratz
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From the "Washington Post" Book World.

An interesting read.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...5112800596.html

******************

The best Q & A in the interview:

California: Greetings,

Remember when the only stories about the assassination appeared in sleazy men's magazines? Do any of the new books on the assassination include any girly pictorials?

Thanks

Jefferson Morley: No.

Just kidding. He has a lot of perceptive comments, except he just doesn't get it: Castro did it, Jeff!

Edited by Tim Gratz
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From the "Washington Post" Book World.

An interesting read.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/conte...5112800596.html

... He has a lot of perceptive comments, except he just doesn't get it: Castro did it, Jeff![/i]

Actually, it is an interesting and fairly well-balanced discussion. I think Morley's most perceptive comment, however, is:

Stone's critics in the mainstream media would enhance their credibility with the conspiracy-minded public if they demanded that the government obey the JFK Records Act with the same vehemence that they denounce Stone.

:tomatoes

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Actually Tim regarding the pulp-- this is a great comment on the way stories made it (almost) to the mainstream. The Martino bk (today a collectors item), Weyl's books perhaps and stuff like Youngblood's dime store novel (cover price 50 cents today worth 25 dollars) and the articles about operations in Swank, http://www.cuban-exile.com/doc_276-300/doc0287.html , this article from Stag mag all the "man media" available at time are fascinating sources and should be considered by good researchers as are articles in LIFE and other big ones. Soldier of Fortune is also a good source of stories of action and intrigue. I have an old Flying mag that gives backgrnd of air ops in Guatemala before that story was fully unraveled. There were numerous manuscripts to be published that didn't make it that could reveal a lot of data to researchers. First hand stories that are gathering dust in personal collections gone unread (in some cases stolen) is a tragedy IMO.

From Morley “If you look at the history of Cuban revolutionary politics from 1954 to 1964, Castro and his advisers consistently rejected assassination as a political tactic. They were not averse to killing their foes, they just didn't think that eliminating a single man was an effective way to achieve their goals.”

I’m bit confused on that To be fair there were surely wish lists of those who could be eliminated on both sides for political effect. Many such docs are unclassified and can be viewed by any researcher. The frus docs on web show US side’s objectives but to think Cuba didn’t have such a trail of documentation is a little naïve. We haven’t seen perhaps the rest of the data that exists from that corner so statement seems premature in that assumption. After all revolutions are political events and elimination is the main feature.

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