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Lyndon Johnson and the Assassination of JFK


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Guest Robert Morrow

LIFE Magazine was not the only media outlet that Robert Kennedy was turning on Lyndon Johnson in the fall of 1963. The Kennedys were in the process of politically executing Lyndon Johnson; and they were very close to it on 11/22/63.

http://home.earthlin...oor/brennen.htm

Phil Brennan:

“For the most part, the Washington press corps kept the lid on the story - until the

late Bob Humphrey, then the GOP Senate leadership's spokesman, an incredibly gifted strategist and a mentor, asked me to tell the story to the late Delaware Republican Sen. John Williams, a crusader for good government and a crackerjack of an investigator.

Sen. Williams asked me to introduce him to Hill and I did. They got together with some Senate investigators for the GOP minority and Hill told them the whole story, including the part played by Vice President Johnson. Williams got his committee to launch an investigation and the lid came off.

A few days later, the attorney general, Bobby Kennedy, called five of Washington's top reporters into his office and told them it was now open season on Lyndon Johnson. It's OK, he told them, to go after the story they were ignoring out of deference to the administration.

And from that point on until the events in Dallas, Lyndon Baines Johnson's future

looked as if it included a sudden end to his political career and a few years in the slammer. The Kennedys had their knives out and sharpened for him and were determined to draw his political blood - all of it.

In the Senate, the investigation into the Baker case was moving quickly ahead. Even the Democrats were cooperating, thanks to the Kennedys, and an awful lot of really bad stuff was being revealed - until Nov. 22, 1963.

By Nov. 23, all Democrat cooperation suddenly stopped. Lyndon would serve a

term and a half in the White House instead of the slammer, the Baker investigation would peter out and Bobby Baker would serve a short sentence and go free. Dallas accomplished all of that. “

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Guest Robert Morrow

Noel Twyman and I are friends. He lives in North San Diego County... the Fairbanks Ranch area of Rancho Santa Fe. Do not misinterpret his meaning, Robert. Noel does not believe that LBJ was the "mastermind" of anything.

I did not say that Noel Twyman thought that Lyndon Johnson was the "mastermind" of the JFK assassination. But I think Twymann would certainly agree that Lyndon Johnson was part of the cabal to murder John Kennedy and that LBJ was not some sort of mere facilitator of the cover up. At the very least Twymann strongly suspects Johnson's participation and may have changed his views based on Nelson's fine "LBJ: The Mastermind of the JFK Assassination."

Twymann in "Bloody Treason" has a chapter devoted to Lyndon Johnson: Chapter 31 beginning on p. 790.

Twymann also conducted an extensive interview of Madeleine Brown, which he put in Appendix A, p. 844.

Here is a good place to buy the fabulous book "Bloody Treason" cheaply: http://www.amazon.co...98&sr=8-2-spell

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Guest Robert Morrow

And as far as the Senate Rules Committee, I may be wrong about Robert Kennedy feeding them damaging information about Johnson. Not that RFK would have minded that, but his primary goal was defense and making sure that John Kennedy was not implicated with any of Bobby Baker's women, particularly Ellen Rometsch. I think RFK's problem was how do I politically execute Lyndon Johnson, while at the same time keeping his brother Jack free from scandal. "How do I thread this needle?" no doubt RFK was asking himself on this one.

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Bobby_Baker

Wiki:

"In a biography of Robert Kennedy, author Evan Thomas described an arrangement in which the President's brother, and then Attorney General, Robert Kennedy, was able to arrange a deal with J. Edgar Hoover in order to quell the Senate investigation of Bobby Baker. This prevented public scrutiny of Baker from causing exposure of President Kennedy's involvement with Ellen Rometsch. Hoover successfully limited the Senate investigation of Baker by threatening to release embarrassing information about senators contained in FBI files. In exchange for this, Robert Kennedy reassured Hoover that his job as FBI Director was secure and also agreed to allow the FBI to proceed with wiretaps that Hoover had requested, including wiretaps of political activists such as Martin Luther King.[7]"

The Senate Rules Committe was coming dangerously close to wiping out Lyndon Johnson, with or without Robert Kennedy's help:

John Simkin:

"Don B. Reynolds appeared before a secret session of the Senate Rules Committee on 22nd November, 1963. Reynolds told B. Everett Jordan and his committee that Johnson had demanded that he provided kickbacks in return for him agreeing to a life insurance policy arranged by him in 1957. This included a $585 Magnavox stereo. Reynolds also had to pay for $1,200 worth of advertising on KTBC, Johnson's television station in Austin. Reynolds had paperwork for this transaction including a delivery note that indicated the stereo had been sent to the home of Johnson. Reynolds also told of seeing a suitcase full of money which Baker described as a "$100,000 payoff to Johnson for his role in securing the Fort Worth TFX contract"."

I think it goes without saying that if Robert Kennedy was telling the elite of the Washington, DC press corps (as per Phil Brennan) that it was open season on Lyndon Johnson, RFK would certainly have been telling Democrats up on Capital Hill, especially the ones not allied with Lyndon Johnson, that is was ok - or even a goal - to take out Lyndon Johnson.

Note: JFK friend Republican John Sherman Cooper (later on the Warren Commission) was also on the Senate Rules Committee. It is not a big stretch to think that the Kennedy brothers were telling him to do all he could to get rid of Lyndon Johnson.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Bobby Baker told Don Reynolds on 1/20/61 that the "s.o.b. John Kennedy" would never live out his term and that he would die a violent death

Bobby Baker, one of Lyndon Johnson’s closest associates, said this during the inauguration of John Kennedy

(11) Edward Jay Epstein, Esquire Magazine (December, 1966)

In January of 1964 the Warren Commission learned that Don B. Reynolds, insurance agent and close associate of Bobby Baker, had been heard to say the FBI knew that Johnson was behind the assassination. When interviewed by the FBI, he denied this. But he did recount an incident during the swearing in of Kennedy in which Bobby Baker said words to the effect that the s.o.b. would never live out his term and that he would die a violent death.”

Note from Robert Morrow: I think what Don Reynolds what *really* heard was Bobby Baker openly saying that Lyndon Johnson would have Kennedy murdered... and he was saying it on Inauguration Day, 1961. That is why I think it is so ridiculous to say that John Kennedy wanted Lyndon Johnson on his ticket. There was much bad blood already between JFK and LBJ and Kennedy only put him on the ticket under duress of the strongarm tactics of LBJ/Sam Rayburn on 7/13/60 in Los Angeles.

Remember Bobby Baker was like a son to LBJ; he would know the man's true feelings.

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All bolds added.

I did not say that Noel Twyman thought that Lyndon Johnson was the "mastermind" of the JFK assassination. But I think Twymann would certainly agree that Lyndon Johnson was part of the cabal to murder John Kennedy and that LBJ was not some sort of mere facilitator of the cover up. At the very least Twymann strongly suspects Johnson's participation and may have changed his views based on Nelson's fine "LBJ: The Mastermind of the JFK Assassination."

Twymann in "Bloody Treason" has a chapter devoted to Lyndon Johnson: Chapter 31 beginning on p. 790.

From Bloody Treason, pages 824, 833

Although some researchers believe that Johnson was the mastermind of the assassination, I am not inclined to believe it. I am inclined to believe

that the assassination grew out of a general revolt among Kennedy's enemies and that Johnson was brought in as a necessary part of the plot.

....Hoover and Johnson were brought into the plot. Their role was to prevent a serious investigation of the crime.

Very likely hundreds of powerful people were glad to see it happen; some even suspected it. But only three or four people needed to know the full nature of the plot.

Even Johnson and Hoover did not need to know the details - just their roles in a cover-up if required of them.

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Guest Robert Morrow

I would be interested to see if Noel Twymann has modified his views, more towards incriminating Lyndon Johnson, of the JFK based on his reading Phil Nelson's "LBJ: The Mastermind of the JFK Assassination."

One of his friends should directly ask Twymann this question. I would be interested in hearing his reply.

If Twymann thinks Lyndon Johnson was a "necessary" part of the JFK assassination, then that would be giving Lyndon Johnson a pretty big role in the murder of John Kennedy.

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Guest Robert Morrow

Lyndon Johnson by 1960 was losing some of his power as Democratic Majority Leader and Robert Novak was writing about it in his columns. LBJ wanted to be president, but he feared he would lose of John Kennedy if he competed with JFK in the primaries of spring, 1960. LBJ's plan was to win it all in smoked filled backrooms in Los Angeles, with Senators and congressmen being power brokers for him.

Obviously, that went on to fail.

Here is on of Robert Novak's anecdotes about LBJ during this time. Robert Novak ended up marrying a secretary to Lyndon Johnson and in fact LBJ threw a party for them.

Robert Novak on LBJ on March 31, 1960: "drunk as a loon"

But LBJ knew what I was writing about him as indicated in a bizarre incident two months after my liberal revolt column. Late in the evening of March 31, 1960, I was drinking in the Members Bar of the Press Club with my good friend Bob Jensen of the Buffalo Evening News (as I often did after my marriage collapsed). Somebody burst into the bar to say LBJ was in the club's ballroom, "drunk as a loon." Jensen and I went to check.

The report was not exaggerated. Johnson was attending the seventieth birthday celebration of Bascom Timmons, a famous Texas journalist who headed his own Washington news bureau. To my surprise, found the majority leader without aides or limo. LBJ, who until then showed little interest in me and absolutely no affection, spotted me and wrapped one of his long arms around me. "Bob," I like ("lahk" was the Texas pronunciation) you," he drawled drunkenly, "but you don't like me." He chanted it over and over, embracing me and swirling me in a little dance.

Celebrants at the Timmons birthday party, mostly Texans, were as drunk as Johnson, and uninterested in saving the majority leader from embarrassment. So, Bob Jensen and I guided the much taller man to the elevator, down to the National Press Building's 14th Street lobby, and out into a taxi to be taken home.

The next day, a cool, immaculately groomed Senator Johnson was seated, as usual, in the majority leader's chair on the Senate floor prior to the noon convening time. That was the only time reporters were permitted on the floor, huddled around Johnson's chair for five minutes of questions and answers. Johnson often, as he did on this occasion, kept his eyes down reading what was in front of him and then looked up suddenly, registering seeming surprise at seeing himself surrounded by reporters. When he did that this time, he stared at me, exclaiming: "Well, Novak, saw you at the Press Club last night. Got a little drunk out, didn't it?" The other reporters chuckled appreciatively, thinking it was I who had been "a little drunk," as LBJ intended.

[Robert Novak, "The Prince of Darkness: 50 Years of Reporting in Washington," p. 56-57]

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I had dinner with Noel in Dallas quite a number of years ago. During the meal we spoke about many things, such as, our mutual friend and source, Hemming. We also spoke about Noel's having met and spent considerable time with Robert McNamara, and we spoke at length about LBJ, among other things. Both of us had a similar experience while separately talking to Texans about the assassination. We had both noted that Texans were far and away the most likely to believe that LBJ was actually BEHIND the assassination. Several seasoned Texas researchers with whom I am acquainted as well as two very close researcher friends from Texas all told me that at the time of the assassination they were CONVINCED that LBJ had murdered Kennedy to further his own career. One person who believed this back in 1963-64 was Jack White. For many Texans it was a forgone conclusion that "LBJ did it..." -- Today Jack is not of that same mindset. The more educated one becomes about the subject the less likely such a scenario becomes.

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Guest Robert Morrow

I had dinner with Noel in Dallas quite a number of years ago. During the meal we spoke about many things, such as, our mutual friend and source, Hemming. We also spoke about Noel's having met and spent considerable time with Robert McNamara, and we spoke at length about LBJ, among other things. Both of us had a similar experience while separately talking to Texans about the assassination. We had both noted that Texans were far and away the most likely to believe that LBJ was actually BEHIND the assassination. Several seasoned Texas researchers with whom I am acquainted as well as two very close researcher friends from Texas all told me that at the time of the assassination they were CONVINCED that LBJ had murdered Kennedy to further his own career. One person who believed this back in 1963-64 was Jack White. For many Texans it was a forgone conclusion that "LBJ did it..." -- Today Jack is not of that same mindset. The more educated one becomes about the subject the less likely such a scenario becomes.

I don't know exactly what Jack White thinks about the JFK assassination in 2012, but here is what he thought in 2004: that Lyndon Johnson murdered John Kennedy. Jack White also said that he found Madeleine Brown to be an extremely convincing and credible witness as do most people who spent a lot of time with her.

http://www.spartacus...KwhiteJ.htmJack White, statement on the assassination of John F. Kennedy (31st March, 2004)

(1) President Kennedy was murdered by a cabal headed by Lyndon Johnson, Allen Dulles, J. Edgar Hoover and Richard Nixon. The CIA and Pentagon carried out the hit... with help from Cubans and mobsters.

(2) Lee Oswald and Harvey Oswald were agents of the CIA and did not kill JFK. Both were controlled by the CIA.

(3) Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King were killed by the same cabal. Similar fate befell several others who threatened the cabal, such as George Wallace, Larry Flynt, John Lennon and Marilyn Monroe. Teddy Kennedy and Richard Nixon also were "eliminated" by the cabal. An attempt on the life of President Reagan tried to install G.H.W. Bush as president, but it failed, and Bush One had to wait his turn. Gerald Ford was installed as president because he was a willing stooge of the cabal.

(4) It is scientifically provable that the Zapruder film of the JFK assassination is a fabrication by the government.

Jack White, JFK Research Assassination Forum(2nd April, 2004)

"On 11-22-63 I was certain it was LBJ and cronies. For the next 30 years I read every book and watched every TV show, and considered... the CIA, the Mafia, the Cubans, the Russians, the Secret Service... you name it, I considered it. But I knew it was not a lone nut kid named Oswald. By about 1990 I was back where I started. I was certain it was LBJ and friends.

Over the years, logic prevailed. Who benefited most? Who had the motive, means, opportunity? Who could cover up the crime? Who could control the autopsy? Who could control the investigations and the investigators? Who could control the evidence and suppress or change it? Who could fabricate evidence in the hands of the FBI? Who could control the media? Who could control the public? Who could control the patsy? Who could fabricate the Zabruder film? Certainly not Dulles... Giancana... Castro... Kruschev... etc.

ANSWER: THE POWER OF THE PRESIDENCY.... especially a venal and corrupt president and his friends, backers, and cronies. Lyndon Baines Johnson. He controlled Texas. He controlled Dallas. He controlled Hoover. He controlled Dulles. He controlled the military. He controlled Warren and the commission. He had alliances with the mafia and the media. He and Hoover used BLACKMAIL and murder to control those he could not control. Hoover fabricated evidence for him. Hoover was his next door neighbor. He allied himself with Hoover, Dullles, Nixon and his backers in the oil/military industrial complex/CIA/military to carry out the murder.

That is the truth. It was so obvious all along. One of the most corrupt men in all of history... LBJ."

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Guest Robert Morrow

Jack White, statement on the assassination of John F. Kennedy (31st March, 2004):

"President Kennedy was murdered by a cabal headed by Lyndon Johnson, Allen Dulles, J. Edgar Hoover and Richard Nixon. The CIA and Pentagon carried out the hit... with help from Cubans and mobsters."

My opinion: I agree with much of that except I do not think Richard Nixon was involved in the JFK assassination, although he knew the truth about the "whole Bay of Pigs thing."

I think Jack White in 2012 would add in the Rockefellers to the list of perps in the JFK assassination. I personally am very suspicious of the Rockefellers as well as LBJ's Texas oil men. They cross-pollinated business, politics and intelligence.

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Guest Robert Morrow

I do know that when I posted passage one time, Jack White expressed agreement with it. I have always thought that this passage had a lot of truth in it:

From Defrauding America, Rodney Stich, 3rd edition 1998 p. 638-639]:

“The Role of deep-cover CIA officer, Trenton Parker, has been described in earlier pages, and his function in the CIA's counter-intelligence unit, Pegasus. Parker had stated to me earlier that a CIA faction was responsible for the murder of JFK … During an August 21, 1993, conversation, in response to my questions, Parker said that his Pegasus group had tape recordings of plans to assassinate Kennedy. I asked him, "What group were these tapes identifying?" Parker replied: "Rockefeller, Allen Dulles, Johnson of Texas, George Bush, and J. Edgar Hoover." I asked, "What was the nature of the conversation on these tapes?"

I don't have the tapes now, because all the tape recordings were turned over to [Congressman] Larry McDonald. But I listened to the tape recordings and there were conversations between Rockefeller, [J. Edgar] Hoover, where [Nelson] Rockefeller asks, "Are we going to have any problems?" And he said, "No, we aren't going to have any problems. I checked with Dulles. If they do their job we'll do our job." There are a whole bunch of tapes, because Hoover didn't realize that his phone has been tapped. Defrauding America, Rodney Stich, 3rd edition p. 638-639]

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Guest Robert Morrow

Here is some more information on the LBJ vs. Kennedys antagonisms:

Joseph Califano on how the Kennedys treated Lyndon Johnson

“I knew how rude and demeaning some of Kennedy’s staff had been to LBJ. Kennedy’s appointments secretary Kenneth O’Donnell had insisted that the White House clear every request the Vice President made of the Pentagon, even the most routine. The Kennedy staff rarely gave Johnson more than five minutes’ notice of cabinet or National Security Council meetings, and often invited Vice President and Mrs. Johnson to social events at the last minute. On the few occasions when Vice President Johnson was asked to speak near the end of any meeting, he complained that Robert Kennedy would stand up to leave, and interrupt, “Well, this meeting has run much too long.” LBJ made no bones how miserable he was as Vice President.

Because of the way he’d been humiliated, I thought Johnson would treat Humphrey differently. And he did, for a brief time. But within weeks of Johnson’s inauguration, Jack Valenti told me that all vice presidential requests for support from the Pentagon, even those for routine items such as transportation or mess aides to serve meals, needed White House approval, an order that surely came from LBJ. Even this did not prepare me for my experiences on Johnson’s staff.”

[Joseph Califano, “The Tragedy & Triumph of Lyndon Johnson: The White House Years,” p. 64]

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