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Telephone Interview with Volkmar Schmidt. January, 1995. William E. Kelly

Kelly: Hello, Volkmar Schmidt?

Schmidt: Speaking.

K: I’m a journalist from Atlantic City and I’m affiliated with the Committee for an Open Archives in Washington D.C. First let me make sure I’m talking with the right Volkmar Schmidt. Were you friends with George DeMohrenschildt.

S: Yes. Who are you affiliated?

K: I’m a freelance writer and I’m associated with the Committee for an Open Archives, which lobbied for the release of the JFK assassination files that they are now releasing. I think it’s important as a journalist to try to track down as many witnesses as possible and talk with them to get as much information on the record as possible.

S: I have no problem with that at all.

K: I recently talked with Betty McDonald.

S: A wonderful lady. I think she has a new last name.

K: Yes, Miller. Do you have a few minutes to talk with me?

S: Absolutely, no problem.

K: Can you relate to me how you first came to meet DeMohrenschildt and Oswald?

S: I met the DeMohrenschilt through some of the people who worked with me at the research lab.

K: Magnolia?

S: Yes, Magnolia, or Mobil Oil. I think the fellow who got us in touch was Everett, Doctor Glover, and they knew that two of us at the research lab, Norm Fredrickson and myself wanted to study Russian. So we were introduced to them. I forget the details, but it was through the people at the FRL (?). Soon after I met them they arranged this dinner party at their place at which they invited Lee Harvey Oswald. That was the only time I met the Oswalds.

K: You talked with him at length that night?

S: Yes, I spent about two solid hours with him.

K: What was your impression of him?

S: The same impression as my colleagues had, who all met them because I had arranged a party after that for them to meet Lee Harvey Oswald and his family. I was gone on a lengthily business trip then. A very disturbed man. A man desperate, spiritually, totally desperate. That’s why I talked with him, to try to get him back to sanity. His determination to leave an imprint in history was just incredible. The warning flags went right off for me that this man was ready to explode and do harm to him and others. Specifically what flashed to me, the logical suicide of Dostoevsky, that story, a man is devoid of spiritual meaning in life, then the knowledge of power of intellect creates a great dilemma. That’s what Dostoevsky beautifully put down. So anyway, I had been around people who were even more disturbed during my youth because I grew up in the house of a psychiatrist.

K: I read in Epstein’s book that you studied in Heidelberg with Dr. Kuetemeyer?

S: I didn’t study medicine, my friend did, but I was in his house and saw how he treated patients, as many as he could in his big house, six sometimes. He had many dinners with psychotic people.

K: I was in Heidelberg when I was a student. It’s a beautiful town, with the castle on the hill.

S: My daughter is now studying just below the castle and is just as happy as a bird.

K: What happened to Kuetemeyer?

S: He died of a heart attack, the old man, and his son, my best friend, his son, committed suicide because of betrayal by his father. But I’m in close touch, they are like my family, with the mother, the wife of Professor Kuetemeyer, and his daughters, so whenever I go to Germany, which is about once every season.

K: I was in Berlin when the wall came down.

S: You are very lucky. I must admit that that was one occasion when I truly had to cry.

I never expected it to happen in my lifetime.

K: Epstein mentions that Kuetemeyer was involved in the July 20th plot to kill Hitler.

S: Not directly, but he was certainly, and many of his friends were in the circle of those who tried to kill Hitler, Stauffenberg, and several of his close friends were executed, and one of the sons of his friends, lived at his house and became and is still a very close friend of mine. Fritz from Holland.

K: IÕve been looking at some of the history books on that incident but didn’t come across his name.

S: Fritz first name Frederick, Von - the symbol of nobility, Von Halen. He was actually arrested before the plot came out. He knew about the plot and was tortured to death. And another gentleman who was involved was Von Trott, a friend of Kuetemeyer.

K: I was also reading how Carl Jung was trying to influence the situation and was wondering if Kuetemeyer and Jung were associated?

S: Yes, definitely, he definitely followed Jung and professor Whitesager (?). Dr. Kuetemeyer was a psychosomatic specialists, but he also followed Jung and he treated patients as a psychiatrist and he was also a professor of religion at Heidelberg. He lectured on literature and such.

K: And you studied with him?

S: I grew up in his house basically. My father had passed away and so half the time I stayed there, not overnight, but I had many, many dinners, and Prof. Kuetemeyer’s wife asked me to call her mother. It was mutual, I contributed something and they were very kind to me.

K: How did you come to Dallas?

S: I got a job with Magnolia in Germany because I worked for the German subsidiary as a co-op student in Germany, so they hired me after I graduated. They interviewed me in Paris and hired me on the strength of my thesis work.

K: DeMohrenschildt had some high praise for your work.

S: I didn’t know that.

K: On research on petroleum bearing rock formations?

S: Yes. I’m a specialist, and I’m still appreciated although I am ready to retire now.

K: Can you give me some more of your impressions of Oswald?

S: Oswald found out that if you really want to do something you can succeed in a lot of things, it just takes determination. That’s how he learned Russian, hea? It took incredible determination. And he pulled himself out of really low class upbringing in Fort Worth, which was hell, so he was a bitter young man because of social injustice, which quite frankly existed in Texas especially. So he was a nothing, who tried to make something out of himself. And he was looking, like many Americans, for notoriety. It was subconsciously, the only avenue to succeed. He would kill himself if he could leave a mark, and he left a terrible mark. So he was a very, very desperate man.

K: You mentioned General Walker when you talked with Oswald?

S: Yes, Professor Kuetemeyer told me you know, to deal with people like this who are disturbed, you have to use empathy, be slightly over zealous yourself to like up with them and that total insanity, towards reality. When I heard how hateful he was towards Kennedy and Cuba, which was kind of irrational, I tried to say “hey, there’s something much more real to be concerned about,” because I don’t know about Castro, but I know about this Walker, he’s kind of a Nazi, yea? Not so bad as those Nazis in Germany, but I had specifically mentioned to Lee Harvey Oswald, that Walker had given a speech to the students at the Mississippi campus and those guys went off and killed a couple of journalists.

K: Yes, reporters died during those racial riots.

S: Absolutely, and here's something that we have to protest, and think about it. But I said it has to be all constructive, yes? There was a racial problem and you have to bring justice to the minorities.

K: So do you think your conversation with Oswald about Walker may have instigated him to take a pot shot at him?

S: Yes, he did, and naturally it was a terrible responsibility, and for years when I drove past the underpass I literally had to cry because, you know. But I exonerate myself completely because I had the best intent, embarrassed Kennedy, and I certainly didn’t tell him to take a pot shot at him.

K: I didn’t think you told him to do it, just because you were talking to him about it...

S: I may have triggered it. Actually, a few days after I talked with him, he bought his weapons.

K: It’s a shame that it’s been 30 years and we are just beginning to look at the files.

S: One thing is that the DeMohrenschildts were terribly afraid of all kinds of things, people disappearing and what not, and were afraid to talk about it. They also said that Oswald didn’t do it, but I think it could have been that they had the key in their hand. When they saw this nut giving them a picture with, “the Nazi killer.” It was totally irresponsible for George DeMohrenschildt not to make a noise about it. He told me about it.

K: He knew that Oswald had the rifle.

S: Yes.

K: Now DeMohrenschildt had a shady background himself. And by shady I mean he had these affiliations with intelligence agencies, which leaves open the possibility that the assassination was a covert operation disguised as a patsy as the lone nut. Do you think that is possible?

S: No. He (DeMohrenschildt) was a bit of a nut, but he was also a very spread out person. He was totally irresponsible, the playboy, being the old man, but he was loyal in certain ways to his family and friends, and I don’t think George used this to make money, but he was an opportunist to the first degree, but he had some ideals, like Hemingway.

K: He was a debonair kind of guy.

S: He was too disorganized to be a truly efficient conspirator. He was a good operator.

K: You knew him up until he died?

S: Up until hid death, and I could have probably avoided his suicide because he wrote me a very moving, desperate letter to me, asking if he could come and stay with us in my basement. A desperate letter. And I probably would have let him come, but his wife Jean and her dogs, she would have been a vexation to my wife.

K: That’s a shame, because I read his manuscript, “I’m a Patsy,” and I learned that Jean just died recently.

S: I lost touch. She became a vexation to me. I visited her, and she became more and more irrational. And she used the daughter of a Mexican friend, a common friend of my family and really disturbed her life.

K: Do you know what became of the slide show of their walking trip through Mexico and Guatemala?

S: I don’t know what happened to that.

K: Did you see that?

S: Yes.

K: What was your impression of that?

S: Well it was truly an adventure when he and Jean got together and traveled through the back country there. It was an adventure trip.

K: Yes, I was interested in it and was disappointed that it wasn’t among the official records.

S: He wrote a whole story about it. I read a manuscript on it. Do you have that manuscript?

K: No, but I was trying to locate it.

S: It was interesting. They ran into bandits, and so forth, and visited Mexican friends. The guy had spirit and guts, very smart, spoke many languages. He was a fellow, despite all of his flaws, which I saw, I was really a loyal friend to him. And he knew that I am a solid Christian in my actions, and he respected my honesty and I respected him, despite all his flaws, for whatever good was in his personality. It shows a lot. There was also a lot of irresponsibility in him.

K: What about Michael Paine, did you know him?

S: I did not know them very much, but they were a wonderful family that I knew through the circle of young professionals at the Magnolia labs.

K: Magnolia was at one time owned by a man named Little, did you know him?

S: That must be before me. When I came in it was solidly in Mobil Oil’s hands.

K: I think he must have been in the 50s.

S: I came in 1961.

K: Then you moved to Canada.

S: I moved to Canada in 1968, but I still worked for Magnolia and Mobil Oil until 1976, so I was very often down in Dallas.

K: When you organized the party for the Paines to meet the Oswalds, you were on a business trip?

S: A whole bunch of people came there, but I was on a trip to Libya and overseas. But I put some money down and arranged it, and did my best.

K: You were trying to help Oswald out.

S: Absolutely, especially Marina. That was the other thing. I saw Marina and the little child and Oswald just didn’t take any notice of them, and I thought, “boy, are you in trouble.”

K: What about Glover?

S: Glover, he got married, his second marriage, maybe he’s divorced by now.

K: Is that a German or Russian girl?

S: Hungarian girl, who I met, but she wasn’t my girl friend, but I met her, and maybe I even introduced her to him. Anyway, we were room mates - Pierce, myself and Glover. And Norman Fredrickson, it’s all romantically involved, he married my sweetheart from Germany, but because my sweetheart had left me.

K: Where are they now?

S: He was with the U.S. Geological Survey, but when we last met he didn’t mention her, and I talked all about my marriage and daughters and all.

K: And Pierce was murdered?

S: By a Negro fellow who just wanted to get money from him.

K: A robbery, hea?

S: It was a robbery.

K: Well Betty McDonald Miller had some nice things to say about you.

S: I’m glad. Actually I was down there when PBS invited me and I walked memory lane there.

K: Thank you for talking to me. Do you mind if I call you back if I have any more questions?

S: No, I don’t mind. You see the one thing I can do, is you have to be very honest and upright and open to anybody. I’m not scared of conspiracy. If anybody wants to go after me, fine.

K: Well my goal, as a journalist, the only thing I am after is the complete truth.

S: That’s what I do to, because I see how easily people misinterpret things, including Epstein, who misinterpreted a number of things.

K: I was disappointed when I talked with Betty McDonald when she said she never talked to Epstein, but was interviewed by his secretary. I do all my own interviews, and try to talk to as many people as possible. And thank you for talking with me.

S: Well good luck, it is an important endeavor.

xxxyyyzzzz

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'William Kelly' date='Jan 12 2006, 05:42 AM' post='51070']

Telephone Interview with Volkmar Schmidt. January, 1995. William E. Kelly

Interesting post William but what is or was your personal impression during or after the interview? As far as it is understand, Schmidt has/had no doubt that Oswald was capable of comitting such a crime after only two hours talking to him, quite a rushed judgement but at least he still sticks to his story.

Volkmar Schmidt came from Munich, Germany, to work full time for General Walker. How long

did he work, and where was he on November 23, 1963 when Walker made the call to the same city the CUSA imports came from?

(Mae Brussell)

His loality did not seem to have lasted very long?

In early February 1963, George De Mohrenschildt introduced Oswald to a

German friend named Volkmar Schmidt at a party. Schmidt and Oswald talked

for several hours. Schmidt was initially impressed with Oswald's

intelligence and grasp of international politics, but when the

conversation turned to Cuba -- and Oswald began violently denouncing US

policy towards Castro, Schmidt tried to change the subject. He decided to

try to mollify Oswald by "one-upping" him on his extremism, and brought

up the subject of Major General Edwin A. Walker. He suggested that

Walker's actions at the University of Mississippi had been responsible

for the rioting and bloodshed there. He compared the General to Hitler,

and said that Walker should be treated as a murderer at large.

BTW did you talk with him about his brother Larry?

George

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'William Kelly' date='Jan 12 2006, 05:42 AM' post='51070']

Telephone Interview with Volkmar Schmidt. January, 1995. William E. Kelly

Interesting post William but what is or was your personal impression during or after the interview?

HELLO GEORGE,

I THOUGHT VOLKIE WAS HONEST AND FORTHRIGHT ABOUT WHAT HE KNOWS AND HE KNOWS MORE THAN MOST.

As far as it is understand, Schmidt has/had no doubt that Oswald was capable of comitting such a crime after only two hours talking to him, quite a rushed judgement but at least he still sticks to his story.

His loality did not seem to have lasted very long?

AND HE'S THE ONE WHO SUGGESTS TO OSWALD THAT IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR WALKER TO BE ASSASSINATED, LIKE HITLER SHOULD HAVE BEEN.

HE SAYS HE FEELS GUILTY EVERY TIME HE RIDES THROUGH DEALEY PLAZA.

I DID NOT MENTION LARRY SCHMIDT - WHAT YOU HAVE IS A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF MY CONVERSATION. THOUGH HE IS OPEN TO MORE QUESTIONS, LIKE MS. MCDONALD, I'D RATHER WAIT TILL THEY ARE UNDER OATH.

I WAS MORE INTERESTED IN HIS ROLE IN INTRODUCING THE OSWALDS TO THE PAINES, AND HIS WORK AT MAGNOLIA OIL, WHERE MCDONALD AND SCHMIDT'S ROOMATES ALSO WORKED.

MOB GUY JIM BRADEN, WHO WAS TAKEN INTO CUSTODY AT DEALEY PLAZA, WAS ALSO AFFILIATED WITH MAGNOLIA OIL, AS HE LIVED AT THE TURTLE CREEK HOME - NEAR WALKER - OF MRS. D. A. LITTLE, WIDOW OF THE PRESIDENT OF MAGNOLIA OIL.

In early February 1963, George De Mohrenschildt introduced Oswald to a

German friend named Volkmar Schmidt at a party. Schmidt and Oswald talked

for several hours. Schmidt was initially impressed with Oswald's

intelligence and grasp of international politics, but when the

conversation turned to Cuba -- and Oswald began violently denouncing US

policy towards Castro, Schmidt tried to change the subject. He decided to

try to mollify Oswald by "one-upping" him on his extremism, and brought

up the subject of Major General Edwin A. Walker. He suggested that

Walker's actions at the University of Mississippi had been responsible

for the rioting and bloodshed there. He compared the General to Hitler,....

George

SO OSWALD MEETS VOLKMAR SCHMIDT THROUGH DEMOHRENSCHILDT, AND MAKES THE WALKER CONNECTION, THEN SCHMIDT SETS UP A PARTY FOR THE EXPRESSED PURPOSE OF OSWALD MEETING MICHAEL PAINE, BUT SCHMIDTS IN LIBYA AT THE TIME.

HOW OSWALD MET THE PAINES, HOW HE GOT THE JOB AT THE TSBD, HOW THE OSWALDS ARE MOVED AROUND FROM DALLAS TO NEW ORLEANS AND BACK AGAIN IS MADE TO SEEM SO HAPHAZARD AND COINCEDENTIAL BUT IS ACTUALLY VERY WELL PRECONCEIVED.

SORRY I MISSED THE LARRY SCHMIDT CONNECTION.

BILL KELLY

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I would really like Dick Russell to comment on this post because he has written more about the Walker shooting, Larrie and Volkmar Schmidt and Oswald than perhaps anyone.

Oh for investigators

Name

Larrie Schmidt

Address 1963

4015 Sampson

Phone

214/TA7-0759

Name

Volkmar Schmidt

Address 1963

4449 Potomac

Phone

214/LA8-3901

Note: Information obtained through Dallas Public Library Microfiche of 1963 Dallas Residential Phone Directory on 01/13/06.

Edited by Robert Howard
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  • 3 years later...
I would really like Dick Russell to comment on this post because he has written more about the Walker shooting, Larrie and Volkmar Schmidt and Oswald than perhaps anyone.

Oh for investigators

Name

Larrie Schmidt

Address 1963

4015 Sampson

Phone

214/TA7-0759

Name

Volkmar Schmidt

Address 1963

4449 Potomac

Phone

214/LA8-3901

Note: Information obtained through Dallas Public Library Microfiche of 1963 Dallas Residential Phone Directory on 01/13/06.

Bump. As Sir Thomas would say.

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  • 3 weeks later...
I would really like Dick Russell to comment on this post because he has written more about the Walker shooting, Larrie and Volkmar Schmidt and Oswald than perhaps anyone.

Oh for investigators

Name

Larrie Schmidt

Address 1963

4015 Sampson

Phone

214/TA7-0759

Name

Volkmar Schmidt

Address 1963

4449 Potomac

Phone

214/LA8-3901

Note: Information obtained through Dallas Public Library Microfiche of 1963 Dallas Residential Phone Directory on 01/13/06.

Bump. As Sir Thomas would say.

I thought this was interesting

FBI - HSCA Subject File: Volkmar Schmidt

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...o?docSetId=1442

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=2

NAME CHECK REQUEST - FOLKNER SCHMIDT [LHO 201 File Vol 53B]

Schmidt, Folkner

Came to U.S. from Germany- 1961

Citizenship -German

Residence - US Texas

attached memo states

To: Bill B.

You were called by

Art Dooley

Left this message: On 29 Feb., 1964 FBI talked to Volkmar Schmidt, (14, March 1964

DBA 65834 in Art’s office today)

about G.D.M. Although your trace was on Vallker Schmidt [14 Mar 64 DBA 65834] the two last names

are unusual enough that you should still send trace results over there.

Recieved by DEP

Machine Listing. No other identifying info.

Schmidt, Folke (Prof)

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

For more about (Prof) Folke Schmidt see

http://www.cer-leuven.be/cerleuven/Blanpai..._bargaining.htm

The Stockholm Institute for Scandinavian Law was established in 1956. The founder

of the Institute was the late professor Folke Schmidt, a revered scholar at the

Stockholm University.

http://www.cenneth.com/sisl/tom.php?choice...ge=purpose.html

Not exactly dull and ordinary information, although I have no idea if the two are related..

Edited by Robert Howard
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In early February 1963, George De Mohrenschildt introduced Oswald to a German friend named Volkmar Schmidt at a party.

Schmidt and Oswald talked for several hours.

Schmidt was (initially-oxymoronic?) impressed with Oswald's intelligence and grasp of international politics,

>but<

when the conversation turned to Cuba -- and Oswald began violently denouncing US policy towards Castro,

Schmidt tried to change the subject.

He decided to try to mollify Oswald

by "one-upping" him

on his extremism, and "brought up the subject of Major General Edwin A. Walker. He suggested that Walker's actions at the University of Mississippi had been responsible for the rioting and bloodshed there. He compared the General to Hitler, and said that Walker should be treated as a murderer at large."

. Now this happens to be true, but the JBC and the MSC continued to distribute and promote their film, that protrayed events in a very false manner. They did not admit it and withdraw it until 1665." Kennedy had to fight this battle against segregation. So Volkmar knew the truth. Like wise Oswald was quite correct and correctly indignant about the US treatment of Cuba. So how does one truth become an upmanship in relation to another truth. What was he trying to mollify Oswald about. I don't understand it. Does he explain what he means? What do people think/thought he meant by this. Somehow context comes to mind, is it relevant?

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Guest Tom Scully

John,

You're not from around here....are you? Even in the midst of fighting a world war on two fronts, ignorance and

prejudice fueled aggression prevailed on the homefront, despite the indoctrination of the participants of the belief in the vital interest to the defense of the nation, their own war production work involved. They still stopped production to act on their prejudices in the interest of maintaining the status quo as they perceived and expected it to be:

(Do you really think things had improved all that much by 1963, or just below the veneer, even today?)

http://townhall.com/blog/g/3fbe81f8-ac21-4...s=true#comments

Townhall.com The Blogspot for Political, Conservative and Republican Blogs and Bloggers

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

AG Holder: America a "Nation of Cowards"

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2006-0...g-lawsuit_x.htm

Voting Rights Act pointed in a new direction

Updated 4/3/2006

....The Justice Department has launched a landmark lawsuit against Brown — the first time the federal government has used the 1965 Voting Rights Act to allege racial discrimination against whites....

'Extremely remarkable'

Some legal analysts say the suit marks a striking change of focus by the Bush administration on voting rights cases, which until now have centered on discrimination against blacks and other minorities.....

Precedent potential

Mulroy, the law professor, says the Brown case would result in a significant legal precedent, given that it marks a novel use of the Voting Rights Act......

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/...,791321,00.html

Bad Neighbors

Monday, Feb. 07, 1944

...."No Mexicans" signs can be found in other border states. But big, bumptious Texas is the most assertive in maintaining the doctrine that anyone with a dark skin, however cultivated, industrious and well-behaved, is forever inferior to any light-skinned person. (Mexicans have practically no Negro blood; most of them are part or full-blooded Indians.) There are about a million people of Mexican extraction in Texas. In much of the State they are forced to ride in Jim Crow cars, use Jim Crow toilets, go to separate "Spik" schools and restaurants. Even Mexican consuls have been treated as if they were unfit to associate with any white Texan....

http://news.google.com/archivesearch?as_us...amp;btnG=Search

… OWI Taxes Alabama Shipbuilding Officers With Suppressing...

- New York Times - Jun 13, 1943

... overdue blast in the direction of the Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company. ... On May 25, there was bloody rioting. Eighty Workers Injttred Eighty ...

All 2 related - Related web pages

5,000 SHIPYARD WORKERS IDLE AFTER RACE RIOT

Pay-Per-View - Chicago Tribune - ProQuest Archiver - May 26, 1943

5000 SHIPYARD WORKERS IDLE AFTER RACE RIOT. Negro Welder Assignment ... Twelve thousand Negro construc- tion workers were made idle by the disturbance, ...

Martial Law Invoked as Race Riots Rage in Texas City

Pay-Per-View - Los Angeles Times - ProQuest Archiver - Jun 17, 1943

... or partially destroyed tonight as a result of 24 hours of race riots. ... was Imposed at 8:30 pim. and all persons except war plant workers going to o

0RDERS PUBLISHER JAILED FOR 6 HOURS; Mobile Judge Fines RB Chandler...

$3.95 - New York Times - Jun 12, 1943

... have accused the defendant of inciting to riot, instead of the less serious charge. ... Negro workers were driven from the yard, and Federal troops were ...

http://www.pegasusnews.com/news/2007/aug/0...gainst-gay-men/

Friday, August 3, 2007

DPD vice unit wages 50-year war against gay men

By David Webb of Dallas Voice

.......In a May 29, 1969, story, the newspaper reported that Alvin Leon Buchanan, a Dallas man who had been arrested twice on sodomy charges, filed a lawsuit against the Dallas police vice squad, claiming it had violated his rights under the 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 9th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.

Buchanan was sentenced in 1969 to two five-year concurrent jail terms for his offenses, which occurred in the restrooms of a Dallas park and a retail store.

Buchanan’s lawyer, Henry J. McCluskey Jr., contended in the federal lawsuit that the state law declaring homosexual acts unlawful was unconstitutional. It noted that undercover police officers had hid in the attics, ventilator shafts and woodwork of restrooms in Lee Park, Turtle Creek Park and the Sears Roebuck store on Ross Avenue to make arrests.

A married couple, Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Gibson, joined the lawsuit against the sodomy law, claiming they feared the city’s war on sodomy could be extended to straight couples engaged in private acts.

At first Wade claimed the law had never been used in Dallas to prosecute a married couple, but his office later acknowledged that it had once.

A three-judge federal panel seated by Judges Irving Goldberg, Sarah T. Hughes and William M. Taylor Jr., all of Dallas, struck down the state’s sodomy law in 1970 — which also prohibited sodomy between a man and his wife — saying the state had “no right to dictate the private sex practices of consenting adults,” including homosexuals.

But State District Judge Ed Gossett, in whose court Buchanan was convicted, refused to free Buchanan from prison, referring to him as a “confessed and convicted homosexual.” He condemned the federal panel as liberal judges and accused them of “aiding and abetting” a crime wave.

The federal panel refused to reconsider its decision and Wade appealed directly to the U.S. Supreme Court, writing in his appeal, “Throughout history society has considered sodomy with distaste and revulsion and has passed statutes which outlaw its commission.”

Wade added that sodomy in marriage leads to “revulsion and divorce” and warned that legalizing sodomy would “open Pandora’s box.” He predicted the legalization of sodomy in private settings would set the stage for illegal drug use and even violent crimes to be sanctioned in private relationships.

In the meantime, the Dallas City Council passed an ordinance prohibiting sodomy in public places.

In March 1971, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Texas sodomy law and ordered the lower courts to reconsider rulings striking it down, and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the sodomy law.

The police department resumed sodomy arrests after the ruling, and Wade soon announced he would renew prosecutions of sodomy.

In 1973 the Texas Legislature rewrote the state’s sodomy law to exclude straight people, renaming it the “homosexual conduct” law. It called for a $500 fine and a maximum of one-year imprisonment.

It would take two more lawsuits and 30 years before the sodomy law was finally struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court. Sexual relations between consenting same-sex adults in private became legal in 2003, but sexual activity in public places of any kind remains illegal and a pitfall that can quickly ruin a life. An arrest could mean the loss of a job, reputation or even more.

Anyone who engages in sex in a public place runs the danger of being arrested, tried, and having their name and picture published on the Dallas Police Department’s Web site and in the local media.

A lot has changed in Dallas during the past 50 years. Wade left office and died in 2001, but the vice squad has lived on. It may function a little differently today, but the vice squad’s agenda is much the same as it was 50 years ago.

And with Dallas police recruiting gay and lesbian officers today, it could be a gay vice squad officer making the arrests — if that wasn’t the case already before.

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I would really like Dick Russell to comment on this post because he has written more about the Walker shooting, Larrie and Volkmar Schmidt and Oswald than perhaps anyone.

Robert, I don't think Larrie and Volkmar Schmidt were related at all. Unless there is some informaiton I missed that indicates that. - BK

Oh for investigators

Name

Larrie Schmidt

Address 1963

4015 Sampson

Phone

214/TA7-0759

Name

Volkmar Schmidt

Address 1963

4449 Potomac

Phone

214/LA8-3901

Note: Information obtained through Dallas Public Library Microfiche of 1963 Dallas Residential Phone Directory on 01/13/06.

Bump. As Sir Thomas would say.

I thought this was interesting

FBI - HSCA Subject File: Volkmar Schmidt

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...o?docSetId=1442

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=2

NAME CHECK REQUEST - FOLKNER SCHMIDT [LHO 201 File Vol 53B]

Schmidt, Folkner

Came to U.S. from Germany- 1961

Citizenship -German

Residence - US Texas

attached memo states

To: Bill B.

You were called by

Art Dooley

Left this message: On 29 Feb., 1964 FBI talked to Volkmar Schmidt, (14, March 1964

DBA 65834 in Art's office today)

about G.D.M. Although your trace was on Vallker Schmidt [14 Mar 64 DBA 65834] the two last names

are unusual enough that you should still send trace results over there.

Recieved by DEP

Machine Listing. No other identifying info.

Schmidt, Folke (Prof)

http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/...amp;relPageId=1

For more about (Prof) Folke Schmidt see

http://www.cer-leuven.be/cerleuven/Blanpai..._bargaining.htm

The Stockholm Institute for Scandinavian Law was established in 1956. The founder

of the Institute was the late professor Folke Schmidt, a revered scholar at the

Stockholm University.

http://www.cenneth.com/sisl/tom.php?choice...ge=purpose.html

Not exactly dull and ordinary information, although I have no idea if the two are related..

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In early February 1963, George De Mohrenschildt introduced Oswald to a German friend named Volkmar Schmidt at a party.

Schmidt and Oswald talked for several hours.

Schmidt was (initially-oxymoronic?) impressed with Oswald's intelligence and grasp of international politics,

>but<

when the conversation turned to Cuba -- and Oswald began violently denouncing US policy towards Castro,

Schmidt tried to change the subject.

He decided to try to mollify Oswald

by "one-upping" him

on his extremism, and "brought up the subject of Major General Edwin A. Walker. He suggested that Walker's actions at the University of Mississippi had been responsible for the rioting and bloodshed there. He compared the General to Hitler, and said that Walker should be treated as a murderer at large."

. Now this happens to be true, but the JBC and the MSC continued to distribute and promote their film, that protrayed events in a very false manner. They did not admit it and withdraw it until 1665." Kennedy had to fight this battle against segregation. So Volkmar knew the truth. Like wise Oswald was quite correct and correctly indignant about the US treatment of Cuba. So how does one truth become an upmanship in relation to another truth. What was he trying to mollify Oswald about. I don't understand it. Does he explain what he means? What do people think/thought he meant by this. Somehow context comes to mind, is it relevant?

"...He compared the General to Hitler, and said that Walker should be treated as a murderer at large."

Robin Winks, In Cloak and Gown:

"...Coon, then professor of anthropology from Harvard, took a tough view of war: if policy required that someone be assassinated, he favored it, and at the end of the war he wrote to Donovan that "some power, some third class of individuals aside from the leaders and the scholars must exist, and this third class must have the task of thwarting mistakes" – that is, must identify the potential danger of a Hitler and his immediate disciples early and kill them...."

Also consider, at the same time that Volkmar Schmidt was talking to Oswald about killing Walker, and making the analogy to the Valklyrie plot to kill Hitler, Desmond FitzGerald and the CIA/DOD Task Force responsible for the contingency plans for a coup in Cuba, were studying the Valkyrie plot to use against Castro.

Were any of these things connected, or were they just random events?

BK

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Thank you, Bill, for these interesting Valkyrie contributions.

Thank you for keeping up with this line of inquiry David, as we're just getting started.

You know when Sen. Richard Schweiker said that there's "fingerprints of intelligencen" all over the JFK assassination? Well I think this is an intelligence fingerprint, as every covert operation is different, yet they maintain the signature of the mastermind.

While Volkmar Schmidt first tipped me off about it, I think herr Gisivious is an important player. If FitzGerald's CIA/DOD Task Force on Contingencies for a coup in Cuba were studying the Vakyrie plot to adapt to use against Castro, then they must have read Gisivious' book about the plot, which was published in 1948 with a forward by Allen Dulles.

Then after Nurenberg, Gisivious comes to USA and Dulles sets him up at the home of Tom Braden. Were they studying the Valkyrie plot at this time, and did they tap Gisivious personally?

Then Gisivious moves to Dallas to work for Dresser Industries, as we learn more,....

BK

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Then after Nurenberg, Gisivious comes to USA and Dulles sets him up at the home of Tom Braden. Were they studying the Valkyrie plot at this time, and did they tap Gisivious personally?

Then Gisivious moves to Dallas to work for Dresser Industries, as we learn more,....

BK

Bill, I find it interesting that Gisivious worked for Dresser Ind. Here's some rather interesting info on Dresser. Harriman & Co purchased Dresser in 1929, Prescott Bush was a director and they all became extremely rich by re-arming Germany. Later with others, notably John Foster Dulles, brother of Allen Dulles, they actually financed Hitler. P. Bush's son, G.H.W. Bush, also worked for Dresser before forming his own company Zapata Oil and of course later became director of the C.I.A. in 1976.

Dresser eventually went on to merge with Halliburton.

I've deliberately tried not to go into too much detail as I dont want to deviate from your thread too much, but I just find it incredible that no matter which avenue of research we take we always seem to bump into the arms industry, oil magnates, CIA and the Bush family. Coincidence?

Edited by Denis Pointing
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Then after Nurenberg, Gisivious comes to USA and Dulles sets him up at the home of Tom Braden. Were they studying the Valkyrie plot at this time, and did they tap Gisivious personally?

Then Gisivious moves to Dallas to work for Dresser Industries, as we learn more,....

BK

Bill, I find it interesting that Gisivious worked for Dresser Ind. Here's some rather interesting info on Dresser. Harriman & Co purchased Dresser in 1929, Prescott Bush was a director and they all became extremely rich by re-arming Germany. Later with others, notably John Foster Dulles, brother of Allen Dulles, they actually financed Hitler. P. Bush's son, G.H.W. Bush, also worked for Dresser before forming his own company Zapata Oil and of course later became director of the C.I.A. in 1976.

Dresser eventually went on to merge with Halliburton.

I've deliberately tried not to go into too much detail as I dont want to deviate from your thread too much, but I just find it incredible that no matter which avenue of research we take we always seem to bump into the arms industry, oil magnates, CIA and the Bush family. Coincidence?

Hi Denis,

Yes, thanks for the deep background on Dresser. I hadn't gone there yet, but I knew it was a bees nest of scroudrels.

I'd like to know when Gisivious began working for them and moved to Dallas and what he did there.

BK

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I'd like to know when Gisivious began working for them and moved to Dallas and what he did there.

BK

Dresser relocated to Dallas in 1950, Neil Mallon was made president and it was he who employed Gisevius in the same year. Gisevius was officially hired to work on a economic development program called "INSITUTE ON TECHNICAL COOPERATION" whatever that means, part of his "real" job seems to have been acting as liaison between Mallon and Dulles.

Interesting side note, Magnolia Oil also moved to Dallas at the same time as Dresser. The more I find out about Gisevios the more I realise that although he may have been anti Nazi and certainly anti Hitler he was not necessarily anti fascist, nor of course was Dulles.

Edited by Denis Pointing
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