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Skull Curvatures


John Dolva
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In the ongoing process of trying to understand the autopsy photos.

An attempt to construct a virtual 3d model

Understanding curvatures.

Looking at MRI slices and the curvatures indicated at the rear of the headwound photo.

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While stacking MRI scan slices and deleting the brain to build a texture and depth map of the inside of a skull, I notice that the top 'corners' of the back of the skull are not as round as thought but bevelled. And that this bevelled edge appears replicated in the head wound photo.

Edited by John Dolva
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a recap:

referring to 'autopsy table'

The genesis of the thinking in 'autopsy table' was an observation by Lee that a feature of the headwound photo was a join on the edge of the autopsy table. At the time I rejected this idea and sought to show that the feature was the hole that the head stirrup was put into.

My attention was brought to the construction of the autopsy table and I remembered having seen something about it on Alans site. Looking at this I came to understand that what Lee was suggesting was not only possible, but likely.

I became aware that there must be areas missing from the headwound photo and started to agitate for them. After some time I came across some of this and was able to identify a drainage hole.

Frank at this point contributed a detailed study on the behaviour of a hole viewed from different angles and distances.

Robin brought to light a number of standard items belonging to the toolkit of an autopsy room which helped to provide a number of possibilities for peripheral items.

As a result of focusing solely on the features that are not disputed, drainage hole, Franks analysis of light and the ruler markings, the headwound photo was able to be oriented properly as the photographer saw it.

A suggestion from Frank led to an understanding of the behaviour of sizes of items on a closeup photo. Close items will tend to look unnaturally large in relation to further away ones.

____________

Having reached a point that I felt confident to suggest seriously, with the ability to explain any objections (IMO), that this orientation of the photo is indeed correct.

____________

At this point I decide to tackle the head itself.

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

The tilt and rotation of the head has to make sense as far as the visible features and features that can be extrapolated.

I acceptn that the wound was basically on the right hemisphere.

The understanding gained from the exoeriments with cd's looked at closeup gives an understanding that the size of the far off features does not determine the size of the near features in a way that immediately makes sense. With a proper understanding this can be dealt with.

So the head is basically two photos. A closeup of the near features and a more 'normal' photo of the far features.

A determination using the features of the far features must match a scaled extrapolation to the near features and vice versa.

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

So, to separate the near and far one can see in close scrutiny that there is a difference in sharpness or focus. The near features are more blurred. (Again, input by Frank was a genesis in this understanding)

Thus one can discern a dividing line that doesn't exactly match the first glance. There are two short segments where one must interpolate. How significant this is I can't say at this time.

Thus one can isolate the far features and derive a series of curvature as described above.

Edited by John Dolva
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update.

interior rear texture and depth map as bitmaps

use in Image Analyzer. I find scale 1, no reflection and gouraud good. play around with it to get different views to check curvatures with.

The sutures and internal shapes are well visible.

The fringe serves as indicator of the depth and outline projected to rear plane.

The rear view is still just a view of the internal structure but viewed from the outside.

The outside view of the skull itself I'll post as it's done.

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Guest Stephen Turner

John, good work. Although my knowledge of the subject at hand is insuficent to allow me to make comments/sugestions, rest assured, your detailed analysis here is being followed with much interest..Steve.

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John,

Excellent, as usual!

I have obtained access to some items (which I will photograph) that may help demonstrate how these curved objects project onto a 2D surface. I'll post them to my photobucket page as soon as my schedule permits (work has been consuming far too much of my 'free time' recently).

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Thank you. Glad you guys are folowing/contributing. Trying to go step by careful step so as to avoid future back track as much as possible.

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Looking at just the lowest parts in the middle of the photo.

Lines, areas and shadows marked, enhanced.

What I see is an object has slid along the inside of the skull(diagonally from top right to centre), pierced the inner lining and broken it and 'dropped' into a depression and stopped under a flap?

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The inside of the base of the skull

texture

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...nnerbasetex.jpg

depthmap

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yanndee/innerbase.jpg

when snapshotting an orientation one likes to look at, a depth map of this orientation is also made.

This depth map can then be used on photos to get different views of various photos.

The easiest way to transfer this depth map to an image program is to save it as a png and then opening in other program to align and produce a texture to take back to IA for analysis, using the zbuffer already there.

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Thank you Adam, good to hear.

some more models (bmp textures and depth maps)

the top of the skull, both inside and outside showing features such as shape and sutures.

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...poutsidetex.jpg

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yanndee/topdepth.jpg

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...opinsidetex.jpg

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...insidedepth.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

"The outside view of the skull itself I'll post as it's done."

Outside of the skull rear texture

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...sidetexrear.jpg

Outside of the skull rear depth map

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yan...dereardepth.jpg

examples showing sutures and contours and external occipital protuberance

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Looking at just the lowest parts in the middle of the photo.

Lines, areas and shadows marked, enhanced.

What I see is an object has slid along the inside of the skull(diagonally from top right to centre), pierced the inner lining and broken it and 'dropped' into a depression and stopped under a flap?

In the chapter "Solving The Great Head Wound Mystery" of my presentation, I discuss this close up shot and match the inner contours to the inner contours of the posterior cranial fossa. The hole surrounded by the veiny material matches precisely with the location of the jugular foramen in the base of the skull, the opening through which the jugular vein enters the cranium. The current crop of lone-nutters over on alt.assassination.jfk insist that instead this hole is the entrance hole on the back of Kennedy's skull viewed from the inside. They fail to see that there is more than one hole, and fail to acknowledge that the veiny material surrounding the hole exceeds the amount of material it would take to cover the hole. Dr. Chad Zimmerman insists he saw the autopsy table through this hole in the photo at the archives; Larry Sturdivan said, however, that it was a blue towel. I believe they both are fooling themselves.

Edited by Pat Speer
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This isn't a detailed response to the above.

Here is a suggestion where one is looking at on the rear of the skull as the posterior cranial fossa. The link is to a full size version for scrutiny.

The dissected skull shows the brain removed carefully enough to preserve much of the dural. Fragments of this is visible on the headwound photo.

The 3d models were used to recreate. On the 3d models the dural is not included, but it shows the undamaged inner lining.

So one is basically looking almost straight down on the skull, similarly tp the larger of the autopsy photos.

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c168/yanndee/be701.jpg

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