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JFK Assassination Anthology II


William Kelly
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Dick Russell, JFK and the Cuban Connection (March, 1996):

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/jfkcuban.htm

Although High Times is a fine periodical that has been around for many years, they seem to know so much about drug operations at all levels in South and Latin America, I often wondered if they did not have connections to U.S. Intelligence at some level.

Having said that, it is somehow a fitting testament to the state of affairs of JFK assassination research in 1996 that such important information from such an important author could not find an audience in Newsweek or Time, nor even Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone or The Wall Street Journal.

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Other articles by Dick Russell that are worth reading include:

Little Havana's Reign of Terror (October, 1976)

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/havana.htm

Richard Case Nagell, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1992)

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/richard.htm

Confessions of Conspiracy Theorist (February, 1993)

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/confessions.htm

Testimony of Dick Russell (March, 1995)

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/arrb.htm

Oswald and the CIA (August, 1996)

http://www.dickrussell.org/articles/oswaldcia.htm

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Thanks everybody for suggestions, and will add all to list - and known links, especially Phil Melanson, God bless him.

Many thanks for posting the links, John.

I also came up with two more on my own - "I'm Glad the CIA is Imoral" - May 20, 1967 Saturday Evening Post by Tom Braden, and Dwight McDonald's 1965 Esquire article that inspired Garrison.

Now who would publish such a conglamoration?

BK

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Thanks everybody for suggestions, and will add all to list - and known links, especially Phil Melanson, God bless him.

Many thanks for posting the links, John.

I also came up with two more on my own - "I'm Glad the CIA is Imoral" - May 20, 1967 Saturday Evening Post by Tom Braden, and Dwight McDonald's 1965 Esquire article that inspired Garrison.

You can find Tom Braden article here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKbraden.htm

Braden deputy at the International Organizations Division (IOD) was our old friend Cord Meyer. Braden's article is a good defence of CIA spending. What he did not say was that some of this money was used to turn left-wing politicians and trade union leaders in Europe to the right. One of Braden's great successes was in the UK.

Braden made a further confession in a Granada Television program, World in Action: The Rise and Fall of the CIA (June, 1975):

It never had to account for the money it spent except to the President if the President wanted to know how much money it was spending. But otherwise the funds were not only unaccountable, they were unvouchered, so there was really no means of checking them - "unvouchered funds" meaning expenditures that don't have to be accounted for.... If the director of CIA wanted to extend a present, say, to someone in Europe - a Labour leader - suppose he just thought, This man can use fifty thousand dollars, he's working well and doing a good job - he could hand it to him and never have to account to anybody... I don't mean to imply that there were a great many of them that were handed out as Christmas presents. They were handed out for work well performed or in order to perform work well.... Politicians in Europe, particularly right after the war, got a lot of money from the CIA....

Since it was unaccountable, it could hire as many people as it wanted. It never had to say to any committee - no committee said to it - "You can only have so many men." It could do exactly as it pleased. It made preparations therefore for every contingency. It could hire armies; it could buy banks. There was simply no limit to the money it could spend and no limit to the people it could hire and no limit to the activities it could decide were necessary to conduct the war - the secret war.... It was a multinational. Maybe it was one of the first.

Journalists were a target, labor unions a particular target - that was one of the activities in which the communists spent the most money. They set up a successful communist labor union in France right after the war. We countered it with Force Ouvriere. They set up this very successful communist labor union in Italy, and we countered it with another union.... We had a vast project targeted on the intellectuals - "the battle for Picasso's mind," if you will. The communists set up fronts which they effectively enticed a great many particularly the French intellectuals to join. We tried to set up a counterfront. (This was done through funding of social and cultural organizations such as the Pan-American Foundation, the International Marketing Institute, the International Development Foundation, the American Society of African Culture, and the Congress of Cultural Freedom.) I think the budget for the Congress of Cultural Freedom one year that I had charge of it was about $800,000, $900,000, which included, of course, the subsidy for the Congress's magazine, Encounter. That doesn't mean that everybody that worked for Encounter or everybody who wrote for Encounter knew anything about it. Most of the people who worked for Encounter and all but one of the men who ran it had no idea that it was paid for by the CIA.

As Braden admits "journalists were a target". Braden was a key figure in Operation Mockingbird. When Braden retired in 1954 he was replaced as head of IOD by Cord Meyer.

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Thanks everybody for suggestions, and will add all to list - and known links, especially Phil Melanson, God bless him.

Many thanks for posting the links, John.

I also came up with two more on my own - "I'm Glad the CIA is Imoral" - May 20, 1967 Saturday Evening Post by Tom Braden, and Dwight McDonald's 1965 Esquire article that inspired Garrison.

You can find Tom Braden article here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKbraden.htm

Braden deputy at the International Organizations Division (IOD) was our old friend Cord Meyer. Braden's article is a good defence of CIA spending. What he did not say was that some of this money was used to turn left-wing politicians and trade union leaders in Europe to the right. One of Braden's great successes was in the UK.

Braden made a further confession in a Granada Television program, World in Action: The Rise and Fall of the CIA (June, 1975):

It never had to account for the money it spent except to the President if the President wanted to know how much money it was spending. But otherwise the funds were not only unaccountable, they were unvouchered, so there was really no means of checking them - "unvouchered funds" meaning expenditures that don't have to be accounted for.... If the director of CIA wanted to extend a present, say, to someone in Europe - a Labour leader - suppose he just thought, This man can use fifty thousand dollars, he's working well and doing a good job - he could hand it to him and never have to account to anybody... I don't mean to imply that there were a great many of them that were handed out as Christmas presents. They were handed out for work well performed or in order to perform work well.... Politicians in Europe, particularly right after the war, got a lot of money from the CIA....

Since it was unaccountable, it could hire as many people as it wanted. It never had to say to any committee - no committee said to it - "You can only have so many men." It could do exactly as it pleased. It made preparations therefore for every contingency. It could hire armies; it could buy banks. There was simply no limit to the money it could spend and no limit to the people it could hire and no limit to the activities it could decide were necessary to conduct the war - the secret war.... It was a multinational. Maybe it was one of the first.

Journalists were a target, labor unions a particular target - that was one of the activities in which the communists spent the most money. They set up a successful communist labor union in France right after the war. We countered it with Force Ouvriere. They set up this very successful communist labor union in Italy, and we countered it with another union.... We had a vast project targeted on the intellectuals - "the battle for Picasso's mind," if you will. The communists set up fronts which they effectively enticed a great many particularly the French intellectuals to join. We tried to set up a counterfront. (This was done through funding of social and cultural organizations such as the Pan-American Foundation, the International Marketing Institute, the International Development Foundation, the American Society of African Culture, and the Congress of Cultural Freedom.) I think the budget for the Congress of Cultural Freedom one year that I had charge of it was about $800,000, $900,000, which included, of course, the subsidy for the Congress's magazine, Encounter. That doesn't mean that everybody that worked for Encounter or everybody who wrote for Encounter knew anything about it. Most of the people who worked for Encounter and all but one of the men who ran it had no idea that it was paid for by the CIA.

As Braden admits "journalists were a target". Braden was a key figure in Operation Mockingbird. When Braden retired in 1954 he was replaced as head of IOD by Cord Meyer.

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Thanks everybody for suggestions, and will add all to list - and known links, especially Phil Melanson, God bless him.

Many thanks for posting the links, John.

I also came up with two more on my own - "I'm Glad the CIA is Imoral" - May 20, 1967 Saturday Evening Post by Tom Braden, and Dwight McDonald's 1965 Esquire article that inspired Garrison.

You can find Tom Braden article here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKbraden.htm

Braden deputy at the International Organizations Division (IOD) was our old friend Cord Meyer. Braden's article is a good defence of CIA spending. What he did not say was that some of this money was used to turn left-wing politicians and trade union leaders in Europe to the right. One of Braden's great successes was in the UK.

Braden made a further confession in a Granada Television program, World in Action: The Rise and Fall of the CIA (June, 1975):

It never had to account for the money it spent except to the President if the President wanted to know how much money it was spending. But otherwise the funds were not only unaccountable, they were unvouchered, so there was really no means of checking them - "unvouchered funds" meaning expenditures that don't have to be accounted for.... If the director of CIA wanted to extend a present, say, to someone in Europe - a Labour leader - suppose he just thought, This man can use fifty thousand dollars, he's working well and doing a good job - he could hand it to him and never have to account to anybody... I don't mean to imply that there were a great many of them that were handed out as Christmas presents. They were handed out for work well performed or in order to perform work well.... Politicians in Europe, particularly right after the war, got a lot of money from the CIA....

Since it was unaccountable, it could hire as many people as it wanted. It never had to say to any committee - no committee said to it - "You can only have so many men." It could do exactly as it pleased. It made preparations therefore for every contingency. It could hire armies; it could buy banks. There was simply no limit to the money it could spend and no limit to the people it could hire and no limit to the activities it could decide were necessary to conduct the war - the secret war.... It was a multinational. Maybe it was one of the first.

Journalists were a target, labor unions a particular target - that was one of the activities in which the communists spent the most money. They set up a successful communist labor union in France right after the war. We countered it with Force Ouvriere. They set up this very successful communist labor union in Italy, and we countered it with another union.... We had a vast project targeted on the intellectuals - "the battle for Picasso's mind," if you will. The communists set up fronts which they effectively enticed a great many particularly the French intellectuals to join. We tried to set up a counterfront. (This was done through funding of social and cultural organizations such as the Pan-American Foundation, the International Marketing Institute, the International Development Foundation, the American Society of African Culture, and the Congress of Cultural Freedom.) I think the budget for the Congress of Cultural Freedom one year that I had charge of it was about $800,000, $900,000, which included, of course, the subsidy for the Congress's magazine, Encounter. That doesn't mean that everybody that worked for Encounter or everybody who wrote for Encounter knew anything about it. Most of the people who worked for Encounter and all but one of the men who ran it had no idea that it was paid for by the CIA.

As Braden admits "journalists were a target". Braden was a key figure in Operation Mockingbird. When Braden retired in 1954 he was replaced as head of IOD by Cord Meyer.

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The Defector Study: Staff Report of the Select Committee on Assassinations U.S. House of Representatives (March 1979)

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/jfkinfo4/j...tor.htm#SLOBODA

AJ Weberman, CIA Reaction to Oswald’s Defection

http://ajweberman.com/nodules2/nodulec5.htm

Peter R. Whitmey, Did Oswald Come Back?

http://www.jfk-info.com/whitmey8.htm

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  • 5 years later...

.... Good Day .... The ANTHONY SUMMERS 2001-updated, must read, Vanity Fair article, "The Ghosts of November" is archived, and always available, here....

http://web.archive.org/web/20050313172040/members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/GHOSTSofNOVEMBERupdate2001.html

....JEFFERSON MORLEY's outstanding, "Revelation 19.63" is also archived and available here....

http://web.archive.org/web/20050209015743/members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/REVELATION1963.html

....GAETON FONZI's original lengthy manuscript article, "The Last Investigation" (complete with its original spelling errors) that preceded his book of the same title, is also archived and available here....

http://web.archive.org/web/20050209021259/members.aol.com/DRoberdeau/JFK/LASTinvestigation.html

Best Regards in Research,

++Don

Donald Roberdeau

U.S.S. John F. Kennedy, CV-67, plank walker

Sooner, or later, The Truth emerges Clearly

For your considerations....

Homepage : President KENNEDY "Men of Courage" speech, and Assassination Evidence,

Witnesses, Suspects + Outstanding Researchers Discoveries and Considerations....http://droberdeau.bl...ination_09.html

Dealey Plaza Map : Detailing 11-22-63 Victims precise locations, Witnesses, Films & Photos,

Evidence, Suspected bullet trajectories, Important information & Key Considerations, in One Convenient Resource....http://img831.images...dated110110.gif

Visual Report : "The First Bullet Impact Into President Kennedy: while JFK was Still Hidden

Under the 'magic-limbed-ricochet-tree' ".... http://img504.images...k1102308ms8.gif

Visual Report : Reality versus C.A.D. : the Real World, versus, Garbage-In, Garbage-Out....http://img248.images...ealityvscad.gif

Discovery : "Very Close JFK Assassination Witness ROSEMARY WILLIS Zapruder Film

Documented 2nd Headsnap:

West, Ultrafast, and Directly Towards the Grassy Knoll".... http://educationforu...?showtopic=2394

T ogether

E veryone

A chieves

M ore

For the United States:

advisory7regional.gif

http://www.dhs.gov/dhspublic/

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