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Larry Hancock, Someone Would Have Talked (2nd edition)


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Mike, I would say that to a large extent Jim's book along with the movie JFK launched the surge of work in the 90's - leading to the efforts of the ARRB, the

JFK records act and the amazing amount of information we have now that was lacking before.

On the other hand, I've chided Jim in person several times for taking away my last 16 or so years....he shows no sign of guilt that I've seen so far..grin.

I would like to paraphrase another remark by Jim - made in opening a JFK Lancer conference a few years ago. The wording is not his, its my

recollection but I think it is telling.

..........................

....people, we know Lee Oswald did not act alone, we know there was a conspiracy, when are we going to stop arguing over the

details, get past that and move on to what needs to be done next?

..........................

I think it was shortly after that when I stopped obsessing about the Plaza and batting my head against the cover up and started looking for

a flanking maneuver.

-- Larry

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Hi Larry,

I will look that info up thanks. I will see if I can contact Richard through the forum as I sometimes have trouble with the search feature. It sometimes goes to the results page but the results don't load even if I press refresh.

Hopefully Glen will have the time to reply will keep my eye on that thread too.

It does seem quite amazing to me that this very important piece of evidence potentially placing a concrete suspect in the TSBD on the 22nd November has been totally ignored by the authorities for so many years! I'm guessing the mainstream US media have totally ignored the story as well?

Then again I probably shouldn't be surprised.... :rolleyes:

It seems that where Mac Wallace is concerned, a different set of rules apply. I still can't believe he was convicted of murder yet got off with a suspended sentence!

Francesca, there are some great posts on the fingerprint issue in Glen Samples book thread and by Richard Bartholemew (sp...sorry Richard, I know I get that spelling wrong way to frequently) on the forum...you might do a search for his posts.

The issue with the prints is twofold (as I understand it). One is obtaining the originals of the prints which are on the boxes from the snipers nest. The other involves obtaining comparison prints of very good quality for Malcolm Wallace....that's where Houston PD comes into the picture. Again, as I understand it, the master prints used by Nathon Darby were obtained by Jaye Duncanson and are now in possession of Walt Brown, don't know what Walt is doing with the material left to him by Jaye.

Dawn has asked Glen if he is doing something further with the prints...perhaps some more discussion will emerge on that thread. Also, you do need to find and read

Richard B's great paper on the fingerprings, he posted a link to an updated version last year.

-- Larry

Edited by Francesca Akhtar
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  • 3 weeks later...

The current goal is to have the book printed and in circulation by the first week of November. Hopefully it will be worth the wait,

Someone Would Have Talked is a must read for anyone with an interest in the events surrounding the murder of President Kennedy. As members of this Forum might expect, Larry Hancock has done a remarkable job, and his efforts have resulted in a classic examination of events leading up to Kennedy's death and the ensuing coverup.

Building on the research of Russell, Fonzi, Summers, Griggs, and many many others, Larry has masterfully synthesized their research with much of his own. The results are powerful, compelling, and represent a major step forward in our understanding of the assassination.

I've yet to finish my second reading and this is not meant as a review, but just some of my first impressions.

1) As anyone that is familiar with Larry and his research knows, his documentation is immaculate.

2) The summaries at the end of each chapter are most helpful.

3)
Someone Would Have Talked
is remarkably current. It contains much new information.

4) Larry Hancock is a gifted critical thinker. Fortunately, he gives the reader the benefit of his reasoned conclusions.

5) Larry points the way for future researchers. This may be one of the most important facets of the book.

6)
Someone Would Have Talked
will endure as a useful reference tool for many of the perplexing events surrounding JFK's death.

7) Importantly, the book reads well. Starting with John Martino, Larry weaves a fascinating and convincing account of the roles of so many others.

8) Whenever possible, Larry has corroborated his evidence from multiple sources.

9) There is a lot to absorb, yet Larry does an awesome job of tying events together into a story that is not only believable, but compelling.

Larry, congratulations on this edition of Someone Would Have Talked. I think you deserve to be proud of your work. I'm certainly looking forward to discussions on this Forum by the members, once SWHT is released.

Someone Would Have Talked is destined to take its place as a classic work in the research of President Kennedy's murder. In my opinion, it was well worth the wait.

I

I'd only chime in that Michael Hogan's 'review' is on target, Larry's book is all of those nine points listed above, and more. It weaves together in a very clear and convincing way many important [and sometimes new or overlooked] facts, persons and associations, etc. I find myself jumping around in it to pin down all the details on a person or association and am starting a second read-through, following the first - to glean all the details. An amazing amount of information and important associations. A must read for any serious student of the events of Dallas! Great work Larry!......Bravo! Will have some specific questions after second read-through.

I agree.

Larry has done a great job giving detailed background on what I believe to be the operative elements of the conspiracy, putting together important associations of individuals and groups, and framing their related historical context.

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Hi Larry,

in your book you mention that Tony Varona was a language teacher for Berlitz at one point - didn't David Phillips also have something to do with the Berlitz school? I seem to remember reading about it in The Last Investigation. Is this just a coincidence do you think or could there be more to it?

I might add that, during a preliminary briefing session for JFK Lancer's Hemming panel, Gerry identified the so-called Windbreaker Man (Umbrella Man's pally) as a linguist who privately tutored the children of wealthy Cuban exiles and was known as The Professor.

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Francesca, I did a quick scan of The Last Investigation but could not locate anything on the Phillips indexed pages about Berlitz.

Beyond that though, I would think it would be a matter of coincidence; when Phillips needed to have someone on call he had

the resources to get them jobs as he did with Veciana.

As I recall Verona's job with Berlitz came after he had moved to New York and following an earlier job selling used cars; clearly he

was much better suited to the language teaching job.

I think the real question in play is why Verona virtually abandoned the exile movement for a considerable period of time, not only

abondoned it but left Miami where he obviously had a network and a lot of supporters. Not that there was not a very influential

exile community (old school) in New York but Verona doesn't seem to have connected with them....and they were of a like conservative

political orientation and could easily have found him a job in one of their businesses. Seems like there might be an interesting story there.

....and on Charles's mention of "The Professor"...seems to me like I've heard Dennis Harbor called that....but I think we can write him off as being a candidate

for "windbreaker man"...

-- Larry

Hi Larry,

in your book you mention that Tony Varona was a language teacher for Berlitz at one point - didn't David Phillips also have something to do with the Berlitz school? I seem to remember reading about it in The Last Investigation. Is this just a coincidence do you think or could there be more to it?

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Hi Larry,

I just dug out my copy of The Last Investigation and no it isn't mentioned in the index as its only a brief reference. I found it by just going through the bits on DAP. In my copy it's on page 265 in the chapter called 'Signals From The Night Watch.' It says:

'Phillips admitted that after he hung up his shingle as a public relations counselor, "No one rushed the door in any event, not did I solicit clients."

He noted though that he did eventually wind up with at least one client with which he briefly worked a trade for French lessons: the Berlitz language school.'

I found a bit of the quote in 'The Nightwatch' but can't find the bit about the Berlitz language school. Fonzi must have taken that bit from another part of The Nightwatch. I've been going though it but haven't yet come across it .Having read it fresh it seems there is nothing much to it. Just thought it a weird coincidence that Varona as well worked for them, and wondered if any of the other exiles might have.

Although I wonder if this 'client' who gave him French lessons was anyone significant?

I must get around to reading 'The Nightwatch' properly. I came across it in an old secondhand bookshop purely by chance and I've had it sitting on a shelf for a while but haven't actually read it yet, only skimmed through it.

Edited by Francesca Akhtar
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Charles, your mention of Gerry Hemming's story is interesting, I haven't heard it before. Could you expand on it? By windbreaker man, do you mean the man who some people think is Orlando Bosch or Felipe Vidal?

I get confused!

Larry, excuse my ignorance but who is Dennis Harbor? I have not come across that name before.

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Charles, your mention of Gerry Hemming's story is interesting, I haven't heard it before. Could you expand on it? By windbreaker man, do you mean the man who some people think is Orlando Bosch or Felipe Vidal?

I get confused!

Larry, excuse my ignorance but who is Dennis Harbor? I have not come across that name before.

Francesca,

GPH met with Gordon Winslow, Jerry Rose and me for a multi-hour breakfast on the day of Lancer's notorious (to some) Hemming Panel. He was alternately glib, intimidating, funny, humble ... and always in command.

It didn't take me long to realize that I was in the position of a Hollywood development director listening to what amounted to classic "pitches" -- story ideas, some wholly fictional, others a blend of fact and fiction, all intended, in my opinion, to disinform.

Among the most memorable:

-- Chelsea Clinton went on a pre-OKC bombing blind date with ... wait for it ... Tim McVeigh.

-- A former SS sniper/Rat Line emmigrant was in the NORTHWEST TSBD sixth floor window shooting at the guv with a weapon on full automatic. Hemming asked him, Why that particular target? "He didn't bid high enough." Aren't you worried that researchers will reveal your identity? (laughing) "Just make sure they spell my f***ing name right." (Responses mimicked in deep German accent.)

-- The dark complected man standing shoulder-to-shoulder with Umbrella Man and clenching/unclenching his raised fist as the presidential limousine drove past was the character I previously described -- according, again, to Hemming.

Very cinematic, wouldn't you say?

Hemming is a gem -- albeit a conflict stone.

That's all I have. Hope it helps.

Charles

Edited by Charles Drago
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Francesca, Harber was an Interpen associate and you will find a photo of him on the book web site - the photo page is "Shadow Warrors #2"

As I recall he was one of the few associates without significant military experience, he did have some academic background though, hence the

nick name. In 1963 he was engaged in a variety of minor projects including the preparation of a radio broadcast boat...you will find photos

of he, Seymore, de Torres and another of the Interpen folks whose name escapes me at present (maybe Collins) - all working on that boat.

He's mentioned a couple of times in the book and is in the index.

...I enjoyed the description Charles gave of the Hemming panel, I was there to observe that and certainly agree with his assessment. It was

one of the things that convinced me Gerry was an extremely sharp fellow and would likely always be well in control of any interview. I do

recall one comment of his that was most helpful, he suggested that researchers should look at what the national security agencies should have

been doing in the first 24 - 48 hours and compare it to what we see in the record. Chapter 15 of the book draws a good bit on that suggestion.

-- Larry

Charles, your mention of Gerry Hemming's story is interesting, I haven't heard it before. Could you expand on it? By windbreaker man, do you mean the man who some people think is Orlando Bosch or Felipe Vidal?

I get confused!

Larry, excuse my ignorance but who is Dennis Harbor? I have not come across that name before.

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Thanks Larry and Charles for the information. I wish I'd been at the Lancer panel to see GH in person. I gather from what others says too he is somewhat of a 'character'! I never know what to make of him from reading his forum posts. As you say there seems to be some truth in what he says but he comes out with a load of other stuff too!

I'm not sure what he thought Chelsea Clinton had to do with the JFK case though!

Larry, thanks I will go and look Harbor's photo up on the website. Now I'\ve finished the book I think I will understand all the info on there better.

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Thanks Larry and Charles for the information. I wish I'd been at the Lancer panel to see GH in person. I gather from what others says too he is somewhat of a 'character'! I never know what to make of him from reading his forum posts. As you say there seems to be some truth in what he says but he comes out with a load of other stuff too!

I'm not sure what he thought Chelsea Clinton had to do with the JFK case though!

Larry, thanks I will go and look Harbor's photo up on the website. Now I'\ve finished the book I think I will understand all the info on there better.

Hemming, of course, drew no direct connection between Miss Chelsea and JFK. Rather, he offered the Clinton/McVeigh date as an indication of the breadth of his knowledge of black ops, an invitation to appreciate such an event as a means to threaten and control Chelsea's dad (and now, her mom) into silence and acquiescence, and a classic exercise in disinformation.

A true story? With Hemming, who can say? For all of us, who can dismiss it out of hand?

Which was precisely Hemming's point.

Charlie

Edited by Charles Drago
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Larry,

There's a question that's been bugging me about the Wallace prints. If they are indeed his prints, does it necessarily mean Wallace was there, or is it possible to plant fingerprints? Do you need the person's fingers, or just fingerprints to work from? The idea of planting the prints being, of course, to blackmail Johnson, whether Wallace was physically on the scene or not.

Ron

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Ron, that's a question we really should get someone like Ian or Sherry to respond to, I'll try to catch Sherry on it.

My impression though is that while it may be realitve easy to transfer prints on a very smooth material...say pick up a print

with a piece of tape and transfer it to a glass....that placing prints on a cardboard box is not nearly that easy. In fact there

was a lot of speculation about how easy it was for anyone to leave prints on the cardboard boxes unless there hands were

sweaty or someting like that. Great question, will try to get a professional response.

I have to say my own scenario is heavily influenced by Glen Samples work, Loy Factors information - which seems highly credible to me - and

some additional work I've done which essentially places a "sacrificial" team in the TSBD - as hard as that is too swallow. Well it would be

sacrificial unless the President/Johnson was being forced into it and then I suspect that even if caught he would have been able to come up with something

to get them out of it and cover up the whole thing..

-- Larry

Larry,

There's a question that's been bugging me about the Wallace prints. If they are indeed his prints, does it necessarily mean Wallace was there, or is it possible to plant fingerprints? Do you need the person's fingers, or just fingerprints to work from? The idea of planting the prints being, of course, to blackmail Johnson, whether Wallace was physically on the scene or not.

Ron

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