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Does LHO say "axe" instead of asked?


Guest Mark Valenti
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Guest Mark Valenti

When you watch or listen to LHO's brief jail interview session with reporters, does anyone else hear LHO say "...the first thing I heard about it was when a reporter AXE me that question...."

I've known several people from New Orleans and they also use "axe" instead of "asked."

The reason I find it noteworthy is that if LHO was a "double" who did not grow up in New Orleans, he probably would not use this particular mispronunciation.

MV

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When you watch or listen to LHO's brief jail interview session with reporters, does anyone else hear LHO say "...the first thing I heard about it was when a reporter AXE me that question...."

I've known several people from New Orleans and they also use "axe" instead of "asked."

The reason I find it noteworthy is that if LHO was a "double" who did not grow up in New Orleans, he probably would not use this particular mispronunciation.

MV

Indeed, Mark. Saying "Axe" is indicative of low Southern birth. Some of my black friends cringe when they hear an African-American of Southern heritage say "Axe' instead of "Ask". To them, it's the same as hearing someone say "yessum, boss" or "massah".

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Indeed, Mark. Saying "Axe" is indicative of low Southern birth.

Some New Yorkers also use axe innstead of ask. I once had a (gorgeous young black) female friend whose ambition was to go to law School. I spent considerable time coaching her in how to say "ask" instead of Axe. I told her that the trick was to first learn to say "Ass", and then learn to add the letter K. (True story, no kidding).

This young lady had obviously been well brought up, and was reluctand to use the word "Ass."

From what I have read, Lee Oswald was also brought up to avoid the use of vulgar language.

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Indeed, Mark. Saying "Axe" is indicative of low Southern birth.

Some New Yorkers also use axe innstead of ask. I once had a (gorgeous young black) female friend whose ambition was to go to law School. I spent considerable time coaching her in how to say "ask" instead of Axe. I told her that the trick was to first learn to say "Ass", and then learn to add the letter K. (True story, no kidding).

This young lady had obviously been well brought up, and was reluctand to use the word "Ass."

From what I have read, Lee Oswald was also brought up to avoid the use of vulgar language.

I believe "Axe" is a Southern thing. Many of the tell-tale signs of Southern poverty---saying "axe," eating chitlins, greens, and eating other delicacies such as raccoon, appear to northerners as signs of black culture, primarily because the only Southerners most Northerners come in contact with are transplanted blacks. My dad was from Arkansas. We were the only white family I knew to eat scrambled cow brains and okrah.

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Indeed, Mark. Saying "Axe" is indicative of low Southern birth.

Some New Yorkers also use axe innstead of ask. I once had a (gorgeous young black) female friend whose ambition was to go to law School. I spent considerable time coaching her in how to say "ask" instead of Axe. I told her that the trick was to first learn to say "Ass", and then learn to add the letter K. (True story, no kidding).

This young lady had obviously been well brought up, and was reluctand to use the word "Ass."

From what I have read, Lee Oswald was also brought up to avoid the use of vulgar language.

I believe "Axe" is a Southern thing. Many of the tell-tale signs of Southern poverty---saying "axe," eating chitlins, greens, and eating other delicacies such as raccoon, appear to northerners as signs of black culture, primarily because the only Southerners most Northerners come in contact with are transplanted blacks. My dad was from Arkansas. We were the only white family I knew to eat scrambled cow brains and okrah.

Yep!

No doubt why I lost no weight in Central America, & very little in the jungles of S. Vietnam.

Being from South MS, we were used to eating just about anything.

And, as greasy as they seem, even monkey is good when one is hungry enough.

P.S. It was cow brains scrambled with eggs down here, and we could truly get into some stories for those who have never suffered the odor of chitlin's cooking.

P.P.S. See "Popeye"! "Axe me no questions"!

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