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November 22


Myra Bronstein
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It has been... the plane is down safely

104

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It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Edited by Robin Unger
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Guest Stephen Turner

Its said that Clinton based his style on Kennedy, and that Blair based his style on Clinton, What a pity that in both cases the substance is missing........43 YEARS IS A LONG TIME TO HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE DAMN PLAIN TRUTH.

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It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Thanks for the pic Robin, I think it might well be. Never seen that type of contraption before. Imagine lugging that around. Wonder how it worked. I'm still surprised there was any type of mobile phone back then.

It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Thanks for the pic Robin, I think it might well be. Never seen that type of contraption before. Imagine lugging that around. Wonder how it worked. I'm still surprised there was any type of mobile phone back then.

It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Btw, does anyone know who the two men on the left of this photo are, in sunglasses and big hats? They look rather ominous but I probably have a suspicious mind.... :lol:

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It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Thanks for the pic Robin, I think it might well be. Never seen that type of contraption before. Imagine lugging that around. Wonder how it worked. I'm still surprised there was any type of mobile phone back then.

It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Thanks for the pic Robin, I think it might well be. Never seen that type of contraption before. Imagine lugging that around. Wonder how it worked. I'm still surprised there was any type of mobile phone back then.

It has been... the plane is down safely

104

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

9556.jpg

Btw, does anyone know who the two men on the left of this photo are, in sunglasses and big hats? They look rather ominous but I probably have a suspicious mind.... :lol:

remember, we're alot closer than we used to be. what really bothers is me is that the Sheeple don't care that a President was murdered amd those responsible were never brought to justice.

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'Robin Unger'

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

________________

Robin,

below link 3/4 of the way down the page... may be the unit, used primarily for Police and Fire, to the best of my knowledge there was no "mobile press telephone at the time"...

http://www.mbay.net/~wb6nvh/Motadata.htm

my question is who is this guy?

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'Robin Unger'

Today was the first time i had seen this image below.

Look in the backround of this image:

Mobile phone 1960's style.

The man with the PRESS ticket on his suit coat.

Is this what many people have reffered to as the Press Car Phone. ?

________________

Robin,

below link 3/4 of the way down the page... may be the unit, used primarily for Police and Fire, to the best of my knowledge there was no "mobile press telephone at the time"...

http://www.mbay.net/~wb6nvh/Motadata.htm

my question is who is this guy?

Thanks David.

I was reading one of the threads a few days ago, amd i came across some testimony of a member of the PRESS making a "phone call" from one of the cars. ?

I will try and find the thread again.

Thanks for thr link.

Edited by Robin Unger
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Thanks David.

I was reading one of the threads a few days ago, amd i came across some testimony of a member of the PRESS making a "phone call" from one of the cars. ?

I will try and find the thread again.

Thanks for thr link.

Hi Robin,

it was in Merriman Smith's recollection of events that he mentions a 'radio-telephone'. The link to the thread is:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...=Merriman+Smith

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Thanks David.

I was reading one of the threads a few days ago, amd i came across some testimony of a member of the PRESS making a "phone call" from one of the cars. ?

I will try and find the thread again.

Thanks for thr link.

Hi Robin,

it was in Merriman Smith's recollection of events that he mentions a 'radio-telephone'. The link to the thread is:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...=Merriman+Smith

I believe the car itself was the "phone car" and owned by the phone company. The two wire reporters, Smith of UPI and Jack Bell of the AP, rode in it along with acting press secretary Mal Kilduff. Smith grabbed the phone first and made his famous phone call reporting shots before they even reached the hospital. Smith then pretended the phone was broken and wouldn't let Bell use the phone. It is purported that Bell struck Smith repeatedly while trying to get the phone, but Smith refused to give it up, ensuring his papers would have an exclusive. For this he is a legend in journalism circles. He was given the Pulitzer prize.

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I believe the car itself was the "phone car" and owned by the phone company.

To my ageing eyes that is not a cordless phone. The handset the man is holding looks to me to be attached to the vehicle by one of those slinky-type black cords pretty much like the one I have on my home telephone. Those slinky-type cords were in wide use since at least the mid-fifties.

This cord is draped over the man's right shoulder, and casts a shadow downwards on his jacket.

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Thanks David.

I was reading one of the threads a few days ago, amd i came across some testimony of a member of the PRESS making a "phone call" from one of the cars. ?

I will try and find the thread again.

Thanks for thr link.

Hi Robin,

it was in Merriman Smith's recollection of events that he mentions a 'radio-telephone'. The link to the thread is:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.ph...=Merriman+Smith

I believe the car itself was the "phone car" and owned by the phone company. The two wire reporters, Smith of UPI and Jack Bell of the AP, rode in it along with acting press secretary Mal Kilduff. Smith grabbed the phone first and made his famous phone call reporting shots before they even reached the hospital. Smith then pretended the phone was broken and wouldn't let Bell use the phone. It is purported that Bell struck Smith repeatedly while trying to get the phone, but Smith refused to give it up, ensuring his papers would have an exclusive. For this he is a legend in journalism circles. He was given the Pulitzer prize.

------------------------------

Here is Barbie Zelizer quoting William Manchester's blow by blow on the press bus. Note how the entire bus full of reporters seems to have heard one reporters account, even though apparently none of them actually saw the shots. Note also how a second description of the shots is actively prevented so that Merrimans descirption of 'THREE SHOTS" is generally socailized among the whole bus full of reporters:

[smith decided that] the longer he could keep Bell out of Touch with an AP operator, the

longer that lead would be. So he continued to talk, He dicated one take, two takes,

three, four. Indignant, Bell (Jack Bell AP) rose from the center of the rear seat and

demanded the phone. Smith stalled. He insisted that the Dallas operator read back

the dicatation. The wires overhead, he argued, might have interfered with his trans-

mission. No one was deceived by that. Everyone in the car could hear the cackling of

the UPI operator's voice. The relay was perfect. Bell, red-faced and screaming, tried

to wrest the radiophne from him. Smith thrust it between his knees and crouched under

the dash. . . [then] surrendered the phone to Bell. and at that moment, it went dead.

(p. 74, Zelizer, Covering the Body: The Kennedy Assassination, the Media, and the Shaping

of Collective Memory, University of Chicago Press)

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An anniversary

Thanks for starting this thread , Myra, this is a hard few days for a lot of us.

I am going to get some links to some of his best speeches. Rice and such.

THE THOUGHTS OF MANY

Mr.President, J F K.

What were our thoughts of you

Before death stole you from us today

We gave our love, hope and admiration too

Mourning now, we of all the world

Know you ask not-but gave all for your country

Of your strength, through accusation hurled

As you stood undaunted against that enemy

You were the stalwart laborer of a stately nation

As America weeps it shall not forget

The burden, the pain, of your trying station

And your words and deeds remain with us yet.

H.J.Dean [c] 1963

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