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A question for Gerry


William O'Neil
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  • 3 months later...
William

"Robert Surrey w/m/35 ... was at the scene upon our arrival." DPD report of the Walker incident.

Hope this helps,

Jim Root

Jim , I don't believe Hemming was referring to Surrey, who said he was not there when the shot was fired ( tho he may well have been). Walker was seldom alone in the house, at least since the time he supposedly started recieving death threats. Which makes me wonder why he would happen be alone on 4-10, esp. after Surrey spotted cars and people casing the residence in the days prior.

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William

"Robert Surrey w/m/35 ... was at the scene upon our arrival." DPD report of the Walker incident.

Hope this helps,

Jim Root

Just in case forum readers dont know the background of Surrey:

from "History of The American Nazi Party" by Simonelli, Frederick J. link to original article

A brief history of the American Nazi Party (ANP) and the activities of its founder, George Lincoln Rockwell is presented. The ANP is depicted as an insignificant organization which gained notoriety due to the racist and anti-Semitic activities and media tactics of its founder. Newspaper reports around 1964 estimated ANP membership at no more than 100 while Jewish organizations reported that Rockwell's followers numbered between 30 to 50 persons. The ANP was unable to fulfill its objectives due to the lack of funds and was always plagued with financial problems....
...In 1964, Rockwell met his third and last major patron, Robert Surrey of Dallas, Texas. Surrey was co-owner of a modest but prosperous printing company. His partner was former Major General Edwin A. Walker. Surrey and his wife, who was Walker's personal secretary, tried to enlist the reactionary general for Rockwell's cause but failed. Mrs. Surrey left Walker's employ in anger after the general refused to join her and her husband as Rockwell followers. Surrey went by the code name "Max Amann," taken from the name of a prominent German publisher who was one of Adolf Hitler's earliest supporters. Surrey remained a Rockwell loyalist to the end, but left the party after a dispute with Rockwell's successor. In June 1968, Surrey mailed to the people on the ANP mailing list a memorandum that attacked the failure to maintain Rockwell's direction of the party, Surrey said, "my wife and I ... took money from our own pocket ... [and] used our own money for bails and fines for the Stormtroopers; we contributed our home as an office and warehouse for the [ANP] Order Department; we filled the orders, answered the letters of inquiry, and kept things running on a day to day basis; and we raised better than $20,000 in a three year period for the Party."(19)

Rockwell repeatedly made cryptic references to "our backers in Dallas," fostering the illusion of major financial patrons in Texas, which was well known in the 1960s for both its right-wing sympathies and for its rich oil men willing to put their money behind reactionary politics. Actually, Rockwell's Dallas "operation" consisted merely of Robert and Mary Surrey and seven to ten other middle-class Texans. As the Dallas Times Herald reported,

Rockwell's claim that a building had been purchased in Oak Cliff ... can't be substantiated.... The Dallas Nazis couldn't buy a building in Oak Cliff, or anywhere else for that matter, right now. They're broke. They have had financial problems from their start five months ago, the Times Herald learned reliably. They have only a small bank account at Park Cities Bank. ... The local party's sole source of income is contributions and dues from the members. There are no big money contributors in the background. ... So far, authoritative sources report, the Nazis have been thoroughly unsuccessful in tapping any of the rich 'angels' who have helped finance past extremist activities in Dallas.

A few more individuals came through with financial gifts for Rockwell when his party fell into particularly difficult times, but none, with the possible exception of Mr. and Mrs. George Ware of Kentucky, were consistent patrons like the Flemings and the Surreys or had the timely impact of Arrowsmith. The only other individual who made significant and regular financial contributions to Rockwell was a Californian, Ray York, who contributed approximately $25,000 in cash, services, and rent-free use of his property between 1962 and 1967. Rockwell had been introduced to York by Robert Surrey.(20)

Footnotes from above:

19 Max Amann [Robert Surrey], Memorandum to "Admirers and Supporters of the Late George Lincoln Rockwell," June 1968, private collection of James Mason.

20 Jim Lehrer, "Dallas Nazis: Merchants of Fear, Hate," Dallas Times Herald, 11 April 1965, 1, 19.

I would assume that given the above information that anything that Surrey says should be taken with a few "grains of salt". That they claimed to own a building (house?) in Oak Cliff - another coincidence?

“A `strange coincidence', to use a phrase / By which such things are settled nowadays.” - Lord Byron

last line edited - addition of word "building" - CN

Edited by Chris Newton
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