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Picture of JFK and Connally in their seats


Guest Mark Valenti
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Taken from the Groden DVD. Shows relative heights of the two men.

Yep!

That "bunch" just will not go away will it!

Now, if there were only some way in which one could reasonably determine if the shirt also had a "bunch", or perhaps even a "fold" in it??????

P.S. Based on the known calculations, the top of JFK's head was approximately 1 and 1/2 inches higher than was the top of JBC's head.

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Taken from the Groden DVD. Shows relative heights of the two men.

Yep!

That "bunch" just will not go away will it!

Now, if there were only some way in which one could reasonably determine if the shirt also had a "bunch", or perhaps even a "fold" in it??????

P.S. Based on the known calculations, the top of JFK's head was approximately 1 and 1/2 inches higher than was the top of JBC's head.

The "bunch" is a moot issue and wide open for debate as to how the coat was positioned when JFK took the bullet in the back. In fact, didn't the President stop twice to shake hands with people along the motorcade route? The autopsy photo shows the location where the bullet entered the back ... I hope no one is going to say JFK's back muscles bunched up. post-1084-1169421989_thumb.gif

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It would seem to me that the bunch question remains relevant only to those who continue to fantasize that the back wound was up around the base of JFK's neck, where the Rydberg drawing and, more recently, Dale Myers's animation erroneously put it. Does anyone here buy the Rydberg and Myers location of the wound? If so, why was an autopsy photo faked not only to hide a wound in the back of JFK's head (understandable), but to lower the back wound (incomprehensible)?

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Interesting. It's a bit unusual to see one where Kennedy is sitting up like that. Yet the coat still seems to be 'bunched'. I think that's because of two things. His righ arm is raised and his head is back from its normal position, both 'movements' working against each other.

Also this is an interesting photo because it seems that Nellies window is down. When was this photo (film frame) taken?

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Guest Mark Valenti
Interesting. It's a bit unusual to see one where Kennedy is sitting up like that. Yet the coat still seems to be 'bunched'. I think that's because of two things. His righ arm is raised and his head is back from its normal position, both 'movements' working against each other.

Also this is an interesting photo because it seems that Nellies window is down. When was this photo (film frame) taken?

It's from Groden's "Case for Conspiracy" and it's in the early part where he shows the whole motorcade. I don't know which street they're on, I'll go back and see if I can determine from a wider shot if there is one.

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Interesting. It's a bit unusual to see one where Kennedy is sitting up like that. Yet the coat still seems to be 'bunched'. I think that's because of two things. His righ arm is raised and his head is back from its normal position, both 'movements' working against each other.

Also this is an interesting photo because it seems that Nellies window is down. When was this photo (film frame) taken?

It's from Groden's "Case for Conspiracy" and it's in the early part where he shows the whole motorcade. I don't know which street they're on, I'll go back and see if I can determine from a wider shot if there is one.

I may be wrong, but I believe this segment of film is from a sequence as the limo is just leaving Love Field. Regardless, the position of the two individuals, JFK and JBC, at this particular "slice" in time has absolutely nothing to do with what transpired along Elm Street, but in particular the wounding of John Connally. FWIW

Gary

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It would seem to me that the bunch question remains relevant only to those who continue to fantasize that the back wound was up around the base of JFK's neck, where the Rydberg drawing and, more recently, Dale Myers's animation erroneously put it. Does anyone here buy the Rydberg and Myers location of the wound? If so, why was an autopsy photo faked not only to hide a wound in the back of JFK's head (understandable), but to lower the back wound (incomprehensible)?

I think they played fast and loose with the back wound autopsy photo, but didn't alter the location. By this I am saying that they tilted the head back and took the photo at a slight angle so to make the wound look closer to the base of the neck than it really was. Anyone with an once of sense should have known to get an accurate view of the wound in relation to the neck and head would have been to be looking straight forward at both with the body in a straight alignment.

Edited by Bill Miller
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