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What's a "nickle" worth?


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Post #23

Tom,

Speaking of Marguerite's employment, do you know anything about her working as a babysitter during the October-November period of 1963? She was minding the children of Amon G. Carter who was president of the Fort Worth Star Telegram.

James

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Post #24

Sounds completely logical to me.

No, I have only recently begun to have traced how Marguerite Claverie Oswald secured her employment positions while in Texas.

It took long enough to track down exactly who she knew/how she obtained those in New Orleans and other locations.

However, not unlike New Orleans, her various employment seems to have continued to be an end result of knowing someone who knew someone, etc.

As one will recall, she was supposedly "disabled" from her injury with the candy company, yet by the time LHO's paperwork was completed and submitted to get him his early out, suddenly Marguerite has secured a postion at Waco, TX with the Methodists Childrens/Orphans Home.

I do know that the Texas Insurance Representative for whom she reportedly sold life insurance policies for a short period of time, was in fact from New Orleans.

However, it produced no significant results as to how she would have come to know him.

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Post #25

I was once following up on the Amon G. Carter Connection, then got side-tracked.

Thought perhaps you might enjoy these "20-questions" I used to play.

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.assassi...2079782a98dc501

Whereas there has been considerable discussion on U-2 pilot Gary Powers and the

gold coins he was carrying when shot down, and it would appear that I have

nothing better to do than play trivia games:

Who can describe the connection between the U.S. 1822 half-eagle gold coin,

(5$ gold piece), which is one of the most rare of US gold coins, and the

connection that this coin has to the JFK assassination and the TSDB?

Tom P

The winner gets an early peek at who was behind LHO!

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Tom, did anyone ever answer your question.

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No one answered it.

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Amon G. Carter, Publisher of the Fort Worth Star Telegram, Co-founder of

American Airlines, and personal acquaintence of Harold Byrd, acquired the coin

in 1951 at a reported cost of $20,000.00.

The coin now resides in the Smithsonian Institution.

Tom P

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It is merely one of those coincidental items in which various individuals of

wealth and position knew other individuals.

Just as is the coincidence in which the wife of Harold Byrd (the Carruth

family) was a member of one of the most elite societies in the United States.

Also as a member of this society was a Mr. Sims of New Orleans, LA.

Mr. Sims just so happend to be a member of the New Orleans Law firm of "Phelps,

Dunbar, Claverie, Sims".

Of which "Claverie" happened to be Louis B. Claverie, who happened to be the

great Uncle of LHO.

And "Uncle Louis" , the Uncle of Marguerite Claverie, just so happened to be a

former legal associate of the "Wolfe" of the Law Firm for which Marguerite

Claverie worked as a receiptonists in here early/young years.

And, most of those businesses and/or persons for which Marguerite Claverie

and/or LHO worked, were either legal associations of these many attornies, in

which the attornies were the "Registered Agent" for the company, or else these

persons were common acquaintainces through their association in (a) The Boston

Club. ( The REX organization © Sons of The Confederacy organizations.

Tom P

And, this does not even branch into the complete association between Attorney

Louis B. Claverie and one attorney named F.D.V. De La Barre, who operated out

of the same location as the "Gill"/Marcello connection.

Tom P

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Therefore, assuming you have found correct information related to the Amon G. Carter employment, then you have no doubt found "another link in the chain".

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http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/GG/fgr33.html

GREEN, EDWARD HOWLAND ROBINSON

http://coincollector.org/archives/002562.html

http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/scoop_ar...3056&si=124

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http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/GG/fgr33.html

GREEN, EDWARD HOWLAND ROBINSON

http://coincollector.org/archives/002562.html

St. Louis numismatists Burdette G. Johnson and Eric P. Newman owned the coins from the early 1920s to early 1940s.

Newman was the last person to own all five coins

http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/scoop_ar...3056&si=124

The last person to see all five of the coins together is Eric P. Newman, the St. Louis collector and researcher, now 92 years young and counting.

Newman acquired all five coins in 1941 from the executor of Col. Edward H.R. Green's estate as a result of negotiating to purchase Green's "Nickel Collection."

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http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...757C0A96E958260

http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/basscat...ALE1/b1-1-a.htm

In the meantime, Colonel E.H.R. Green, who began collecting coins in the World War I era, and who at one time owned all five known 1913 Liberty Head nickels (and, well-known in the philatelic field, all 100 of the known 1918 24¢ inverted air mail stamps), also became a serious collector of currency. However, he made the mistake-as a number of others did-of storing many (but not all) of his notes in transparent cellulose acetate holders (the same sort of material that was used in the early days for motion picture film). These holders chemically reacted with the notes, and made them brittle. As a result, when his estate was evaluated after his death on June 8, 1936, it was found that many prized notes-including great rarities-had literally crumbled to fragments, chips, and dust. It took eight armored trucks to move all of the valuables in his estate to a vault in the Chase Bank, New York City, for safekeeping. Eric P. Newman, a law student in St. Louis, desired to obtain a St. Louis Refunding Certificate issued in the 1860s, and wrote to the Chase Bank to see if he could buy the Green specimen. He was advised that this was not possible, but it was possible to buy a group of currency in which the St. Louis rarity would be included! This opened the door to many purchases, which were originated by Newman and from which many coins and notes were then sold through Burdette G. Johnson, St. Louis dealer. (This is from a recollection given by Newman at a testimonial dinner tendered for him at the Explorers' Club, New York City, by the American Numismatic Society, October 25, 1996). Johnson was in the right place at the right time in the 1930s, for earlier in the decade he was one of two appraisers (Henry Chapman was the other) of the Virgil M. Brand estate.

Perhaps spurred by the backwater of the Grinnell Collection and the availability of notes on the market, more and more dealers added such to their offerings. Meanwhile, Texas became a focal point of interest with Amon G. Carter, Jr., in Fort Worth, sparing no effort to put together a tremendous holding, perhaps to continue the family numismatic traditions without duplicating what his father had done (rare coins). In time, the Carter Collection became known as the finest of its kind. In Dallas, Robert F. Schermerhorn and W.A. Philpott, Jr., both of whom will be discussed later in the present introduction, were central to the specialty. In Texas, Tom Bain was also early in the currency game as were, by the end of the 1950s, Bob Medlar, John N. Rowe III, and Mike Brownlee.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/BassLetters/Letter12.htm

Eric P. Newman is an attorney from St. Louis, Missouri and is President of the Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society, formed to support the numismatic research community similar to that of the HBF. Mr. Newman serves on the Council of the American Numismatic Society.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.chicagocoinclub.org/projects/PiN/ccc.html

Education-minded members had the opportunity to further broaden their horizons from the fall of 1965 till spring of 1966, when Roosevelt University offered a class titled "Numismatics, The Story of Civilization." Many eminent numismatists from across the country came and delivered lectures under the joint sponsorship of the University and the Professional Numismatists Guild. Club members took advantage of this unique educational opportunity and many were in attendance at each lecture. Among the speakers were: Gilroy Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. V. Clain-Stefanelli, Walter Breen, Mr. and Mrs. R. Henry Norweb, Hans Schulman, Eric P. Newman, Amon Carter,

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.southerngoldsociety.org/neworleans.html

In addition to the US-designed coins, the mint also produced the Confederate half dollar, which featured the US obverse as its reverse and a newly designed obverse, which showed the Confederate coat of arms. Mr. A.H.M. Patterson, a New Orleans engraver and die sinker, produced one Confederate obverse die, which was used to produce four coins in early April 1861. The coins were originally presented to: Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, Benjamin F. Taylor, Chief Coiner of the New Orleans mint, Prof. John L. Riddell of Tulane University (former melter and refiner of the New Orleans mint) and Dr. Edward Ames of New Orleans. Today, one is owned by the American Numismatic Society, one is owned by the Eric P. Newman Education Foundation and the other two are owned privately.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://record.wustl.edu/web/page/normal/563.html

Background on Eric P. Newman

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://sec.edgar-online.com/1994/04/26/00/...63/Section4.asp

Eric P. Newman 82 1966 34,178(9) 1,554,024(10) 1,588,202 7.2%

Eric P. Newman was Secretary and Director of Legal Matters for

the Corporation from 1951 to 1987 and Executive Vice President

from 1968 to 1987.

Eric P. Newman and Julian I. Edison are brothers-in-law. Andrew E.

Newman is the son of Eric P. Newman and the nephew of Julian I.

Edison.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Name: BURT'S SHOE STORES, INC.

Domicile Address: 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BUILDING, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

File Date: 10/10/1955

President: BERNARD EDISON, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Vice President: THOMAS MCCAIN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Secretary: ERIC P. NEWMAN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Name: CHANDLER'S SHOE STORES, INC.

Domicile Address: 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BUILDING, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

File Date: 10/10/1955

President: BERNARD EDISON, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Vice President: THOMAS MCCAIN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Secretary: ERIC P. NEWMAN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online...s/GG/fgr33.html

GREEN, EDWARD HOWLAND ROBINSON

http://coincollector.org/archives/002562.html

St. Louis numismatists Burdette G. Johnson and Eric P. Newman owned the coins from the early 1920s to early 1940s.

Newman was the last person to own all five coins

http://scoop.diamondgalleries.com/scoop_ar...3056&si=124

The last person to see all five of the coins together is Eric P. Newman, the St. Louis collector and researcher, now 92 years young and counting.

Newman acquired all five coins in 1941 from the executor of Col. Edward H.R. Green's estate as a result of negotiating to purchase Green's "Nickel Collection."

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...757C0A96E958260

http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/basscat...ALE1/b1-1-a.htm

In the meantime, Colonel E.H.R. Green, who began collecting coins in the World War I era, and who at one time owned all five known 1913 Liberty Head nickels (and, well-known in the philatelic field, all 100 of the known 1918 24¢ inverted air mail stamps), also became a serious collector of currency. However, he made the mistake-as a number of others did-of storing many (but not all) of his notes in transparent cellulose acetate holders (the same sort of material that was used in the early days for motion picture film). These holders chemically reacted with the notes, and made them brittle. As a result, when his estate was evaluated after his death on June 8, 1936, it was found that many prized notes-including great rarities-had literally crumbled to fragments, chips, and dust. It took eight armored trucks to move all of the valuables in his estate to a vault in the Chase Bank, New York City, for safekeeping. Eric P. Newman, a law student in St. Louis, desired to obtain a St. Louis Refunding Certificate issued in the 1860s, and wrote to the Chase Bank to see if he could buy the Green specimen. He was advised that this was not possible, but it was possible to buy a group of currency in which the St. Louis rarity would be included! This opened the door to many purchases, which were originated by Newman and from which many coins and notes were then sold through Burdette G. Johnson, St. Louis dealer. (This is from a recollection given by Newman at a testimonial dinner tendered for him at the Explorers' Club, New York City, by the American Numismatic Society, October 25, 1996). Johnson was in the right place at the right time in the 1930s, for earlier in the decade he was one of two appraisers (Henry Chapman was the other) of the Virgil M. Brand estate.

Perhaps spurred by the backwater of the Grinnell Collection and the availability of notes on the market, more and more dealers added such to their offerings. Meanwhile, Texas became a focal point of interest with Amon G. Carter, Jr., in Fort Worth, sparing no effort to put together a tremendous holding, perhaps to continue the family numismatic traditions without duplicating what his father had done (rare coins). In time, the Carter Collection became known as the finest of its kind. In Dallas, Robert F. Schermerhorn and W.A. Philpott, Jr., both of whom will be discussed later in the present introduction, were central to the specialty. In Texas, Tom Bain was also early in the currency game as were, by the end of the 1950s, Bob Medlar, John N. Rowe III, and Mike Brownlee.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/BassLetters/Letter12.htm

Eric P. Newman is an attorney from St. Louis, Missouri and is President of the Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society, formed to support the numismatic research community similar to that of the HBF. Mr. Newman serves on the Council of the American Numismatic Society.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.chicagocoinclub.org/projects/PiN/ccc.html

Education-minded members had the opportunity to further broaden their horizons from the fall of 1965 till spring of 1966, when Roosevelt University offered a class titled "Numismatics, The Story of Civilization." Many eminent numismatists from across the country came and delivered lectures under the joint sponsorship of the University and the Professional Numismatists Guild. Club members took advantage of this unique educational opportunity and many were in attendance at each lecture. Among the speakers were: Gilroy Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. V. Clain-Stefanelli, Walter Breen, Mr. and Mrs. R. Henry Norweb, Hans Schulman, Eric P. Newman, Amon Carter,

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.southerngoldsociety.org/neworleans.html

In addition to the US-designed coins, the mint also produced the Confederate half dollar, which featured the US obverse as its reverse and a newly designed obverse, which showed the Confederate coat of arms. Mr. A.H.M. Patterson, a New Orleans engraver and die sinker, produced one Confederate obverse die, which was used to produce four coins in early April 1861. The coins were originally presented to: Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, Benjamin F. Taylor, Chief Coiner of the New Orleans mint, Prof. John L. Riddell of Tulane University (former melter and refiner of the New Orleans mint) and Dr. Edward Ames of New Orleans. Today, one is owned by the American Numismatic Society, one is owned by the Eric P. Newman Education Foundation and the other two are owned privately.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://record.wustl.edu/web/page/normal/563.html

Background on Eric P. Newman

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://sec.edgar-online.com/1994/04/26/00/...63/Section4.asp

Eric P. Newman 82 1966 34,178(9) 1,554,024(10) 1,588,202 7.2%

Eric P. Newman was Secretary and Director of Legal Matters for

the Corporation from 1951 to 1987 and Executive Vice President

from 1968 to 1987.

Eric P. Newman and Julian I. Edison are brothers-in-law. Andrew E.

Newman is the son of Eric P. Newman and the nephew of Julian I.

Edison.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Name: BURT'S SHOE STORES, INC.

Domicile Address: 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BUILDING, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

File Date: 10/10/1955

President: BERNARD EDISON, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Vice President: THOMAS MCCAIN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Secretary: ERIC P. NEWMAN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Name: CHANDLER'S SHOE STORES, INC.

Domicile Address: 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BUILDING, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

File Date: 10/10/1955

President: BERNARD EDISON, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Vice President: THOMAS MCCAIN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

Secretary: ERIC P. NEWMAN, 501 N. BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO 63102

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/m_j_russ/meyers.htm

Q. What were the chief accounts that Ero had that you would have worked with?

A. That I would have worked with?

Q. Yes.

A. Well, Sears, Roebuck, of course. In this area the biggest and probably the main account around here was a company called Gibson, Gibson Discount Centers

A. They were called Gibson Discount Stores, but they were owned by a company called Howard Brothers who have since ceased, you know. They kicked out the franchise. They are now running their own stores, Howard Brothers Stores in Monroe. I know Harvey and I drove there. He went around with me to visit customers.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louisiana Secretary of State

Detailed Record

Name: HOWARD BROS. DISCOUNT STORES, INC.

Prior Name: GIBSON'S WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS, INC.

Mailing Address: C/O PRENTICE-HALL CORP. SYSTEM, 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BLDG., NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

Domicile Address: 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BLDG., NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

File Date: 06/27/1961

Registered Agent (Appointed 5/28/1987): PRENTICE-HALL CORP. SYSTEM, 1006 HIBERNIA BANK BLDG., NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

James!

Hope that provides the linkage to Amon Carter, as well as other things.

Tom

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[quote name=Thomas H. Purvis' date='Apr 12 2007,

http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/russ/m_j_russ/meyers.htm

Q. What were the chief accounts that Ero had that you would have worked with?

A. That I would have worked with?

Q. Yes.

A. Well, Sears, Roebuck, of course. In this area the biggest and probably the main account around here was a company called Gibson, Gibson Discount Centers

A. They were called Gibson Discount Stores, but they were owned by a company called Howard Brothers who have since ceased, you know. They kicked out the franchise. They are now running their own stores, Howard Brothers Stores in Monroe. I know Harvey and I drove there. He went around with me to visit customers.

---------------

Wait a minute, Where does ERO come in again?

Thanks,

BK

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Thanks, Tom.

Lots to ponder there.

As to the Gibson Discount Stores, there was one in Irving and the franchise owner was a man named Cecil Strech. Allegedly he was associated with the Paines but I have not been able to confirm that.

Does anyone know if Ruth Paine ever mentioned him in any of her interviews?

James

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Let me add my 5 cents. See link connecting American Airlines ,Troy Post and LeMay. The preassassination transactions of POST-LING-Byrd in LTV were considered assasinated related by PD Scott. Post was one of 4 owners of a micro-island in HI. One of the others was Edwin Pauley. Pauley was listed 4 times in DEMOH'S phone volumes. Pauley was the business partner of GHWB in Perforaciones Marinas del Golfo (AKA PERMARGO). Mae Brussell was told that the shooters came up from Mexico with the help EH Hunt and PERMARGO. If so, they had been practicing (IMHO) the assassination at the 18,000 acre ranch owned by the fellow who tookover the PO BOX of LHO. THANKS sg

http://www.falconfoundation.org/history.htm

Edited by Steven Gaal
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