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Forum Rule Against Swearing


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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :)

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:ice

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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :ice

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:ice

I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :)

Edited by Sid Walker
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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :ice

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:ice

__________________________________

You're so,... uh..., uh..., funny, My-ra...!!!! (Keep up the good work... :) )

--Thomas

__________________________________

Edited by Thomas Graves
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I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

It was worse for me. I taught (or did not teach) dozens of girls like Myra. The main aim was to be the centre of attention. Being told off was what they wanted.

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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :blink:

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:huh:

I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

**********************************************************

Yeah, and we were the ones who wore those black lace bras you guys ached to catch a peek of. Even if it was only a strap slipping down from under the sleeve of a blouse, or off the shoulder from under a sleeveless shirt.

We were also some of the most creative writers in English Lit., and you might have even seen a paper or two of ours hanging up on the border of molding that surrounded the classroom. Or, maybe a schematic drawing of a cathode ray tube would be on display in the physics classroom, because we were talented and detailed oriented, and could be counted on when asked to draft the circuitry involved in an electrical transformer, on the blackboard for the rest of the class to copy. You see, the teacher recognized something dynamically different about us, and could count on us to deliver it when the chips were down, or when a deadline needed to be met.

Everyone wanted to copy our notes, they even offered to pay us for them.

And, when we grew up, we became a force to be reckoned with.

Edited by Terry Mauro
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I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

It was worse for me. I taught (or did not teach) dozens of girls like Myra. The main aim was to be the centre of attention. Being told off was what they wanted.

OOoooooo John, you knooooow what I want. I want to be disciplined by a stern British schoolmaster 'cause I talk dirty. Tell me I'm a naughty naughty girl...

Spank me John.

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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :blink:

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:huh:

I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

**********************************************************

Yeah, and we were the ones who wore those black lace bras you guys ached to catch a peek of. Even if it was only a strap slipping down from under the sleeve of a blouse, or off the shoulder from under a sleeveless shirt.

We were also some of the most creative writers in English Lit., and you might have even seen a paper or two of ours hanging up on the border of molding that surrounded the classroom. Or, maybe a schematic drawing of a cathode ray tube would be on display in the physics classroom, because we were talented and detailed oriented, and could be counted on when asked to draft the circuitry involved in an electrical transformer, on the blackboard for the rest of the class to copy. You see, the teacher recognized something dynamically different about us, and could count on us to deliver it when the chips were down, or when a deadline needed to be met.

Everyone wanted to copy our notes, they even offered to pay us for them.

And, when we grew up, we became a force to be reckoned with.

How'd you know I had a 3.73 cumulative gpa for my electronics degree?

Gosh diddley doodly darn you are one psychic woman Terry.

Ya little minx.

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I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

It was worse for me. I taught (or did not teach) dozens of girls like Myra. The main aim was to be the centre of attention. Being told off was what they wanted.

************************************************************

"The main aim was to be the centre of attention. Being told off was what they wanted."

Is that right, John? I can't believe you said that. Myra hasn't been derogatory, except one time that I'm aware of, and I told her to be careful she didn't get branded as a trouble maker, like myself. If you need to single someone out, single me out. I'm the one who cusses like a sailor around here, not Myra!

And, when it comes to swearing, keep this in mind. In NYC, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, at least when I was growing up, calling someone a stupid son of a bitch, or a stupid bastard, were thought of more as terms of endearment than cursing someone out. The F word, and the C word were the ones considered to be "fighting" words.

But, say no more. I'll keep electrical tape plastered across my mouth and twisted around my fingers to remind me not to cuss anymore. Bless me Father for I have sinned...

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This is an educational forum that is read by young people. Therefore, we do not expect people to use swear words in their postings. In European culture, swearing is an act of aggression and is not something we encourage in educational settings.

It has been brought to my attention that one member, Myra Bronstein, has reacted very aggressively when being warned by moderators about their language. I can assure her and other like-minded members, that swearing is not acceptable and that moderators have my permission to remove such language when it appears in postings.

Well aint this a cold slap in the groin. :blink:

Say there... is "groin" a swear word?

I don't want to screw up and have Antti get his knickers all in a twist again.

...

Oops! Is "screw up" a swear?

Gosh, it's such a verbal mine field when moderators decide to police language.

And I do so want to avoid having my gosh darn diddley doodley posts censored.

(Is "gosh darn" a swear?)

:huh:

I remember girls like you from schooldays, Myra.

You sat at the back of class, giggled a lot, told great jokes, popped bubble gum when teacher's back was turned (and sometimes stuck it under the desk), had the best parties and my mum warned me about you.

Now I know what happened when you grew up :lol:

**********************************************************

Yeah, and we were the ones who wore those black lace bras you guys ached to catch a peek of. Even if it was only a strap slipping down from under the sleeve of a blouse, or off the shoulder from under a sleeveless shirt.

We were also some of the most creative writers in English Lit., and you might have even seen a paper or two of ours hanging up on the border of molding that surrounded the classroom. Or, maybe a schematic drawing of a cathode ray tube would be on display in the physics classroom, because we were talented and detailed oriented, and could be counted on when asked to draft the circuitry involved in an electrical transformer, on the blackboard for the rest of the class to copy. You see, the teacher recognized something dynamically different about us, and could count on us to deliver it when the chips were down, or when a deadline needed to be met.

Everyone wanted to copy our notes, they even offered to pay us for them.

And, when we grew up, we became a force to be reckoned with.

How'd you know I had a 3.73 cumulative gpa for my electronics degree?

Gosh diddley doodly darn you are one psychic woman Terry.

Ya little minx.

*****************************************************************

Because, I had a 3.6 in Radiologic Technology and Nuclear Medicine, that's how. I recognized you a mile away. Birds of a feather, Sister-girl...

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I have written swear words in various postings in the past, and am not particularly proud of it. There are others who swear, some more than others. There are blatant anti-semitic comments made. There are blatant sexist comments made. Then of course various derogatory comments in more subtle forms attacking those who hold different opinions or have a different take on things. Myra is not alone. I think the younger set perhaps can be more prone to overtly rash comments but there certainly are elders who also set poor examples, particularly in manipulatively subtle ways. One thing about Myra (and other younger members) that comes across is an independence of spirit and a flexibility of mind. That's not a bad foundation IMO.

Politeness not necessarily a European trait, though people have for centuries learnt to coexist closer and closer together. Then on the other hand about 60 years ago people were particularly nasty. Killing each other and so on.

In OZ at the moment there is very little constraints with little children swearing on ads on telly. Simultaneously, a footballer has just been fined 5000 au$ for swearing during a prematch speech.

I find myself more and more hesitant in expressing opinions on these sorts of things. Fascism is really the only true enemy of the people of the earth. And it depends on divisiveness. IMO the more people try (note: 'try', that's good enough) to be respectful of each other, the more the destructive elements stand out and can be dealt with.

I found when in the US (what I took as(which is not to say it actually was, it was my perception)) extreme rudeness, a 'thank you' often met by 'uhu', and also wonderful polite kindness and helpfulness. Strangely enough I generally found much consideration and tolerance where I least expected it in NY, NY.

It was interesting being at an anti war demo in Washington where a group of Christian Fundamentalists on one side of the street heaped abuse on Anti war demonstrators on the other side of the street who responded in kind, and a large police presence who basically just made their prescence known, speaking politely with people on all sides. One copper was quite charming in 'breaking ranks' to go into the anti war group to give a delighted hi to a little puppy dog.

I found the Scandinavian countries by far the most polite. Perhaps that is a product of until 100 years or so ago, come winter, everyone hunkered down together for months indoors.

In OZ if you can't take some pretty rude sounding comments (which, like it sounds similar to the bronx, is how aussies often actually express a liking for each other, particularly among males) you can be pretty miserable.

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I found the Scandinavian countries by far the most polite. Perhaps that is a product of until 100 years or so ago, come winter, everyone hunkered down together for months indoors.

I agree, however, I don't think it has anything to do with the weather. The people of Denmark are also very polite.

I have also found Australians polite in a matey sort of way. They remind me of the working-class community that I was brought up in. In England we seem to have lost this. A lot of Aussie immigrants also came from this working-class background. Maybe, because of their laid-back lifestyle, they have retained this style of behaviour.

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I found the Scandinavian countries by far the most polite. Perhaps that is a product of until 100 years or so ago, come winter, everyone hunkered down together for months indoors.

I agree, however, I don't think it has anything to do with the weather. The people of Denmark are also very polite.

I have also found Australians polite in a matey sort of way. They remind me of the working-class community that I was brought up in. In England we seem to have lost this. A lot of Aussie immigrants also came from this working-class background. Maybe, because of their laid-back lifestyle, they have retained this style of behaviour.

Yes, in thinking about it, (while I think it is a factor as pre electricity etc, culture prevailed as a result of close accomodation with family and neighbours during the long dark months), you are probably right. The reason may lie in the welfare state, where people grow up feeling valued and nurtured and therefore behave accordingly.

____________

a joke: two Danes, two Finns, two Swedes and two Norwegians are stranded on a desert island. Within a year, the Danes have started a furniture co-op, the Norwegians a fishing fleet, the Finns are supplying the vodka, and the two Swedes aren't talking because they haven't been introduced yet.

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Not to be killjoy, but getting back to John's point, it doesn't matter one iota about the intent of the swearing. If it is considered an act of aggression in Europe, that should be the end of it. This forum, after all, is dominated numerically by Europeans. As John also pointed out, an education forum should use the language of academia... not that I have any idea what that is, but I'm reasonably certain about what it's not...

I do have a personal view on the subject based on researching the history of "swear" words a few years back. Most of the "worst" words were taken from the Germanic languages and were merely slang words used by commoners. If someone of noble breeding wanted to offend their peers, they would resort to using the commoner's slang. Over time, this type of language came to be considered vulgar - not because of the words themselves - but because of where those words came from: the slums and villages of the filthy poor. ptui.

But that's probably a subject for a different forum. Bottom line here: perception is what counts... and I don't disagree with that.

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