Doug Belshaw

ICT for collaborative teaching and learning

23 posts in this topic

Graham, thanks for taking the time to advise me on this. It's something I'd been avoiding, in all fairness, but something which was going to have to be tackled sooner or later!

1. How do you ensure that the work submitted to you by teachers is original and that all copyright clearances and other permissions, e.g. for reproduction of texts, photos, recordings, have been granted?

I have added your 'Guaranteee of originality' clause to the registration agreement to which users of the shareforum are obliged to agree when registering. I hope you don't mind! :D

2. How do you protect original work submitted by teachers, e.g. so that it doesn't end up, for example, on someone else's website or, worse still, in a commercial training pack?

I've heard a lot recently about the Creative Commons license, so I investigated it further. As a result of the excellent guidance on the Creative Commons website, your website and the BECTA website , I've added a box at the top of the index page to the shareform which links to this Creative Commons license.

Thanks again for the advice! :rolleyes:

:plane Doug

Edited by Doug Belshaw

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Feel free to use the "Guarantee of originality" clause.

Copyright is an issue that teachers seem to try and avoid, but it's most important to get it right now that so much material is freely available on the Web and shared resources are becoming more common. However, just because something is on the Web it doesn't necessarily belong in the public domain, and teachers who spend a lot of time creating useful materials need to have some assurance that their work is duly acknowledged and not handed out willy-nilly. I publish most of what I write on the Web these days, and I have found it cropping up in all sorts of places. without my permission having been sought and without my authorship having been mentioned. Universities often use JISC's plagiarism detection service these days - which will trace unreferenced material in students' assignments. I could cite several cases of students having been caught out in this way.

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I get a few comments praising the shareforum in general, but no specific comments or suggestions really, unfortunately! I'd like to eventually setup a site which fosters and encourages collaboration in terms of ideas and resources between teachers of all disciplines across all kinds of boundaries.

What would you like to get from us, teachers not teaching in United Kingdom? Teachers teaching in other languages then English? Teachers using another curriculum than teachers in your country use? Teachers teaching at another level than you teach?

Can you find anything specific I could contribute to your share forum?

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It's now been over 3 years since the very enjoyable time we spent in Toulouse discussing ICT for collaborative teaching and learning. Since then, I've moved on to a new school, and the shareforum has gone from strength-to-strength. Some observations:

1. Be a catalyst

I went to the Head of my current school to ask what could be done about the situation we had. Lots of hardware and software, but no training for staff. As of this academic year I'm E-Learning Staff Tutor with a reduced teaching timetable and a budget. :D

2. Have patience

After a few incarnations, I'm fairly happy with the shareforum. It's now at www.historyshareforum.com and currently stands at just under 700 members. It's turned into a great place to get resources you can actually edit to be useful!

3. Run with new technologies

Web 2.0 has been somewhat of a revolution. The biggest changes to the way I work and collaborate have come through the micro social-networking site Twitter and the hard-to-explain FriendFeed.

4. Start new communities

The famous ice hockey player Wayne Gretzsky once said "You miss 100% of shots you never take." Taking that as a principle, I've attempted to start several communities around a theme. One that worked and is now a year old is EdTechRoundup. We're a group of mainly UK-based educators, but with no geographical bar on membership. We meet virtually on a Sunday night to discuss issues and resources relating to educational technology, and then release our discussions as podcasts. It's going well so far!

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank again all those involved in the project and for inviting a fresh-faced NQT to present. :)

:plane: Doug

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It's now been over 3 years since the very enjoyable time we spent in Toulouse discussing ICT for collaborative teaching and learning. Since then, I've moved on to a new school, and the shareforum has gone from strength-to-strength. Some observations:

1. Be a catalyst

I went to the Head of my current school to ask what could be done about the situation we had. Lots of hardware and software, but no training for staff. As of this academic year I'm E-Learning Staff Tutor with a reduced teaching timetable and a budget. :D

2. Have patience

After a few incarnations, I'm fairly happy with the shareforum. It's now at www.historyshareforum.com and currently stands at just under 700 members. It's turned into a great place to get resources you can actually edit to be useful!

3. Run with new technologies

Web 2.0 has been somewhat of a revolution. The biggest changes to the way I work and collaborate have come through the micro social-networking site Twitter and the hard-to-explain FriendFeed.

4. Start new communities

The famous ice hockey player Wayne Gretzsky once said "You miss 100% of shots you never take." Taking that as a principle, I've attempted to start several communities around a theme. One that worked and is now a year old is EdTechRoundup. We're a group of mainly UK-based educators, but with no geographical bar on membership. We meet virtually on a Sunday night to discuss issues and resources relating to educational technology, and then release our discussions as podcasts. It's going well so far!

I'd like to take this opportunity to thank again all those involved in the project and for inviting a fresh-faced NQT to present. :)

:blink:: Doug

It is very encouraging that you have made so much progress over the last 3 years. The success of "shareforum" is especially heart-warming. I thought this would become an important feature of the internet, especially in local history, when I first started my website in 1997. I have been told my a lot of teachers have downloaded my web pages and have adapted them for their own use. However, I have seen very little of teachers posting their own local history materials online.

Could you provide any links to new websites being produced by young history teachers that have materials that can be used by other educators? I am interested in the new generation of "Andrew Field".

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Dear Doug,

If ever you have a bad day and are thinking 'Why do I bother?', just keep in mind that I have bumped into lots of history teachers who rave about your site (including Johannes) since you did the seminar.

Best wishes,

Terry

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Hi all,

I urge my PGCE students to consider ways in which they can use ICT as a tool to aid the delivery of lessons, planning and engagement as well as insisting that they keep abreast of developments in ICT and your site is fantastic :lol: .

Johannes

Edited by Johannes Ahrenfelt

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