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Nico Zijlstra

Jokes as a source in History

3 posts in this topic

I've written a simple worksheet/lesson about jokes told by people in the former GDR.

Jokes were used as a kind of subtle protest against the SED-regime of Ulbricht and Honecker.

I'm using German originals in my Dutch class, but I found a series in Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GDR_jokes

I'll try to incorporate the English version into my website and publish it on E-Help. A German version can be added as well.

During the war in occupied Europe jokes were often told? Anyone a clue where I can find those? An idea perhaps?

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I've written a simple worksheet/lesson about jokes told by people in the former GDR.

Jokes were used as a kind of subtle protest against the SED-regime of Ulbricht and Honecker.

I'm using German originals in my Dutch class, but I found a series in Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GDR_jokes

I'll try to incorporate the English version into my website and publish it on E-Help. A German version can be added as well.

During the war in occupied Europe jokes were often told? Anyone a clue where I can find those? An idea perhaps?

Good idea. I have always liked the idea of using jokes in history lessons. I believe I used to be known as a "joke teacher" (thought I would say that before Andy Walker made the same point).

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Humour is certainly an important factor in establishing the kind of relaxed alertness needed for learning to take place.

All the teachers I have seen both struggle with discipline and struggle to teach have lacked a sense of humour. I would recommend "The Laughing Classroom" by Diane Loomans, Karen Kolberg and Martha Weston as essential reading for anyone training to be a teacher.

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