Jump to content
The Education Forum
  • Announcements

    • Evan Burton

      OPEN REGISTRATION BY EMAIL ONLY !!! PLEASE CLICK ON THIS TITLE FOR INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR REGISTRATION!:   06/03/2017

      We have 5 requirements for registration: 1.Sign up with your real name. (This will be your Username) 2.A valid email address 3.Your agreement to the Terms of Use, seen here: http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=21403. 4. Your photo for use as an avatar  5.. A brief biography. We will post these for you, and send you your password. We cannot approve membership until we receive these. If you are interested, please send an email to: edforumbusiness@outlook.com We look forward to having you as a part of the Forum! Sincerely, The Education Forum Team
Sign in to follow this  
John Simkin

Soldiers in the Laboratory

Recommended Posts

A report - Soldiers in the Laboratory, has just been published by Scientists for Global Responsibility (SGR). It argues that by concentrating on technological solutions, military science narrows thinking on security issues. Instead of addressing the social problems at the root of terrorism or civil conflict, researchers have instead focused on biochemical warfare sensors, advanced field equipment for infantrymen or missile technologies that could fuel another arms race. British defence chiefs spend only 6% of their research budget on preventing conflict.

According to the report almost a third of all public spending on research is funded by the Ministry of Defence - far more than is spent on research by the National Health Service. It adds: "British universities are caught up in a new wave of military partnerships, and young researchers have switched to high-technology weapons-based research in a dangerous atmosphere of commercialisation and secrecy."

Steven Rose, a brain and behaviour scientist at the Open University said: "Ever since 1945, and under Tory and Labour governments, Britain has spent disproportionately more of its research and development budget on military technology than any other country ... "

Global military spending in 2003 stood at $956bn, the report says, of which the US spent 40%.

Philip Webber, chairman of Scientists for Global Responsibility, said: "The report reveals a new military-industrial complex of the 21st century - military-led funding of exotic technologies and hi-tech weaponry rather than technology to address pressing social needs."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×