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Richard Jones-Nerzic

WWI - causes simulation

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As part of the IST's commitment to generating 'innovative classroom resources' Russ has been working on a new simulation about the causes of WWI. This is one of the few topics taught in every European country and might be an ideal way of beginning to address the Progress Report criticism that we are not delivering on the 'multilingual innovative resources' front.

Causes of WWI - simulation

If we could translate this in to Swedish, German, French etc. we could have a fairly unique resource.

What do our potential 'translators' think?

I looked through the simulation and it seems to be an interesting try to enhance students learning and skills. I shall check it few more times still.

When Anders translation is done I would like to check its benefits with my Swedish students.

Eventually can I give a try for translation to my language later.

At this stage I would rather to work with (and improve) my own tasks: digital storytelling plus a movie about Czech women and Czech history of the last 100 years.

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Charo and I are working on the translation. Too much work here in our schools now!

What does exactly mean "Mad as March Hares"? Does it mean "completely mad"?

In Spanish, when we say that somebody is completely crazy, insane, we say that he is "loco como una cabra" ("mad as goat") If I translate "Mad as March Hares" directly into Spanish, the result is meaningless.

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In the worksheet TIMELINE:

28th July: Austria declares war. (not 29th July)

http://zis.uibk.ac.at/quellen/rauch11b.htm

http://firstworldwar.com/onthisday/1914_07_28.htm

I'll send the amendment later. I'll fix it in my versions on my own server

http://www.sintermeerten.nl/projecten/gesc...nl/frameset.htm

http://www.sintermeerten.nl/projecten/gesc..._D/frameset.htm

Edited by Nico Zijlstra

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In Spanish, when we say that somebody is completely crazy, insane, we say that he is "loco como una cabra" ("mad as goat") If I translate "Mad as March Hares" directly into Spanish, the result is meaningless.
Mad as a goat is perfect. :ph34r:

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In Spanish, when we say that somebody is completely crazy, insane, we say that he is "loco como una cabra" ("mad as goat") If I translate "Mad as March Hares" directly into Spanish, the result is meaningless.

Mad as a goat is perfect. :lol:

I like spanish idioms

I have always found "no me tome el pelo" rather appropriate to my circumstances :lol:

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Guest Russel Tarr
If I translate "Mad as March Hares" directly into Spanish, the result is meaningless.

March hares are supposed to be mad a bit like leaping lambs...although strangely in "Alice in Wonderland" the phrase is "Mad as a hatter" (although his best friend is the March Hare...) Anyway, the phrase "You English are Mad, Mad as March Hares" was delivered by Wilhelm II - in English - to the Daily Telegraph in 1908. The best thing would be to put a direct translation into Spanish, and then provide a Spanish equivalent, I guess!

:)

teaparty.jpg

Edited by Russel Tarr

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Thanks for your linguistic pieces of advice.

I will translate into Spanish by using the Spanish idiom and adding up the English expression:

"Vosotros ingleses, estáis locos como cabras (mad as March hares)"

Fortunately, we have no more emperors in Europe!

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I have just sent to Russel the Spanish version of the simulation which Charo and I have translated.

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Guest Russel Tarr

...and I have now uploaded that one too!

Could you please let me know, though, what the word for "Correct!" and "Try Again!" would be in Spanish? At present, answering factual questions gets an English response.

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Correct! is not difficult.. ¡Correcto!

Try it again! ¡Inténtalo otra vez!

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Guest Russel Tarr

Many thanks for that - and for all the work by Nico, Juan Carlos and Charo so far on the project. It's starting to shape up well - Swedish (from Anders) and French (from somebody...not sure who yet...) will be great additions to.

Do we have any Italians on board? I have a friend who's an Italian teacher in the UK who might be prepared to do it if we can pay her for her time...

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