Jump to content
The Education Forum

Afghani Elections


Evan Burton
 Share

Recommended Posts

I don't see how we can support such a corrupt regime:

http://www.smh.com.au/world/karzai-steals-...91102-htfz.html

So what are the options?

Get out?

Remove the current government and conduct new elections?

Just accept the situation and try to work within it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see how we can support such a corrupt regime:

http://www.smh.com.au/world/karzai-steals-...91102-htfz.html

So what are the options?

Get out?

Remove the current government and conduct new elections?

Just accept the situation and try to work within it?

I fear that President Obama will find it difficult to withdraw his support for Hamid Karzai. Two factors made this a corrupt election: 1,500 ghost polling centres and corrupt election commission staff. The Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC) excluded enough phoney votes to reduce Karzai’s total to 49.67% to ensure a runoff with Abdullah Abdullah. If ECC did a full recount, Karzai’s total would have been substantially lower.

If the runoff election had removed the 1,500 ghost polling centres, Abdullah might well have won the election. However, Karzai refused to accept this and so Abdullah understandably withdrew from the contest. Therefore, allied soldiers will continue to die protecting a corrupt regime.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In an Australian policed sector, 43 people went into a polling station. At the end of the day, the votes were tallied... all 1500 of them.

We CANNOT support such corruption.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
I fear that President Obama will find it difficult to withdraw his support for Hamid Karzai. Two factors made this a corrupt election: 1,500 ghost polling centres and corrupt election commission staff. The Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC) excluded enough phoney votes to reduce Karzai’s total to 49.67% to ensure a runoff with Abdullah Abdullah. If ECC did a full recount, Karzai’s total would have been substantially lower.

If the runoff election had removed the 1,500 ghost polling centres, Abdullah might well have won the election. However, Karzai refused to accept this and so Abdullah understandably withdrew from the contest. Therefore, allied soldiers will continue to die protecting a corrupt regime.

Soldiers will continue to die protecting the subcontractors too. Smedley Butler put it about as succinctly as one can. This CNN article will surprise no one.

Congress to probe private military contractors in Afghanistan: http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/12/1...tractors.probe/

The United States government has reportedly spent 23 billion dollars on subcontractors since the invasion of Afghanistan occurred.

There are currently more contractors (104,000) than there will be American soldiers at the height of the coming surge.

It's obscene on many different levels.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...