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Suzanne Paylor


Suzanne Paylor
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Dr. Suzanne Paylor is the full-time researcher on the ncse project. Suzanne’s research interests include the history of popular print culture and lie, more specifically, in the history of science communication in popular media. Her doctoral research involved a systematic and extensive study of the content, production, authorship and readership of a wide variety of mid to late nineteenth century popular publications and explored the ways in which scientific knowledge, especially ‘Darwinian’ ideas, encountered in popular periodicals, books, pamphlets and other printed matter, functioned in a variety of social, recreational and educational settings. From 2002-2004 Suzanne worked at Leeds University on the Scientific Publishing and the Readership for Science Project; lectured on the history and philosophy of psychology and subsequently worked for the Leeds Electronic Text Centre. She is also involved in the development of the user interface of the British Library/JISC Archival Newspapers Project.

Recent and forthcoming publications include:

'Edward B. Aveling: The People’s Darwin' , Endeavour, 30 (2005).

'Scientific Publishing and the Readership for Science in the Early Nineteenth Century' , The Library, [forthcoming].

' Mapping the “Mighty Maze:” the Nineteenth-Century Serials Edition' , 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth –Century, [forthcoming]

Recent and forthcoming papers include:

'Ma®king the Text? The Nineteenth Century Serials Edition (ncse) and the role of humanities scholars in the digitisation of print archives' , Digital Resources in the Humanities, University of Lancaster, September 2005.

'Materials analysis and preliminary digitization, best practices in OCR, transcription, and imaging' , NINES, University of Virginia, July 2005.

'Sitting down for what you believe in: popular lectures and the audience experience' , British Society for the History of Science Annual Conference, University of Leeds, July 2005.

'Mapping the “Mighty Maze:” the Nineteenth-Century Serials Edition' , Nineteenth Century Studies Centre Seminar, University of London, May 2005.

'Communicating Popular Darwinism(s): Later Nineteenth Popularisers and Professionals in Print and in Practice'

Session—Public Science and Control of Information, Fifth British-North American Joint Meeting of the BSHS, CSHPS and HSS, Halifax Nova Scotia, August 2004.

'Aping the scientists: identity and the pursuit of scientific knowledge in lay encounters with Darwinism' , British Society for the History of Science Annual Conference, Liverpool Hope University College at Everton, Liverpool, June 2004.

'The Poor Man's Darwin: Edward B. Aveling and Popular Darwinism in Late Nineteenth Century England' , British Society for the History of Science Annual Conference, College of Ripon St. John, York, July 2003.

'Seeing is Believing: the Philosophy of Popular Science in the Late Nineteenth Century' , History and Philosophy of Science Seminar, University of Leeds, May 2003.

'Scientific Authority and the Democratic Intellect: Some Secularist Encounters with 'Darwinian' Ideas in the Late Nineteenth Century' , Wesley Centre, Oxford Brookes University, February 2003.

'Scientific Publishing and the Readership for Science in the Early Nineteenth Century' , History and Philosophy of Science Seminar, University of Leeds, February 2003.

'Content to Sport As An Ape' : Sydney H. Smith and the Popular Experience of the Darwinian 'Revolution', History and Philosophy of Science Senior Seminar, University of Leeds, May 2002.

'The Working Man Who Met Darwin and Survived: Redefining Boundaries of Participation in the Pursuit of Scientific Knowledge' , British Society for the History of Science Postgraduate Conference, Magdalen College, Oxford December 2001.

'Cat Torture, Rambling and Ironmongery: Science and Identity in Late Nineteenth Century York' , York Nineteenth Century Studies Group, University of York, November 2001.

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