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Misplaced Moon footage.


Guest Stephen Turner
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Guest Stephen Turner

From the BBC website.

" A search has begun to locate the original film footage of Mans first steps on the Moon. The tapes are believed to be stored somewhere in the archive at NASA's Goddard space flight center, Maryland. The TV footage seen by people around the World has been compared to a photocopy of a photocopy, the Astronauts actually beamed higher quality footage back to earth, seen by a small number of people at three tracking stations."

Perhaps if they can locate it, and if the quality is as good as they say it is, the Moon hoax might be resolved once and for all...Oh and BTW NASA, employ a decent professional archivist.

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From the BBC website.

" A search has begun to locate the original film footage of Mans first steps on the Moon. The tapes are believed to be stored somewhere in the archive at NASA's Goddard space flight center, Maryland. The TV footage seen by people around the World has been compared to a photocopy of a photocopy, the Astronauts actually beamed higher quality footage back to earth, seen by a small number of people at three tracking stations."

Perhaps if they can locate it, and if the quality is as good as they say it is, the Moon hoax might be resolved once and for all...Oh and BTW NASA, employ a decent professional archivist.

A better story here complete with images taken from the original downlink data...

http://www.honeysucklecreek.net/Apollo_11/..._SSTV_Tapes.pdf

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  • 2 weeks later...

From the above website:

12. Conclusion

Over the past few years, a search for the missing Apollo 11 SSTV tapes has been conducted by

several former Apollo 11 personnel. The purpose of the search is to recover the original high quality

TV of the first lunar EVA. To date, the tapes have not been found.

Remarkably, the Apollo 11 TV pictures watched live by the world were of poorer quality than those

actually received by the three tracking stations involved in their reception. The signal as sent from

the Moon was initially degraded by the scan-conversion process, producing lower resolution images

and introducing additional signal noise. There is also evidence that the transmission of the scanconverted

TV to Houston caused additional signal degradation. Sadly, it is this degraded TV that is

the only version currently available to the public and historians.

However, as has been demonstrated, the unconverted slow-scan TV, received directly from the

Moon, was of superior quality and resolution to the scan-converted images broadcast live to the

world. If the tapes could be located, then by using modern digital image processing techniques, it is

possible to recover the original high quality TV of the first lunar EVA and to make it available to

the public for the first time.

In July 1969, only a fortunate handful of people at the three tracking stations, and in Sydney,

viewed the moonwalk in its original, high quality format. With the renewed effort and interest in

returning to the Moon, we owe it to future generations to find the data tapes in order to witness the

first moonwalk as it was originally intended to be seen - with the greatest possible clarity.

The Apollo 11 mission represents a defining moment in human history. For the sake of posterity

and for the benefit of future generations, it is imperative that the search for the Apollo 11 magnetic

data tapes be more vigorously pursued so that the slow-scan TV can be restored to its original form

before the tapes deteriorate beyond repair.

Thanks to the efforts of a dedicated few former Apollo 11 personnel, working with limited

resources in the United States and Australia, the search for the Apollo 11 SSTV tapes continues. If

the full resources of NASA could be brought to bear on this enterprise, the fate and whereabouts of

the tapes can be very quickly determined. It is hoped that this report will contribute a little toward

this goal.

Where are the tapes?

John Sarkissian

CSIRO Parkes Observatory

21 May 2006.

John.Sarkissian@csiro.au

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  • 2 months later...

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