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Breaking News Subscribers" <BreakingNews@newsletters.dallasnews.com>

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Subject: DallasNews.com Breaking News Alert

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2008 03:28:01 -0500 (CDT)

Dallas police reported early Tuesday that two people had been found

fatally shot at the Red Bird-area home of former DART Board of Directors

chairwoman Lynn Flint Shaw and her husband, political analyst Rufus Shaw

Jr.

This happened near the Redbird sub division in Oak Cliff: Could this be the Rufus Shaw of the publishing company in Dallas?

D.A. Games? The Lynn Flint Shaw Arrest Files

Allen Gwinn 2008-02-15 16:02 City of Dallas

Mrs Shaw had recently been arrested in Dallas for forgery:

UPDATE 2/18/08: Dallas Morning News is asking questions too!

ANOTHER UPDATE: Date on arrest warrant affidavit is wrong!

Former DART Board Chair Lynn Flint Shaw was arrested earlier this week for allegedly forging a letter from Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins to keep from paying a debt.

The Texas Penal Code says about forgery that a "person commits an offense if he forges a writing with intent to defraud or harm another."

It goes on to say that to do so "is a felony of the third degree if the writing is or purports to be [...] part of an issue of money."

So our question is: why wasn't Lynn Flint Shaw charged with felony forgery?

Better yet, according to records obtained by Dallas.Org (links, below, in the story), why wasn't Shaw charged with a felony at all?

The saga began in early December when, according to the Affidavit for Arrest Warrant or Capias made by Dallas County DA's Investigator Barry Dyson, Shaw mailed an empty envelope to friend Tifany Cheatham, to get Cheatham to believe that Shaw's $3,500 check to her had been stolen in the mail.

On New Years Eve Shaw, according to Dyson, faxed a letter purporting to be from Watkins to Cheatham claiming that the matter was under investigation by the D.A.'s office.

According to Dyson when he examined the letter from Shaw he "recognized the signature on the document in question to be a forgery."

Instead of being charged with forgery, however, Shaw was arrested (Arrest Warrant) and booked on a much lesser misdemeanor charge of tampering with a governmental record.

Ironically, the Texas Penal Code says that tampering with a governmental record is "a felony of the second degree [...] if the actor's intent in committing the offense was to defraud or harm another."

One of Dallas.Org's attorneys questioned whether the letter from Watkins might not be able to be construed to be a "governmental record."

So will Shaw's lawyer simply have the charge thrown out--such that Watkins will have to re-file another charge against an old friend?

Better yet, will Shaw get off scott-free at some point down the road? And, since she wasn't charged with a felony or a "crime of moral turpitude" (theft, forgery, etc.), will her path shortly take her to another board or commission appointment?

Only time will tell.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Update: 2/18/08

Avi Adelman pointed out that the date on the 3rd paragraph of the Affidavit for Arrest Warrant or Capias is misdated. Instead of 2007, it says 2008. Perhaps this is nothing, in and of itself, but are all the little mistakes going to add up to a dismissal of the charges?

Also, the Dallas Morning News began asking questions about these issues in this morning's editorials noting that nobody from Shaw all the way to the D.A.'s office is talking.

The Morning News points out that a "memo agreement" is forthcoming. Unlike "deferred adjudication," it leaves no marks. Shaw must simply agree to be a good girl from now on and the charges disappear.

We can't help but wonder if this had happened to anyone else, would the D.A. be as "forgiving?"

Coul;d this be related to the recently released documents on the JFK? (speculations) However, documents were recently sent to Rufus Shaw for review.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE DALLAS D.A.'S ELECTION: Reference Rufus Shaw

http://www.amazon.com/Hustling-Art-Black-F...l/dp/0936436018

FWIW

DO YOU BELIEVE THEM :

The 2007 mayoral race will be the most expensive in our history. For the first time in mayoral history, several well financed candidates have employed a bevy of Black political talent to reach out to the African-American electorate. In addition, never before have so many candidates had pockets of influence throughout the city’s electorate. One would think with all of these factors coming into play in one election, excitement and controversy would be at a fever pitch. Instead, most political watchers are predicting a low to moderate voter turn-out. Could the reason be that the electorate simply does not believe in the candidates or their promises?

Mayor Laura Miller won two elections handily by being outspoken, controversial, and racially divisive. Most Black voters South of the Trinity hated her, while a majority of Anglo voters north of the Trinity loved her. In fact, Laura Miller was never a “safe” candidate that appeared managed by consultants. Contrast her vote getting excitement inducing approach to campaigning with this current crop of non- offensive mayoral candidates and one might understand why this mayoral campaign has all of the trappings of a love fest instead of a knock-down political fight for the future of Dallas.

All of the mayoral candidates appear so non-controversial that one has to wonder if they are really telling the truth. For example, every candidate vows to further enhance southern sector economic development in order to attract Black voters. In reality, only Don Hill and Ed Oakley can claim to have actually done something that Dallasites can see in the area of southern sector economic development. Tom Leppert has insisted that he has spent over a billion dollars with minority businesses when he was head of Turner Construction. But that figure has come under question so much that maybe Mr. Leppert needs to produce some names to back up his claim. Darrell Jordan has worked on the Cotton Bowl expansion well before he ever thought of running for mayor thus giving him some legitimate claim to have at least done something for southern sector economic development. Max Wells’ claim of having lived on both sides of the Trinity has no bearing on southern sector economic development and only highlights that despite his years of public service he has done little or nothing on the issue.

Everybody knows the mayor has no control over the DISD. But that has not stopped mayoral candidates from trying to impress voters with their plan for improving the DISD. Unfortunately, none of them have the political courage to tell voters the truth about the issue. The truth is until the Dallas electorate decides to wrestle control from the school board and give control of the school district to the mayor, any talk of the mayor improving public education in Dallas is just telling voters what they want to hear without really being able to do anything about the problem.

It seems that in their efforts to be as conciliatory as Mayor Miller was controversial, this mayoral field is losing the interest of the electorate. How else can you explain why such a diverse, well-financed field of candidates is failing to generate any voter excitement? In an effort to appeal to everybody, most of these candidates will find themselves never really exciting anybody.

To make my point I will close with this example. When they were questioned about the immigration issue, most of the mayoral candidates deferred to the federal government and lampooned Farmers Branch. Of course that was the non-controversial way of handling the issue. But with the federal government‘s obvious mishandling of the illegal immigration crisis, and cities all over America following the upcoming Farmers Branch vote, you would think that a candidate who wanted to seize the electorate’s attention might have been more adventurous and thus represented the views of the majority of the electorate who want to see something done other than what the federal government is doing with the illegal immigration issue. Once again, by playing it safe, none of them seized the moment which makes you wonder how they really feel about these issues. At least that is how I see it from South of the Trinity.

Posted on Friday, April 6, 2007 at 11:35AM by Scott Bennett in Rufus Shaw

DON WILLIAMS: FRIEND OR FOE IN DISTRICT 7?

The District 7 City Council race to replace City Councilman Leo Chaney, Jr. may be decided by a white businessman who is not even in the race. Business developer Don Williams’ controversial efforts to revitalize South Dallas by using eminent domain laws has ensnared City Council candidate, Rev. Donald Parish, Sr., a close associate of Mr. Williams, in a political fight that pits Mr. Williams against South Dallas residents and some of South Dallas’ most powerful community leaders. What is at issue here is whether or not Don Williams is trying to help himself or the Black community.

I was born and raised in South Dallas. For the last 40 years I have been hearing this urban myth that whites are trying to steal South Dallas from the Black community. Now a number of African-Americans will take issue with my characterization of white developers stealing South Dallas as an urban myth, but I seriously wonder if white businessmen are really trying to steal South Dallas, when are they going to steal it? In the last 40 years I have watched white developers turn former rural backwater towns like Frisco, Plano, and Lewisville into thriving suburbs. Yet, South Dallas remains virtually the same undeveloped area it was 40 years ago.

In comes Don Williams, who his supporters style as a savior for South Dallas. Mr. Williams created the Foundation For Community Empowerment in order to help jump start economic development in the South Dallas/Fair Park area. Because of his highly publicized efforts in the area, Mr. Williams is considered by many in the north Dallas business community to be the “go to guy” for anything having to do with development in South Dallas. But if the meeting at the Martin Luther King Community Center is an indicator, those who join Mr. Williams may find they will not be greeted as liberators but they might be considered racist land grabbers.

On Friday, March 23rd over 200 angry residents of South Dallas attended a community meeting where the Frazier Revitalization Inc., one of Don William’s organizations, tried to explain the eminent domain issues supported by Mr. Williams. Not only did the community not support the issue but State Senator Royce West hosted the meeting told me he will not be supporting the issue because of the community’s overwhelming rejection of the issue. So, how did north Dallas’ “go to guy” for developments in South Dallas get this one so wrong?

It is my contention that Don Williams does not know the intricacies of South Dallas politics near as much as he pretends. I don’t want to suggest that the politics of development in South Dallas is any more complicated then they are in north Dallas. For example, it is much more political to do developments in north Dallas because the north Dallas interest groups are so numerous and powerful. South Dallas does not have powerful home owners groups or wealthy residents who can hold up development projects. On closer inspection, one will find that property owners in South Dallas only want a fair price for their property just like property owners in north Dallas.

Meanwhile, Rev. Donald Parish, Sr. has been severely tainted by his association with Don Williams so much so that this recent eminent domain debacle may sink Rev. Parish’s chance to become the next District 7 city council person. State Representative Terri Hodge who represents South Dallas in the legislature and who was present at the Martin Luther King meeting was none to happy with this particular group who was supporting eminent domain for her district. And Ms. Hodge also happens to be a major political force in South Dallas.

As for the future of Don Williams in South Dallas, I believe it is shaky mainly because, fair or not, enough influential residents of South Dallas distrust Mr. Williams to the point that they consider him the embodiment of the urban myth of white men trying to steal South Dallas from the African-American community. At least that is how I see it from South of the Trinity.

Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 at 10:46AM by Scott Bennett in Rufus Shaw, J Don Williams

THE CITY COUNCIL RACES

All four African-American city council seats are up for grabs in the southern sector. Because of term limits, none of the incumbent Black council members can seek re-election. Of these four city council races, I have chosen to highlight 3 of them because I feel the races in District 5, 4, and 8 have the most interesting story lines.

The city council race in District 5, Mayoral candidate Don Hill’s council seat, has attracted 8 candidates but two candidates will provide all of the drama in this race. Former Planning Commission Chairwoman and Laura Miller’s chief Black advocate, Betty Culbreath, is facing off against the John Wiley Price group’s handpicked candidate Vonceil Hill. Ms. Culbreath is clearly the most qualified candidate in this race. Her resume as an activist, problem solver, and city hall insider is second to none. But Betty Culbreath has serious problems with the very Black electorate she seeks to represent. Over the last few years, Ms. Culbreath has been on the wrong side of 3 major issues that impacted the Black community. First, Ms. Culbreath’s staunch support of Mayor Laura Miller, who is hugely unpopular in the Black community, upset most African-Americans. Second, Ms. Culbreath’s support of the Blackwood Strong Mayor proposal that was soundly defeated city wide and especially in the Black community put her at odds with the Black electorate. And third, Ms. Culbreath has even questioned the merits of 14-1 even though the 14-1 concept is overwhelmingly supported by the Black community.

Oh, but Vonceil Hill has her share of problems as well. Let’s start with the fact that she will sink or swim based on the John Wiley Price group. Voters who dislike Mr. Price and his group, and there are many, will not care who Vonceil Hill really is. But who Vonceil Hill really is might create even more problems for Ms. Hill. Ms. Hill, who is an attorney and former municipal judge, has been dogged by rumors that she has a serious attitude problem that makes her almost impossible to work with. Former county employees remember her turbulent tenure as a county administrator where Ms. Hill’s inability to work with other administrators caused enough problems for her to leave that job. That same inability to work with her peers, which played out in dramatic fashion at city hall a few years back, also contributed to Ms. Hill no longer being a municipal judge for the city.

Less exciting is the District 4 race where front runner, Dwaine Caraway, maybe the only candidate who can win his race without a run-off. Mr. Caraway ran a strong second to incumbent Dr. Maxine Thornton-Reese in the last election. Mr. Caraway has been campaigning for this election ever since. His strongest opponent is former Park Board member and long time civic leader, Gloria Hogg. The charming Ms. Hogg, who many consider the Queen of Pleasant Grove, is supported by City Councilwoman Maxine Thornton-Reese. Ms. Hogg will need all of her considerable charm to make a race out of this contest. Many in the Black electorate admire and respect Gloria Hogg but they feel it is Dwaine Caraway’s time.

Tennell Atkins has pulled off a political coup in his effort to replace James Fantroy in District 8. Mr. Atkins, who has long been a confidant of both Al Lipscomb and James Fantroy, has gotten the endorsement of both legendary District 8 leaders. But not only does Mr. Atkins have Mr. Lipscomb’s and Mr. Fantroy’s endorsements, he also has key operatives from both Mr.Lipscomb’s and Mr. Fantroy’s political organizations working for his campaign. Mr. Atkins will be challenged by a host of other candidates but primarily by former Justice of the Peace, Charles Rose, who has strong ties in District 8. Right now Mr. Atkins’ organization and his own hard work make him the front runner in District 8.

Still the real excitement is the District 5 race. Betty Culbreath has to convince the voters in District 5 that her previous unpopular stances won’t prevent her from representing the interests of District 5 voters. She must also hope that the electorate will strongly consider her overwhelming advantage in experience. Ms. Culbreath does benefit from the fact she has been one of the very few Black political leaders who has stood up to the John Price group. At least that is how I see it from South of the Trinity.

Posted on Monday, March 26, 2007 at 09:54PM by Special to DallasBlog.com

WHEN YOU HAVE NO MARKERS

The worst kept secret in the mayor’s race is that former Mayor Ron Kirk is supporting Tom Leppert for mayor. Yet, Mr. Kirk has publicly uttered to some in the media that he is remaining neutral. I suspect that pressure from the John Price group who is supporting Max Wells, maybe the reason Mr. Kirk, never a brave political power, has played the flip flop game with his endorsement position. Then again, Mr. Kirk, who is also a wily political survivor, maybe questioning whether or not Mr.Leppert can deliver on his campaign promises to the Black community. Whatever the reason for Kirk’s reticence, one thing is certain: The Tom Leppert campaign has not been able to attract public endorsements from Black political power brokers in the southern sector thus highlighting what happens to a new political figure that has no markers to call in.

Senator Barack Obama is finding out just how important relationships are in the Black political community. Despite his media darling status, Senator Obama does not have the relationships with the Black electorate that the Clintons enjoy. Translated: Senator Obama has no markers to call. Besides being unknown to the Black electorate, Mr. Leppert has also not developed the kind of business and political relationships in the southern sector to ensure a base of solid support from the African-American political leadership.

As the business candidate, Tom Leppert has to prove that his relationship with some of the city’s leading Anglo business leaders will translate into opportunities for African-Americans. Historically, that has always been the way business leaders turned politicians were sold to the Black electorate. Unfortunately, history shows that the business leader types have not done enough to deliver the Black community from its dismal economic condition. The big question now is can Tom Leppert do what other business types have not been able to do.

The Black folks who have publicly signed on with Tom Leppert have little or no impact on the way Black voters will vote. Of his public supporters, only Rev. Freddie Haynes III can make significant impact on the Black electorate for Tom Leppert. This does not mean that Tom Leppert won’t attract a number of Black voters. The word on the street is that the Willis Johnson group, Leppert’s Black consultants, has gotten a number of Black political players to work behind the scenes on behalf of Tom Leppert. But in a crowded field where every candidate is pursuing the Black vote, is this enough?

Political relationships are based on what a politician has done for the African-American community. Not surprisingly, Don Hill trumps all of the mayoral candidates in that respect and as a result Mr. Hill has the largest and most potent group of powerful Black political supporters. Candidates from the business community must show what they have done for the Black community while they were in the private sector. Another bonus for business candidates is they can always trout out some of their major well-heeled supporters and highlight what these supporters have done in the Black community. However, it becomes problematic for a business candidate when neither he nor his supporters have done enough in the Black community to attract major political players to publicly endorse his candidacy.

Endorsements don’t win political contests. Votes do. But in the case of Tom Leppert who is running as a businessman with the compassion and connections to jump start Black economic development in the southern sector, to not have major political players lined to publicly support him suggests that not enough of them believe Mr. Leppert can deliver the goods. I believe Tom Leppert means what he is telling the Black community. However, I wonder if his backers in the business community, a group that has historically neglected the African-American community, really supports Tom Leppert’s vision for a more inclusive Dallas. At least that is how I see it from South of the Trinity.

Posted on Monday, March 19, 2007 at 09:18AM by Special to DallasBlog.com Moderate Or Militant

The North Dallas electorate will have an unprecedented opportunity to influence who will be in power in the southern sector because Black leaders, both moderates and militants, have lined up behind a number of mayoral candidates. To African-American political watchers, the North Dallas electorate will not only be voting for their mayoral candidate, they will also be voting for the African-American leaders who will ascend to power if their candidate wins. As a result, Anglo voters north of the Trinity can no longer complain too loudly about the state of Black leadership South of the Trinity for they will have a hand in choosing who in the Black community has the ear of the next mayor.

I hesitate to use the term militant or radical in a demeaning way because I am considered by many to be militant. Yet, I cannot find a better term that contrasts significantly with the term moderate. Three mayoral candidates boast a “who’s who” of the moderate and militant Black leadership. Max Wells has the most militant group. His supporters include but or not limited to: Commissioner John Wiley Price, activist Roy Williams, former city council members Diane Ragsdale, Al Lipscomb, and Don Hicks. Tom Leppert boasts a more moderate cast of backers. They include former Mayor Ron Kirk, former Dallas Chamber of Commerce Chairman Albert Black, and mega pastor Rev. Frederick Haynes III, who some might consider militant until he is compared to John Wiley Price. Don Hill’s moderate support includes State Senator Royce West, all of the current African-American city council members, real estate magnet and political power broker Al Herron, and long time moderate political power player, Fred Blair. All of these candidates have a number of supporters I have not mentioned. But the ones I have mentioned highlight the contrast in support for each candidate.

The most interesting endorsement dilemma belongs to Max Wells. Mr. Wells enjoys strong support from conservative Anglo voters in the north yet he has aligned himself with some of the most controversial and militant leaders in the Black political community. Mr. Lipscomb, Mr. Price, Mr. Williams, and Ms. Ragsdale can hardly be called darlings of the north Dallas electorate. Nor can Mr. Wells claim that you have to deal with this group if you intend to get the Black vote. So, how will north Dallas voters reconcile themselves to supporting Max Wells and empowering John Wiley Price and Roy Williams?

Mr. Leppert and Mr. Hill have moderate Black supporters who are probably more palatable to North Dallas voters. Of course, one has to wonder if north Dallas likes them does this mean that voters South of the Trinity will reject their candidates or in the case of Don Hill, his candidacy. Although they don’t get near as much publicity as their militant counterparts, the moderate wing of the African-American political community controls more votes then the militant wing. A close look at the politics of the current crop of Black elected officials in Dallas will show that only John Wiley Price can be characterized as a militant elected Black official.

When north Dallas voters go to the polls, they will not only be casting a vote for mayor, they will also be casting a vote for the style of Black leadership in the southern sector that will accompany the newly elected mayor to city hall. Don’t believe any mayoral candidate who implies he is just using his Black support to get elected but they won’t have any say in his administration. All of the Black leaders I have referenced in this column are seasoned political pros and they fully intend to have the ear of their candidate if he is elected mayor. At least that is how I see it from South of the Trinity.

Posted on Monday, March 12, 2007 at 09:46AM by Special to DallasBlog.com

Tosh:

The forgery error is easily correctable, or rather was. Probably just a typo. Hell I still put "07" on things. It would not get the case thrown out.

Now why they were murdered and what they were involved in with this DA is the real issue here. Is it the racial stuff? That is what the Dallas papers will say, but the timing is ....just one more odd coincidence. In a case where the "coincidences" are simply overwhelming. The press may even just say "ramdom murder". No way. This couple was too tied in with the DA. (And other things yet to be posted).

Too d*** strange.

Dawn

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Breaking News Subscribers" <BreakingNews@newsletters.dallasnews.com>

From: "Breaking News" <BreakingNews@dallasnews.com> Add Mobile Alert

Subject: DallasNews.com Breaking News Alert

Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2008 03:28:01 -0500 (CDT)

Dallas police reported early Tuesday that two people had been found

fatally shot at the Red Bird-area home of former DART Board of Directors

chairwoman Lynn Flint Shaw and her husband, political analyst Rufus Shaw

Jr.

This happened near the Redbird sub division in Oak Cliff: Could this be the Rufus Shaw of the publishing company in Dallas?

D.A. Games? The Lynn Flint Shaw Arrest Files

Allen Gwinn 2008-02-15 16:02 City of Dallas

Mrs Shaw had recently been arrested in Dallas for forgery:

UPDATE 2/18/08: Dallas Morning News is asking questions too!

ANOTHER UPDATE: Date on arrest warrant affidavit is wrong!

Former DART Board Chair Lynn Flint Shaw was arrested earlier this week for allegedly forging a letter from Dallas County District Attorney Craig Watkins to keep from paying a debt.

The Texas Penal Code says about forgery that a "person commits an offense if he forges a writing with intent to defraud or harm another."

It goes on to say that to do so "is a felony of the third degree if the writing is or purports to be [...] part of an issue of money."

So our question is: why wasn't Lynn Flint Shaw charged with felony forgery?

Better yet, according to records obtained by Dallas.Org (links, below, in the story), why wasn't Shaw charged with a felony at all?

The saga began in early December when, according to the Affidavit for Arrest Warrant or Capias made by Dallas County DA's Investigator Barry Dyson, Shaw mailed an empty envelope to friend Tifany Cheatham, to get Cheatham to believe that Shaw's $3,500 check to her had been stolen in the mail.

On New Years Eve Shaw, according to Dyson, faxed a letter purporting to be from Watkins to Cheatham claiming that the matter was under investigation by the D.A.'s office.

According to Dyson when he examined the letter from Shaw he "recognized the signature on the document in question to be a forgery."

Instead of being charged with forgery, however, Shaw was arrested (Arrest Warrant) and booked on a much lesser misdemeanor charge of tampering with a governmental record.

Ironically, the Texas Penal Code says that tampering with a governmental record is "a felony of the second degree [...] if the actor's intent in committing the offense was to defraud or harm another."

One of Dallas.Org's attorneys questioned whether the letter from Watkins might not be able to be construed to be a "governmental record."

So will Shaw's lawyer simply have the charge thrown out--such that Watkins will have to re-file another charge against an old friend?

Better yet, will Shaw get off scott-free at some point down the road? And, since she wasn't charged with a felony or a "crime of moral turpitude" (theft, forgery, etc.), will her path shortly take her to another board or commission appointment?

Only time will tell.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Update: 2/18/08

Avi Adelman pointed out that the date on the 3rd paragraph of the Affidavit for Arrest Warrant or Capias is misdated. Instead of 2007, it says 2008. Perhaps this is nothing, in and of itself, but are all the little mistakes going to add up to a dismissal of the charges?

Also, the Dallas Morning News began asking questions about these issues in this morning's editorials noting that nobody from Shaw all the way to the D.A.'s office is talking.

The Morning News points out that a "memo agreement" is forthcoming. Unlike "deferred adjudication," it leaves no marks. Shaw must simply agree to be a good girl from now on and the charges disappear.

We can't help but wonder if this had happened to anyone else, would the D.A. be as "forgiving?"

Coul;d this be related to the recently released documents on the JFK? (speculations) However, documents were recently sent to Rufus Shaw for review.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON THE DALLAS D.A.'S ELECTION: Reference Rufus Shaw

http://www.amazon.com/Hustling-Art-Black-F...l/dp/0936436018

FWIW

Posted on Monday, March 12, 2007 at 09:46AM by Special to DallasBlog.com

Tosh:

The forgery error is easily correctable, or rather was. Probably just a typo. Hell I still put "07" on things. It would not get the case thrown out.

Now why they were murdered and what they were involved in with this DA is the real issue here. Is it the racial stuff? That is what the Dallas papers will say, but the timing is ....just one more odd coincidence. In a case where the "coincidences" are simply overwhelming. The press may even just say "ramdom murder". No way. This couple was too tied in with the DA. (And other things yet to be posted).

Too d*** strange.

Dawn

Thanks Dawn: (information before the fact, if speculations prove correct)

Points and summation"

1. I made contact with the DA shortly after the information concerning the JFK releases.

2. Shortly after a series of conversations with the DA's Staff; in reference to the DPD's "Vault" and the DA's " Safe", and my statements of what I (speculated) was in the boxes..., all contact was broken by the DA's office.

3. I was contacted by Rufus publishing (Rufus Shaw) in reference to various documents I had attempted to discussed with the DA.

4. I forward information and some of the limited documentation to the address I was given by the publisher.

5. Within ten days, he and his wife are Dead.

6. Case ruled Susicide by Dallas cornor

Is there a connection to the documents and the information submitted to the DA? I do not know. However, I find it strange that the timing is such. Perhaps your right Dawn; its nothing more than a strange coincident. Perhaps just one more of many. However, if its not.... then this information is before the fact.... and not after. IMO, The DPD's "Vault" should be investigated as to what may be in there and too, perhaps what has been removed and hidden from the Dallas DA.

Desktop Radar

ANOTHER SUICIDE:

Two found fatally shot at former DART chairwoman's home

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dw...w.41fcc700.html

IRWIN THOMPSON/DMN

A Dallas police officer stands guard outside the home of political analyst Rufus Shaw Jr. and former DART chairwoman Lynn Flint Shaw early Tuesday morning. 8:24 AM CT Political analyst Rufus Shaw Jr. died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his Red Bird-area home where the body of a woman was also found, Dallas police said Tuesday. Mr. Shaw lived at the home with his wife Lynn Flint Shaw, who resigned from the DART board in January.

Video: Police investigate deaths

CASE CLOSED: Nothing to see here.

Ya sure! Just one more murder suicide. That tells me a LOT. Just a hunch but I call this a warning. Tooooo damn coincidental. I am surprised there is not more activity on this thread. Oh well I guess arguments over the authencity of the Zapruder film are way more important.

Dawn

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Lynn Flint Shaw was mentioned at the Dallas DA Press Conference.

And I put up a link to her case for those unfamiliar with local Dallas politics.

Now somone has posted that Lynn Flint Shaw was given access to the Dallas DA JFK records?

I find that hard to believe.

BK

Here's some links:

http://www.dart.org/about/board/boardbios/shaw.asp

http://www.tacadallas.com/pages/bottom/lynnflintshaw.html

http://www.kbmt12.com/news/state/16518101.html

http://www.star-telegram.com/crime_courts/story/523802.html

I'd also like a reference to the statement that

"Coul;d this be related to the recently released documents on the JFK? (speculations) However, documents were recently sent to Rufus Shaw for review."

I see now that it was WTP who sent the recently released documents on JFK to Shaw for review and not the Dallas DA safe records.

Tosh, could you give us some more background on how you came to share JFK records with Shaw?

Did Craig Watkins tell you to?

Thanks,

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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Same address as home where bodies found? 6600 Bradock Place? BK

http://goliCompany Profile

Updated: 07-DEC-07

Rufus Shaw Publishing

Private Company, Headquarters Location

6616 Braddock Pl., Dallas, TX, United States

(214)331-1925, (214)331-0482 fax,

Primary SIC: Book Publishing & Printing, Primary NAICS: Book Publishers

Description: Manufacturing: Publishes personal financial manuals for Black Americans. Reaches market through direct mail, trade sales, and telephone sales. Does not accept unsolicited manuscripts

ath.ecnext.com/coms2/product-compint-0000706917-page.html

Edited by William Kelly
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Lynn Flint Shaw was mentioned at the Dallas DA Press Conference.

And I put up a link to her case for those unfamiliar with local Dallas politics.

Now somone has posted that Lynn Flint Shaw was given access to the Dallas DA JFK records?

I find that hard to believe.

BK

BK:

In what capacity was she mentioned? I realize that a message was left saying "we'll be dead" but that does not prove he did it. It merely proves that there will be no investigation into their deaths. Pretty convenient. Odd that someone would kiill and commit suicide over a class A misdemeanor. Even if it reverted back to a felony (forgery) she could have gotten two years deferred adjudication, repaid any restitution, and after compliance with probation rules the case would be dismissed. Hardly something one dies over.

Dawn

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Lynn Flint Shaw was mentioned at the Dallas DA Press Conference.

And I put up a link to her case for those unfamiliar with local Dallas politics.

Now somone has posted that Lynn Flint Shaw was given access to the Dallas DA JFK records?

I find that hard to believe.

BK

BK:

In what capacity was she mentioned? I realize that a message was left saying "we'll be dead" but that does not prove he did it. It merely proves that there will be no investigation into their deaths. Pretty convenient. Odd that someone would kiill and commit suicide over a class A misdemeanor. Even if it reverted back to a felony (forgery) she could have gotten two years deferred adjudication, repaid any restitution, and after compliance with probation rules the case would be dismissed. Hardly something one dies over.

Dawn

I just went back and looked at the Da's transcript. Most interesting. The relevent portion is below:

Q30: In the interests of transparency, are you going to file a felony case against Lynn Flint Shaw?

CW: Hey, we're talking about Kennedy right now, we're not talking about that.

Q31: …real time?

CW: Yea, well that conversation is best left for another day. I'm here talking about the Kennedy assassination, not Lynn Flint Shaw.

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Lynn Flint Shaw was mentioned at the Dallas DA Press Conference.

And I put up a link to her case for those unfamiliar with local Dallas politics.

Now somone has posted that Lynn Flint Shaw was given access to the Dallas DA JFK records?

I find that hard to believe.

BK

BK:

In what capacity was she mentioned? I realize that a message was left saying "we'll be dead" but that does not prove he did it. It merely proves that there will be no investigation into their deaths. Pretty convenient. Odd that someone would kiill and commit suicide over a class A misdemeanor. Even if it reverted back to a felony (forgery) she could have gotten two years deferred adjudication, repaid any restitution, and after compliance with probation rules the case would be dismissed. Hardly something one dies over.

Dawn

Dawn,

Latest news I found:

12:50 PM CDT on Tuesday, March 11, 2008

By BRAD WATSON / WFAA-TV

Video

Brad Watson reports

March 12, 2008

STORY: Police seek motive in Shaw murder-suicide

View larger E-mail Clip More Video DALLAS — Rufus Shaw left a phone message with a friend before he killed his wife and then himself Monday evening.

State Sen. Royce West has been close to Shaw since they met in junior high school. The call he received on his voice mail around 6 p.m. may have been one of the final messages from Shaw or his wife, Lynn Flint Shaw, prior to their deaths.

A grieving Sen. West described Shaw's tone of voice on the message as one of a man who didn't sound self assured, as he usually was.

"He basically said that by the time I got the message, he'd be dead — they'd be dead," Sen. West said.

He said Shaw left instructions for West to assist his college-age son and to take care of the affairs of the family.

Sen. West said Shaw also left a cryptic clue about what happened: "His enemies would make sure that they were dead before the end of the day," Sen. West said, adding that he did not know who these "enemies" might be.

Sen. West said he learned of the deaths about 12:30 a.m. Tuesday, then remembered that Shaw had called earlier. Only then did he retrieve the message.

The senator declined to speculate about what may have prompted the tragic shootings; he said he is baffled just like everyone else.

Sen. West said he doesn't know whetehr Lynn Flint Shaw's recent legal problems could have been a factor.

Sen. West said he provided a copy of the voice mail message to police.

With deep regret, West said he should have returned Shaw's call immediately.

[/color]

"His enemies would make sure that they were dead before the end of the day". Yup, sounds just like a murder suicide to me.

Dawn

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Let me get this straight.

The new, liberal, black DA of Dallas lets off dozens of convicted criminals based on DNA data, has a friend who forges a letter from the DA to avoid a $7,500 debt, before the DA releases JFK assassination records compiled by former DA Henry Wade and kept secreted by subsequent DAs, and holds a press conference about the JFK records during which he puts off being questioned about his friend the forger, then the DA refers some of the incoming communications regarding the DAs JFK assassination records to the husband of the forger friend, and then the husband kills his wife and himself?

Is that what happened?

http://www.kvia.com/Global/story.asp?S=8002547&nav=AbC0

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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