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Six Mistakes Bugliosi makes regarding my book.


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I have decided to review Vincent Bugliosi's book "Reclaiming History" in reference

to the comments and criticism he makes towards "The Men on the Sixth Floor"

Please feel free to follow the following link to Amazon and comment on the article

or even vote on it. I also welcome your input on this forum.

Thanks,

Glen Sample

http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-content...mp;x=6&y=11

Six mistakes Bugliosi makes regarding my book.

April 13, 2009

A response By Glen Sample to Vincent Bugliosi's critique of "The Men on the Sixth Floor" contained in his Book "Reclaiming History."

Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History", a five pound monster of a book, is thought by many to be the nail in the coffin of conspiracy theorists. Indeed, his experience as a prosecutor has served him well in his response to some of the silly JFK assassination theories that have been forwarded over the decades. Like shooting fish in a barrel, Bugliosi takes them all on, dismissing them one after another. For this I applaud him.

I have a few problems, however, with the way he has described my research. Let me explain. I am the author of "The Men on the Sixth Floor", a book that Mr. Bugliosi describes as a "pathetic story" that no rational person would believe. Lets see.

The second paragraph contains the first annoying problem. He misnames my main character.

He calls Loy Factor "Lawrence Lloyd Factor, a Chickasaw Indian from Fillmore, Oklahoma.

Actually, Lawrence Loy Factor was his name. Now, this may seem a small point, but it was definitely a red flag for me, because after all, this is supposed to be the last word in the JFK case; the crushing blow to "conspiracy buffs" the world over. Lets not start the process by misnaming the story's main character.

The second bone I have to pick with Mr. Bugliosi is the liberty he takes in explaining the details of our book. For example in the same paragraph as the misnamed Loy Factor occurs, he says that Factor, for "some undisclosed reason" decided to tell his cellmate, Mark Collom, the "Whopper" of a story about his participation with the assassins of JFK.

Actually, the reason was disclosed.

Mark and Loy were both quarantined for a period of many weeks together in the prison hospital. Their friendship grew, and thus Loy's trust in Mark allowed him to disclose this secret that previously had only been revealed to Loy's deceased wife. Mark helped Loy by reading his trial transcripts and helping Loy with his case. Decades later, when Mark and I found Loy in rural Oklahoma, it was obvious that a bond still existed between the two men. Bugliosi strives to give the impression, that Factor was spinning this tale to anyone who would listen, when the opposite is true. Factor told no one else this story. Twenty years later, when Mark and I eventually found and interviewed him, he was afraid to talk and even refused further interviews. It was only through our patience, gentle coaxing and Loy's trust in his old friend, that he agreed to talk further.

Thirdly, a description of Loy Factor's initial introduction to Mac Wallace lacks integrity and is a thinly disguised arrogant barb, designed to malign Loy and his story. Mr. Bugliosi describes wrongly that Wallace approached Factor at the funeral of U.S. Senator Sam Rayburn's funeral and "asked about Loy's ability as a marksman." Factor, he says, responds by saying "it was right good." That is not what happened. Wallace introduced himself to Factor and the two men conversed for some time, until finally President Kennedy arrived by limousine. It was then that Loy made the observation that the president lacked security. Then the conversation turned to Loy's interest in guns and hunting. It was Loy who broached the subject of his ability as a marksman, not Mac Wallace. And Loy never responded by saying it was "right good."

Bugliosi then takes his fourth punch with a rather silly observation. In our acknowledgements, Mark and I express our thanks to the many researchers, writers and witnesses who have helped us along the way. We also thank our wives, who, as one can imagine, were inconvenienced by our long ordeal of travel, research, interviews, time and expense etc. in compiling the information for our story. "They not only allowed us our fantasy, but they encouraged it", is what we wrote. Mr. Bugliosi describes this as a "Freudian slip", saying that the statement actually meant that the authors didn't believe what they themselves were writing. I can assure you that the authors did believe their story. Hundreds of e-mails and letters from all over the world have voiced the same sentiment from others also. Actually "Reclaiming History" quotes Robin Ramsay's ("Who Shot JFK?) statement that the authors (Sample & Collom) have "solved the case".

The fifth misrepresentation that Mr. Bugliosi makes is concerning the murder trial of Mac Wallace in 1952. He writes:

(quote) "In 1952, he (Wallace) was convicted in Austin, Texas, of murdering a golf pro, John Douglas Kinser, who had been having an affair with Wallace's estranged wife. He received a five-year suspended prison sentence. The authors see the dark hand of LBJ in the very light sentence, since Wallace's lawyer, John Cofer, was one of LBJ's main lawyers in his successful post-election legal battle for the U.S Senate against former governor Coke Stevenson in 1948. How Cofer would have the power to bring about Wallace's light sentence, the authors don't say. In a 1986 interview with the Dallas Times Herald, D. L. Johnson, one of the jurors in the Kinser case, said that he was the only juror who favored an outright acquittal for Kinser and that he forced the guilty-with-a-suspended-sentence verdict by threatening to cause a hung jury if he didn't get his way." (end quote)

While most of the above quote is true, Bugliosi asserts that our "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" is a strange assumption on our part! Attorney Cofer was one of many players in this trial, tightly manipulated by Lyndon Johnson and his Texas connections. Bugliosi neglects to tell his readers that D.L. Johnson was the first cousin and good friend of Gus Lanier, who during the trial sat at the defense table of Wallace and his main lawyers. (Who also included another LBJ friend - Polk Shelton) He also leaves out an important snippet from an intelligence file included in our book:

(quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor")

"And apparently the Johnson influence went even deeper. In Wallace's Naval intelligence file, supplied to us, (dated 20 July, 1961) Johnson is alluded to as bribing Bob Long, the prosecuting attorney in the case. The following quote is from page 4 of the 19 page file, paragraph 10. The SUBJECT referred to is Malcolm Wallace:

"Billy Roy WILDER and Richard C. AVENT, both assistant district attorneys who assisted in the procurement of SUBJECT's file, added their comments concerning rumors which persisted at the time of SUBJECT's trial. WILDER alleged that Bob LONG, former district Attorney, was reported to have been the recipient of valuable property in the city of Austin as a result of his suppression of certain aspects involving political ramifications." (end quote)

Also William Barrett, the famous newspaper writer from Dallas, was convinced of LBJ's involvement in the Wallace murder trial. We report on this in our book:

(Quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor") I was able to contact Mr. Barrett when I returned from Dallas. He confirmed the above information, and told me without hesitation that in his own mind, he is absolutely sure, beyond doubt, that Malcolm Wallace had the help of Lyndon Johnson in his legal battle.

Much later, we found The Texas Observer article (Nov. 7, 1986) by Bill Adler, which added further support to a "fixed" jury in the Wallace case:

"Not long after the trial, several of the jurors telephoned Doug Kinser's parents to apologize for voting for a suspended sentence, but said they did so only because threats had been made against their families, according to Al Kinser, a nephew of Kinser's who along with his father, still runs the Pitch and Putt golf course." (end quote)

Mr. Bugliosi implies that anyone "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" in the murder trial of Mac Wallace is irrational. I disagree. In fact, the "dark hand of LBJ" can be seen in another murder - that of Henry Marshall.

And that was the sixth mistake that Mr. Bugliosi makes in reference to our book - that there is no credible evidence that Malcolm Wallace murdered Henry Marshall. But there is ample reason to believe that Wallace was the murderer. One very strong reason is found in chapter 13 in our book - The Estes Documents. Although Mr. Bugliosi valiantly tries to discredit the source of these letters to and from the U. S. Justice Department and Billie Sol Estes, the fact remains that in 1984 Billie Sol Estes names Malcolm Wallace as the killer. But prior to these letters, Estes appeared before a Robertson County Texas grand jury and testified under oath to the same thing. Below is a news story of the confession that Mr.Bugliosi for some reason left out:

(quote)

By David Hanners Staff writer of The News. Franklin, Texas -

"Convicted swindler Billie Sol Estes told a grand jury that Lyndon B. Johnson was one of four men who planned the 1961 murder of an agriculture official, three sources close to the grand jury said Thursday. The sources said Estes testified that the group feared the official would link Estes' illegal activities to Johnson.

Estes, who was given immunity from prosecution to testify before a Robertson County grand jury Tuesday, told grand jurors that Johnson felt pressure to silence Henry Harvey Marshall of Bryan, a regional U.S.... Department of Agriculture official in charge of the federal cotton allotment program, sources said....

The sources, who asked to remain anonymous because grand jury testimony is secret under state law, said Estes testified that he had attended at least three meetings with Johnson - two in Washington and one at the Driskill Hotel in Austin - during which they discussed the need to stop Marshall from disclosing Estes' fraudulent business dealings and his ties with Johnson.

Estes testified that he later balked at the idea of killing Marshall, according to sources. Marshall had resisted attempts to transfer him from Bryan to Agriculture Department headquarters in Washington in order to silence him. Sources said Estes' testimony implicated:

Johnson, who had just been elected vice president. Estes and his family have repeatedly said that Estes was a political ally of LBJ, and that Estes made repeated campaign contributions to LBJ's campaigns. Johnson assumed the presidency on the death of John F. Kennedy, on Nov. 22, 1963. He was elected in 1964 to a full term, but chose in 1968 not to seek re-election. He died at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas, on Jan. 22, 1973.

Clifton C. Carter, a close Johnson political aide and troubleshooter who later served as Executive Director and Treasurer of the Democratic National Committee. Carter died of natural causes in Arlington (Va.) Hospital Sept. 21, 1971.

Malcolm Everett (Mac) Wallace, the president of the 1945 student body at the University of Texas at Austin and a onetime U. S. Agriculture Department economist. Wallace, whom sources said Estes identified as Marshall's killer, previously had avoided a prison term on a 1952 murder conviction in Austin. Wallace died, sources said, in a Northeast Texas automobile accident in 1971.

A relative found Marshall's body June 3, 1961, on his Robertson County ranch. He had been shot five times, and his bolt-action .22 caliber rifle was found nearby. (NOT a shotgun as Bugliosi states) His death originally was ruled a suicide by a local justice of the peace, but the ruling came into question a year later when news broke of Marshall's investigation of Estes' cotton allotments.

U.S. Marshall Clint Peoples, who as a Texas Ranger captain began investigating the Murder in 1962, said Thursday that Marshall "was blowing the whistle" on Estes' scheme to defraud the government's cotton allotment program.

Peoples, who persuaded Estes to testify before the grand jury Tuesday, refused to name the people whom Estes implicated in the conspiracy.

"I asked him (Estes) why he didn't testify at the first grand jury in 1962, and he said if he had, he would have been a dead man," said John Paschall, the district attorney.

Paschall said records from the 1962 grand jury revealed that Marshall approved 138 cotton allotments for Estes from Jan. 17 to June 3, 1961. But, Peoples said, "The facts are that Henry Marshall was told to approve them (Estes' cotton allotments)." Before 1961, Estes, a Pecos millionaire who had made much of his money through federally subsidized farm programs, had become a key Democratic power broker and fund-raiser for the campaigns of Johnson, Yarborough and then-Gov. John Connally. Less than a year later, Estes' multi-million dollar empire - built on non-existent grain storage elevators and cotton allotments he obtained fraudulently - collapsed.

In March 1962, Estes was indicted on fraud charges. Two months later, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Orville Freeman said Marshall had been the only man who could provide some of the answers to questions about Estes' involvement in the cotton allotment program.

Days later, a state district judge in Bryan authorized the exhumation of Marshall's body. An autopsy by Harris County Medical Examiner Joseph Jachimczyk revealed that Marshall suffered not only five gunshot wounds to his lower left abdomen but also carbon monoxide poisoning and a head injury. The bruise to Marshall's head occurred before his death, Jachimczyk said, and would have been incapacitating."

Sybil Marshall, the wife of the slain Agriculture Department official, said Thursday, "I'm kind of shocked. I don't know what to think."

Mrs. Marshall said her family always believed her husband had been murdered. "I can't believe he would do that to himself (commit suicide), she said. "He was a good man."

Estes, despite two federal trials and subsequent prison terms in the following two decades, steadfastly had refused to discuss his relationship with Lyndon Johnson or the Marshall murder. Called to testify before a 1962 grand jury investigating Marshall's death, Estes repeatedly invoked his constitutional right against self-incrimination, according to press reports at the time.

"Daddy's silence... allowed Lyndon Johnson to become president," Estes' daughter, Pam Estes, wrote in a book about her father titled BILLIE SOL, which was released last week.

"During that time, Daddy had been supplying Lyndon Johnson with large infusions of cash, not only for his own political needs but for people Johnson himself chose to help.

"Sometimes Johnson would send people like Ralph Yarborough directly to Daddy for fund-raising help. On other occasions, Johnson would get bundles of cash from Daddy and distribute it himself. Since those transactions were all cash, there is no reliable way of knowing how much money went to Johnson or what became of it.

"Daddy has steadfastly refused to talk about that part of his life with anyone, even me," she wrote. Wallace, whom sources said Estes named as the triggerman in Marshall's murder, at one time had dated Johnson's sister, Josefa, according to a friend of the Johnson family who asked not to be identified. Johnson's sister died in 1961.

However, Horace Busby, a close friend of Johnson's, said Johnson met Wallace only once, when Carter brought Wallace to Johnson's home in Washington. Wallace was convicted in 1952 of killing John Douglas Kinser of Austin. Testimony in that case revealed that Kinser had been having an affair with Wallace's wife. Wallace was sentenced to a five-year prison term, which was suspended.

Wallace was represented in his 1952 trial by Austin criminal defense lawyer John Cofer, now deceased. Cofer, a longtime LBJ confidant, had represented Johnson in the Jim Wells County "Box 13" voter fraud case in 1948. Because of the slim edge of 87 votes he received from Box 13, Johnson won a runoff election against Coke Stevenson for the U.S. Senate.

Cofer defended Estes in his 1962 fraud trial. Ms. Estes said in her book that Cofer was hired "at the insistence of Lyndon Johnson."

Cofer rested Estes' case without calling any defense witnesses. "I feel that that was done to make sure there was no opportunity of implicating Lyndon Johnson during any testimony or cross examination," Ms. Estes wrote.

"It should be clear by now that it was Lyndon Johnson who paved the way for the preferential treatment Daddy received from the Agriculture Department," she wrote..."

(end quote)

There is more evidence that Malcolm Wallace was the murderer of Henry Marshall, but space on this venue does not allow for it.

These are six examples of how Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History" has distorted the facts of our book. It makes me wonder how many other distortions exist within his books pages.

Glen Sample

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An excellent post - however Glen, you would have been better smearing another member of this forum with absolute rubbish and nonsense, or babbling about where you think Mary Moorman was standing, if you really wanted to elucidate any kind of real interest and response here nowadays.

Keep up the good work! There are a few of us that think there is a lot of merit to the Loy Factor account, and your post had a lot of interesting and solid information contained in it.

- lee

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Guest Stephen Turner
An excellent post - however Glen, you would have been better smearing another member of this forum with absolute rubbish and nonsense, or babbling about where you think Mary Moorman was standing, if you really wanted to elucidate any kind of real interest and response here nowadays.

- lee

Lee, thats nailed it Brother. Glenn nice piece. About three years ago I did a similar deconstrution job on Posner, which is now a sticky in the index.

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Glen,

In your dealings with Factor, did he ever mention the name John Sawtooth?

Sawtooth was a Texan legend when it came to tracking and the like. He was the guide Paul Rothermel used when hunting. Rothermel was an expert marksman with many trophies for Boone and Crockett Club events.

Sawtooth and Factor were supposedly friends.

James

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I have decided to review Vincent Bugliosi's book "Reclaiming History" in reference

to the comments and criticism he makes towards "The Men on the Sixth Floor"

Please feel free to follow the following link to Amazon and comment on the article

or even vote on it. I also welcome your input on this forum.

Thanks,

Glen Sample

http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-content...mp;x=6&y=11

Six mistakes Bugliosi makes regarding my book.

April 13, 2009

A response By Glen Sample to Vincent Bugliosi's critique of "The Men on the Sixth Floor" contained in his Book "Reclaiming History."

Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History", a five pound monster of a book, is thought by many to be the nail in the coffin of conspiracy theorists. Indeed, his experience as a prosecutor has served him well in his response to some of the silly JFK assassination theories that have been forwarded over the decades. Like shooting fish in a barrel, Bugliosi takes them all on, dismissing them one after another. For this I applaud him.

I have a few problems, however, with the way he has described my research. Let me explain. I am the author of "The Men on the Sixth Floor", a book that Mr. Bugliosi describes as a "pathetic story" that no rational person would believe. Lets see.

The second paragraph contains the first annoying problem. He misnames my main character.

He calls Loy Factor "Lawrence Lloyd Factor, a Chickasaw Indian from Fillmore, Oklahoma.

Actually, Lawrence Loy Factor was his name. Now, this may seem a small point, but it was definitely a red flag for me, because after all, this is supposed to be the last word in the JFK case; the crushing blow to "conspiracy buffs" the world over. Lets not start the process by misnaming the story's main character.

The second bone I have to pick with Mr. Bugliosi is the liberty he takes in explaining the details of our book. For example in the same paragraph as the misnamed Loy Factor occurs, he says that Factor, for "some undisclosed reason" decided to tell his cellmate, Mark Collom, the "Whopper" of a story about his participation with the assassins of JFK.

Actually, the reason was disclosed.

Mark and Loy were both quarantined for a period of many weeks together in the prison hospital. Their friendship grew, and thus Loy's trust in Mark allowed him to disclose this secret that previously had only been revealed to Loy's deceased wife. Mark helped Loy by reading his trial transcripts and helping Loy with his case. Decades later, when Mark and I found Loy in rural Oklahoma, it was obvious that a bond still existed between the two men. Bugliosi strives to give the impression, that Factor was spinning this tale to anyone who would listen, when the opposite is true. Factor told no one else this story. Twenty years later, when Mark and I eventually found and interviewed him, he was afraid to talk and even refused further interviews. It was only through our patience, gentle coaxing and Loy's trust in his old friend, that he agreed to talk further.

Thirdly, a description of Loy Factor's initial introduction to Mac Wallace lacks integrity and is a thinly disguised arrogant barb, designed to malign Loy and his story. Mr. Bugliosi describes wrongly that Wallace approached Factor at the funeral of U.S. Senator Sam Rayburn's funeral and "asked about Loy's ability as a marksman." Factor, he says, responds by saying "it was right good." That is not what happened. Wallace introduced himself to Factor and the two men conversed for some time, until finally President Kennedy arrived by limousine. It was then that Loy made the observation that the president lacked security. Then the conversation turned to Loy's interest in guns and hunting. It was Loy who broached the subject of his ability as a marksman, not Mac Wallace. And Loy never responded by saying it was "right good."

Bugliosi then takes his fourth punch with a rather silly observation. In our acknowledgements, Mark and I express our thanks to the many researchers, writers and witnesses who have helped us along the way. We also thank our wives, who, as one can imagine, were inconvenienced by our long ordeal of travel, research, interviews, time and expense etc. in compiling the information for our story. "They not only allowed us our fantasy, but they encouraged it", is what we wrote. Mr. Bugliosi describes this as a "Freudian slip", saying that the statement actually meant that the authors didn't believe what they themselves were writing. I can assure you that the authors did believe their story. Hundreds of e-mails and letters from all over the world have voiced the same sentiment from others also. Actually "Reclaiming History" quotes Robin Ramsay's ("Who Shot JFK?) statement that the authors (Sample & Collom) have "solved the case".

The fifth misrepresentation that Mr. Bugliosi makes is concerning the murder trial of Mac Wallace in 1952. He writes:

(quote) "In 1952, he (Wallace) was convicted in Austin, Texas, of murdering a golf pro, John Douglas Kinser, who had been having an affair with Wallace's estranged wife. He received a five-year suspended prison sentence. The authors see the dark hand of LBJ in the very light sentence, since Wallace's lawyer, John Cofer, was one of LBJ's main lawyers in his successful post-election legal battle for the U.S Senate against former governor Coke Stevenson in 1948. How Cofer would have the power to bring about Wallace's light sentence, the authors don't say. In a 1986 interview with the Dallas Times Herald, D. L. Johnson, one of the jurors in the Kinser case, said that he was the only juror who favored an outright acquittal for Kinser and that he forced the guilty-with-a-suspended-sentence verdict by threatening to cause a hung jury if he didn't get his way." (end quote)

While most of the above quote is true, Bugliosi asserts that our "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" is a strange assumption on our part! Attorney Cofer was one of many players in this trial, tightly manipulated by Lyndon Johnson and his Texas connections. Bugliosi neglects to tell his readers that D.L. Johnson was the first cousin and good friend of Gus Lanier, who during the trial sat at the defense table of Wallace and his main lawyers. (Who also included another LBJ friend - Polk Shelton) He also leaves out an important snippet from an intelligence file included in our book:

(quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor")

"And apparently the Johnson influence went even deeper. In Wallace's Naval intelligence file, supplied to us, (dated 20 July, 1961) Johnson is alluded to as bribing Bob Long, the prosecuting attorney in the case. The following quote is from page 4 of the 19 page file, paragraph 10. The SUBJECT referred to is Malcolm Wallace:

"Billy Roy WILDER and Richard C. AVENT, both assistant district attorneys who assisted in the procurement of SUBJECT's file, added their comments concerning rumors which persisted at the time of SUBJECT's trial. WILDER alleged that Bob LONG, former district Attorney, was reported to have been the recipient of valuable property in the city of Austin as a result of his suppression of certain aspects involving political ramifications." (end quote)

Also William Barrett, the famous newspaper writer from Dallas, was convinced of LBJ's involvement in the Wallace murder trial. We report on this in our book:

(Quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor") I was able to contact Mr. Barrett when I returned from Dallas. He confirmed the above information, and told me without hesitation that in his own mind, he is absolutely sure, beyond doubt, that Malcolm Wallace had the help of Lyndon Johnson in his legal battle.

Much later, we found The Texas Observer article (Nov. 7, 1986) by Bill Adler, which added further support to a "fixed" jury in the Wallace case:

"Not long after the trial, several of the jurors telephoned Doug Kinser's parents to apologize for voting for a suspended sentence, but said they did so only because threats had been made against their families, according to Al Kinser, a nephew of Kinser's who along with his father, still runs the Pitch and Putt golf course." (end quote)

Mr. Bugliosi implies that anyone "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" in the murder trial of Mac Wallace is irrational. I disagree. In fact, the "dark hand of LBJ" can be seen in another murder - that of Henry Marshall.

And that was the sixth mistake that Mr. Bugliosi makes in reference to our book - that there is no credible evidence that Malcolm Wallace murdered Henry Marshall. But there is ample reason to believe that Wallace was the murderer. One very strong reason is found in chapter 13 in our book - The Estes Documents. Although Mr. Bugliosi valiantly tries to discredit the source of these letters to and from the U. S. Justice Department and Billie Sol Estes, the fact remains that in 1984 Billie Sol Estes names Malcolm Wallace as the killer. But prior to these letters, Estes appeared before a Robertson County Texas grand jury and testified under oath to the same thing. Below is a news story of the confession that Mr.Bugliosi for some reason left out:

(quote)

By David Hanners Staff writer of The News. Franklin, Texas -

"Convicted swindler Billie Sol Estes told a grand jury that Lyndon B. Johnson was one of four men who planned the 1961 murder of an agriculture official, three sources close to the grand jury said Thursday. The sources said Estes testified that the group feared the official would link Estes' illegal activities to Johnson.

Estes, who was given immunity from prosecution to testify before a Robertson County grand jury Tuesday, told grand jurors that Johnson felt pressure to silence Henry Harvey Marshall of Bryan, a regional U.S.... Department of Agriculture official in charge of the federal cotton allotment program, sources said....

The sources, who asked to remain anonymous because grand jury testimony is secret under state law, said Estes testified that he had attended at least three meetings with Johnson - two in Washington and one at the Driskill Hotel in Austin - during which they discussed the need to stop Marshall from disclosing Estes' fraudulent business dealings and his ties with Johnson.

Estes testified that he later balked at the idea of killing Marshall, according to sources. Marshall had resisted attempts to transfer him from Bryan to Agriculture Department headquarters in Washington in order to silence him. Sources said Estes' testimony implicated:

Johnson, who had just been elected vice president. Estes and his family have repeatedly said that Estes was a political ally of LBJ, and that Estes made repeated campaign contributions to LBJ's campaigns. Johnson assumed the presidency on the death of John F. Kennedy, on Nov. 22, 1963. He was elected in 1964 to a full term, but chose in 1968 not to seek re-election. He died at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas, on Jan. 22, 1973.

Clifton C. Carter, a close Johnson political aide and troubleshooter who later served as Executive Director and Treasurer of the Democratic National Committee. Carter died of natural causes in Arlington (Va.) Hospital Sept. 21, 1971.

Malcolm Everett (Mac) Wallace, the president of the 1945 student body at the University of Texas at Austin and a onetime U. S. Agriculture Department economist. Wallace, whom sources said Estes identified as Marshall's killer, previously had avoided a prison term on a 1952 murder conviction in Austin. Wallace died, sources said, in a Northeast Texas automobile accident in 1971.

A relative found Marshall's body June 3, 1961, on his Robertson County ranch. He had been shot five times, and his bolt-action .22 caliber rifle was found nearby. (NOT a shotgun as Bugliosi states) His death originally was ruled a suicide by a local justice of the peace, but the ruling came into question a year later when news broke of Marshall's investigation of Estes' cotton allotments.

U.S. Marshall Clint Peoples, who as a Texas Ranger captain began investigating the Murder in 1962, said Thursday that Marshall "was blowing the whistle" on Estes' scheme to defraud the government's cotton allotment program.

Peoples, who persuaded Estes to testify before the grand jury Tuesday, refused to name the people whom Estes implicated in the conspiracy.

"I asked him (Estes) why he didn't testify at the first grand jury in 1962, and he said if he had, he would have been a dead man," said John Paschall, the district attorney.

Paschall said records from the 1962 grand jury revealed that Marshall approved 138 cotton allotments for Estes from Jan. 17 to June 3, 1961. But, Peoples said, "The facts are that Henry Marshall was told to approve them (Estes' cotton allotments)." Before 1961, Estes, a Pecos millionaire who had made much of his money through federally subsidized farm programs, had become a key Democratic power broker and fund-raiser for the campaigns of Johnson, Yarborough and then-Gov. John Connally. Less than a year later, Estes' multi-million dollar empire - built on non-existent grain storage elevators and cotton allotments he obtained fraudulently - collapsed.

In March 1962, Estes was indicted on fraud charges. Two months later, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Orville Freeman said Marshall had been the only man who could provide some of the answers to questions about Estes' involvement in the cotton allotment program.

Days later, a state district judge in Bryan authorized the exhumation of Marshall's body. An autopsy by Harris County Medical Examiner Joseph Jachimczyk revealed that Marshall suffered not only five gunshot wounds to his lower left abdomen but also carbon monoxide poisoning and a head injury. The bruise to Marshall's head occurred before his death, Jachimczyk said, and would have been incapacitating."

Sybil Marshall, the wife of the slain Agriculture Department official, said Thursday, "I'm kind of shocked. I don't know what to think."

Mrs. Marshall said her family always believed her husband had been murdered. "I can't believe he would do that to himself (commit suicide), she said. "He was a good man."

Estes, despite two federal trials and subsequent prison terms in the following two decades, steadfastly had refused to discuss his relationship with Lyndon Johnson or the Marshall murder. Called to testify before a 1962 grand jury investigating Marshall's death, Estes repeatedly invoked his constitutional right against self-incrimination, according to press reports at the time.

"Daddy's silence... allowed Lyndon Johnson to become president," Estes' daughter, Pam Estes, wrote in a book about her father titled BILLIE SOL, which was released last week.

"During that time, Daddy had been supplying Lyndon Johnson with large infusions of cash, not only for his own political needs but for people Johnson himself chose to help.

"Sometimes Johnson would send people like Ralph Yarborough directly to Daddy for fund-raising help. On other occasions, Johnson would get bundles of cash from Daddy and distribute it himself. Since those transactions were all cash, there is no reliable way of knowing how much money went to Johnson or what became of it.

"Daddy has steadfastly refused to talk about that part of his life with anyone, even me," she wrote. Wallace, whom sources said Estes named as the triggerman in Marshall's murder, at one time had dated Johnson's sister, Josefa, according to a friend of the Johnson family who asked not to be identified. Johnson's sister died in 1961.

However, Horace Busby, a close friend of Johnson's, said Johnson met Wallace only once, when Carter brought Wallace to Johnson's home in Washington. Wallace was convicted in 1952 of killing John Douglas Kinser of Austin. Testimony in that case revealed that Kinser had been having an affair with Wallace's wife. Wallace was sentenced to a five-year prison term, which was suspended.

Wallace was represented in his 1952 trial by Austin criminal defense lawyer John Cofer, now deceased. Cofer, a longtime LBJ confidant, had represented Johnson in the Jim Wells County "Box 13" voter fraud case in 1948. Because of the slim edge of 87 votes he received from Box 13, Johnson won a runoff election against Coke Stevenson for the U.S. Senate.

Cofer defended Estes in his 1962 fraud trial. Ms. Estes said in her book that Cofer was hired "at the insistence of Lyndon Johnson."

Cofer rested Estes' case without calling any defense witnesses. "I feel that that was done to make sure there was no opportunity of implicating Lyndon Johnson during any testimony or cross examination," Ms. Estes wrote.

"It should be clear by now that it was Lyndon Johnson who paved the way for the preferential treatment Daddy received from the Agriculture Department," she wrote..."

(end quote)

There is more evidence that Malcolm Wallace was the murderer of Henry Marshall, but space on this venue does not allow for it.

These are six examples of how Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History" has distorted the facts of our book. It makes me wonder how many other distortions exist within his books pages.

Glen Sample

I will add some of this information on my page on Loy Factor:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKfactor.htm

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Glen,

In your dealings with Factor, did he ever mention the name John Sawtooth?

Sawtooth was a Texan legend when it came to tracking and the like. He was the guide Paul Rothermel used when hunting. Rothermel was an expert marksman with many trophies for Boone and Crockett Club events.

Sawtooth and Factor were supposedly friends.

James

James,

No mention of John Sawtooth was made by Loy. It appears to me they were in

vastly different leagues....

Glen

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I have decided to review Vincent Bugliosi's book "Reclaiming History" in reference

to the comments and criticism he makes towards "The Men on the Sixth Floor"

Please feel free to follow the following link to Amazon and comment on the article

or even vote on it. I also welcome your input on this forum.

Thanks,

Glen Sample

http://www.amazon.com/gp/community-content...mp;x=6&y=11

Six mistakes Bugliosi makes regarding my book.

April 13, 2009

A response By Glen Sample to Vincent Bugliosi's critique of "The Men on the Sixth Floor" contained in his Book "Reclaiming History."

Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History", a five pound monster of a book, is thought by many to be the nail in the coffin of conspiracy theorists. Indeed, his experience as a prosecutor has served him well in his response to some of the silly JFK assassination theories that have been forwarded over the decades. Like shooting fish in a barrel, Bugliosi takes them all on, dismissing them one after another. For this I applaud him.

I have a few problems, however, with the way he has described my research. Let me explain. I am the author of "The Men on the Sixth Floor", a book that Mr. Bugliosi describes as a "pathetic story" that no rational person would believe. Lets see.

The second paragraph contains the first annoying problem. He misnames my main character.

He calls Loy Factor "Lawrence Lloyd Factor, a Chickasaw Indian from Fillmore, Oklahoma.

Actually, Lawrence Loy Factor was his name. Now, this may seem a small point, but it was definitely a red flag for me, because after all, this is supposed to be the last word in the JFK case; the crushing blow to "conspiracy buffs" the world over. Lets not start the process by misnaming the story's main character.

The second bone I have to pick with Mr. Bugliosi is the liberty he takes in explaining the details of our book. For example in the same paragraph as the misnamed Loy Factor occurs, he says that Factor, for "some undisclosed reason" decided to tell his cellmate, Mark Collom, the "Whopper" of a story about his participation with the assassins of JFK.

Actually, the reason was disclosed.

Mark and Loy were both quarantined for a period of many weeks together in the prison hospital. Their friendship grew, and thus Loy's trust in Mark allowed him to disclose this secret that previously had only been revealed to Loy's deceased wife. Mark helped Loy by reading his trial transcripts and helping Loy with his case. Decades later, when Mark and I found Loy in rural Oklahoma, it was obvious that a bond still existed between the two men. Bugliosi strives to give the impression, that Factor was spinning this tale to anyone who would listen, when the opposite is true. Factor told no one else this story. Twenty years later, when Mark and I eventually found and interviewed him, he was afraid to talk and even refused further interviews. It was only through our patience, gentle coaxing and Loy's trust in his old friend, that he agreed to talk further.

Thirdly, a description of Loy Factor's initial introduction to Mac Wallace lacks integrity and is a thinly disguised arrogant barb, designed to malign Loy and his story. Mr. Bugliosi describes wrongly that Wallace approached Factor at the funeral of U.S. Senator Sam Rayburn's funeral and "asked about Loy's ability as a marksman." Factor, he says, responds by saying "it was right good." That is not what happened. Wallace introduced himself to Factor and the two men conversed for some time, until finally President Kennedy arrived by limousine. It was then that Loy made the observation that the president lacked security. Then the conversation turned to Loy's interest in guns and hunting. It was Loy who broached the subject of his ability as a marksman, not Mac Wallace. And Loy never responded by saying it was "right good."

Bugliosi then takes his fourth punch with a rather silly observation. In our acknowledgements, Mark and I express our thanks to the many researchers, writers and witnesses who have helped us along the way. We also thank our wives, who, as one can imagine, were inconvenienced by our long ordeal of travel, research, interviews, time and expense etc. in compiling the information for our story. "They not only allowed us our fantasy, but they encouraged it", is what we wrote. Mr. Bugliosi describes this as a "Freudian slip", saying that the statement actually meant that the authors didn't believe what they themselves were writing. I can assure you that the authors did believe their story. Hundreds of e-mails and letters from all over the world have voiced the same sentiment from others also. Actually "Reclaiming History" quotes Robin Ramsay's ("Who Shot JFK?) statement that the authors (Sample & Collom) have "solved the case".

The fifth misrepresentation that Mr. Bugliosi makes is concerning the murder trial of Mac Wallace in 1952. He writes:

(quote) "In 1952, he (Wallace) was convicted in Austin, Texas, of murdering a golf pro, John Douglas Kinser, who had been having an affair with Wallace's estranged wife. He received a five-year suspended prison sentence. The authors see the dark hand of LBJ in the very light sentence, since Wallace's lawyer, John Cofer, was one of LBJ's main lawyers in his successful post-election legal battle for the U.S Senate against former governor Coke Stevenson in 1948. How Cofer would have the power to bring about Wallace's light sentence, the authors don't say. In a 1986 interview with the Dallas Times Herald, D. L. Johnson, one of the jurors in the Kinser case, said that he was the only juror who favored an outright acquittal for Kinser and that he forced the guilty-with-a-suspended-sentence verdict by threatening to cause a hung jury if he didn't get his way." (end quote)

While most of the above quote is true, Bugliosi asserts that our "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" is a strange assumption on our part! Attorney Cofer was one of many players in this trial, tightly manipulated by Lyndon Johnson and his Texas connections. Bugliosi neglects to tell his readers that D.L. Johnson was the first cousin and good friend of Gus Lanier, who during the trial sat at the defense table of Wallace and his main lawyers. (Who also included another LBJ friend - Polk Shelton) He also leaves out an important snippet from an intelligence file included in our book:

(quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor")

"And apparently the Johnson influence went even deeper. In Wallace's Naval intelligence file, supplied to us, (dated 20 July, 1961) Johnson is alluded to as bribing Bob Long, the prosecuting attorney in the case. The following quote is from page 4 of the 19 page file, paragraph 10. The SUBJECT referred to is Malcolm Wallace:

"Billy Roy WILDER and Richard C. AVENT, both assistant district attorneys who assisted in the procurement of SUBJECT's file, added their comments concerning rumors which persisted at the time of SUBJECT's trial. WILDER alleged that Bob LONG, former district Attorney, was reported to have been the recipient of valuable property in the city of Austin as a result of his suppression of certain aspects involving political ramifications." (end quote)

Also William Barrett, the famous newspaper writer from Dallas, was convinced of LBJ's involvement in the Wallace murder trial. We report on this in our book:

(Quote from "The Men on the Sixth Floor") I was able to contact Mr. Barrett when I returned from Dallas. He confirmed the above information, and told me without hesitation that in his own mind, he is absolutely sure, beyond doubt, that Malcolm Wallace had the help of Lyndon Johnson in his legal battle.

Much later, we found The Texas Observer article (Nov. 7, 1986) by Bill Adler, which added further support to a "fixed" jury in the Wallace case:

"Not long after the trial, several of the jurors telephoned Doug Kinser's parents to apologize for voting for a suspended sentence, but said they did so only because threats had been made against their families, according to Al Kinser, a nephew of Kinser's who along with his father, still runs the Pitch and Putt golf course." (end quote)

Mr. Bugliosi implies that anyone "seeing the dark hand of LBJ" in the murder trial of Mac Wallace is irrational. I disagree. In fact, the "dark hand of LBJ" can be seen in another murder - that of Henry Marshall.

And that was the sixth mistake that Mr. Bugliosi makes in reference to our book - that there is no credible evidence that Malcolm Wallace murdered Henry Marshall. But there is ample reason to believe that Wallace was the murderer. One very strong reason is found in chapter 13 in our book - The Estes Documents. Although Mr. Bugliosi valiantly tries to discredit the source of these letters to and from the U. S. Justice Department and Billie Sol Estes, the fact remains that in 1984 Billie Sol Estes names Malcolm Wallace as the killer. But prior to these letters, Estes appeared before a Robertson County Texas grand jury and testified under oath to the same thing. Below is a news story of the confession that Mr.Bugliosi for some reason left out:

(quote)

By David Hanners Staff writer of The News. Franklin, Texas -

"Convicted swindler Billie Sol Estes told a grand jury that Lyndon B. Johnson was one of four men who planned the 1961 murder of an agriculture official, three sources close to the grand jury said Thursday. The sources said Estes testified that the group feared the official would link Estes' illegal activities to Johnson.

Estes, who was given immunity from prosecution to testify before a Robertson County grand jury Tuesday, told grand jurors that Johnson felt pressure to silence Henry Harvey Marshall of Bryan, a regional U.S.... Department of Agriculture official in charge of the federal cotton allotment program, sources said....

The sources, who asked to remain anonymous because grand jury testimony is secret under state law, said Estes testified that he had attended at least three meetings with Johnson - two in Washington and one at the Driskill Hotel in Austin - during which they discussed the need to stop Marshall from disclosing Estes' fraudulent business dealings and his ties with Johnson.

Estes testified that he later balked at the idea of killing Marshall, according to sources. Marshall had resisted attempts to transfer him from Bryan to Agriculture Department headquarters in Washington in order to silence him. Sources said Estes' testimony implicated:

Johnson, who had just been elected vice president. Estes and his family have repeatedly said that Estes was a political ally of LBJ, and that Estes made repeated campaign contributions to LBJ's campaigns. Johnson assumed the presidency on the death of John F. Kennedy, on Nov. 22, 1963. He was elected in 1964 to a full term, but chose in 1968 not to seek re-election. He died at his ranch in Stonewall, Texas, on Jan. 22, 1973.

Clifton C. Carter, a close Johnson political aide and troubleshooter who later served as Executive Director and Treasurer of the Democratic National Committee. Carter died of natural causes in Arlington (Va.) Hospital Sept. 21, 1971.

Malcolm Everett (Mac) Wallace, the president of the 1945 student body at the University of Texas at Austin and a onetime U. S. Agriculture Department economist. Wallace, whom sources said Estes identified as Marshall's killer, previously had avoided a prison term on a 1952 murder conviction in Austin. Wallace died, sources said, in a Northeast Texas automobile accident in 1971.

A relative found Marshall's body June 3, 1961, on his Robertson County ranch. He had been shot five times, and his bolt-action .22 caliber rifle was found nearby. (NOT a shotgun as Bugliosi states) His death originally was ruled a suicide by a local justice of the peace, but the ruling came into question a year later when news broke of Marshall's investigation of Estes' cotton allotments.

U.S. Marshall Clint Peoples, who as a Texas Ranger captain began investigating the Murder in 1962, said Thursday that Marshall "was blowing the whistle" on Estes' scheme to defraud the government's cotton allotment program.

Peoples, who persuaded Estes to testify before the grand jury Tuesday, refused to name the people whom Estes implicated in the conspiracy.

"I asked him (Estes) why he didn't testify at the first grand jury in 1962, and he said if he had, he would have been a dead man," said John Paschall, the district attorney.

Paschall said records from the 1962 grand jury revealed that Marshall approved 138 cotton allotments for Estes from Jan. 17 to June 3, 1961. But, Peoples said, "The facts are that Henry Marshall was told to approve them (Estes' cotton allotments)." Before 1961, Estes, a Pecos millionaire who had made much of his money through federally subsidized farm programs, had become a key Democratic power broker and fund-raiser for the campaigns of Johnson, Yarborough and then-Gov. John Connally. Less than a year later, Estes' multi-million dollar empire - built on non-existent grain storage elevators and cotton allotments he obtained fraudulently - collapsed.

In March 1962, Estes was indicted on fraud charges. Two months later, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Orville Freeman said Marshall had been the only man who could provide some of the answers to questions about Estes' involvement in the cotton allotment program.

Days later, a state district judge in Bryan authorized the exhumation of Marshall's body. An autopsy by Harris County Medical Examiner Joseph Jachimczyk revealed that Marshall suffered not only five gunshot wounds to his lower left abdomen but also carbon monoxide poisoning and a head injury. The bruise to Marshall's head occurred before his death, Jachimczyk said, and would have been incapacitating."

Sybil Marshall, the wife of the slain Agriculture Department official, said Thursday, "I'm kind of shocked. I don't know what to think."

Mrs. Marshall said her family always believed her husband had been murdered. "I can't believe he would do that to himself (commit suicide), she said. "He was a good man."

Estes, despite two federal trials and subsequent prison terms in the following two decades, steadfastly had refused to discuss his relationship with Lyndon Johnson or the Marshall murder. Called to testify before a 1962 grand jury investigating Marshall's death, Estes repeatedly invoked his constitutional right against self-incrimination, according to press reports at the time.

"Daddy's silence... allowed Lyndon Johnson to become president," Estes' daughter, Pam Estes, wrote in a book about her father titled BILLIE SOL, which was released last week.

"During that time, Daddy had been supplying Lyndon Johnson with large infusions of cash, not only for his own political needs but for people Johnson himself chose to help.

"Sometimes Johnson would send people like Ralph Yarborough directly to Daddy for fund-raising help. On other occasions, Johnson would get bundles of cash from Daddy and distribute it himself. Since those transactions were all cash, there is no reliable way of knowing how much money went to Johnson or what became of it.

"Daddy has steadfastly refused to talk about that part of his life with anyone, even me," she wrote. Wallace, whom sources said Estes named as the triggerman in Marshall's murder, at one time had dated Johnson's sister, Josefa, according to a friend of the Johnson family who asked not to be identified. Johnson's sister died in 1961.

However, Horace Busby, a close friend of Johnson's, said Johnson met Wallace only once, when Carter brought Wallace to Johnson's home in Washington. Wallace was convicted in 1952 of killing John Douglas Kinser of Austin. Testimony in that case revealed that Kinser had been having an affair with Wallace's wife. Wallace was sentenced to a five-year prison term, which was suspended.

Wallace was represented in his 1952 trial by Austin criminal defense lawyer John Cofer, now deceased. Cofer, a longtime LBJ confidant, had represented Johnson in the Jim Wells County "Box 13" voter fraud case in 1948. Because of the slim edge of 87 votes he received from Box 13, Johnson won a runoff election against Coke Stevenson for the U.S. Senate.

Cofer defended Estes in his 1962 fraud trial. Ms. Estes said in her book that Cofer was hired "at the insistence of Lyndon Johnson."

Cofer rested Estes' case without calling any defense witnesses. "I feel that that was done to make sure there was no opportunity of implicating Lyndon Johnson during any testimony or cross examination," Ms. Estes wrote.

"It should be clear by now that it was Lyndon Johnson who paved the way for the preferential treatment Daddy received from the Agriculture Department," she wrote..."

(end quote)

There is more evidence that Malcolm Wallace was the murderer of Henry Marshall, but space on this venue does not allow for it.

These are six examples of how Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History" has distorted the facts of our book. It makes me wonder how many other distortions exist within his books pages.

Glen Sample

Glen: Congratulations on your work above citing the six examples. It is well written and moderate in tone, which means it will be carefullly read by researchers in the years to come.

Doug

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Six mistakes Bugliosi makes regarding my book.

April 13, 2009

A response By Glen Sample to Vincent Bugliosi's critique of "The Men on the Sixth Floor" contained in his Book "Reclaiming History."

Vincent Bugliosi's "Reclaiming History", a five pound monster of a book, is thought by many to be the nail in the coffin of conspiracy theorists. Indeed, his experience as a prosecutor has served him well in his response to some of the silly JFK assassination theories that have been forwarded over the decades. Like shooting fish in a barrel, Bugliosi takes them all on, dismissing them one after another. For this I applaud him.

Glen,

While I think this is a well-reasoned and persuasive post, I wonder about the above quote regarding Bugliosi's response to "conspiracy theorists." Imho, there is nothing to applaud about his gargantuan collection of lies. He was dishonest in his assessment of the critics, just as he was dishonest in his assessment of the evidence in this case.

You're much more magnanimous towards this guy than I would be.

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