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http://www.boston.com/news/science/article...thogen_mystery/

WASHINGTON - The US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Frederick, Md., is under investigation by the Army's Criminal Investigation Command for the possible disappearance of some of its stock of deadly pathogens, an Army spokesman said.

The Frederick News-Post reported yesterday that since at least February, agents have been trying to discover what happened to pathogens that may have gone missing from 1987 to 2008. The investigation coincides with the suspension of most research at the Army lab in February as authorities attempt to find errors in an inventory of their biological materials.

Christopher Grey, public affairs chief for the Criminal Investigation Command, confirmed yesterday that the command is investigating the possibility of missing virus samples from the institute. "We have an ongoing investigation at Fort Detrick," Grey said, but he declined to say when the investigation began or when it is likely to be completed.

The investigation seems to center on missing samples of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, a mosquito-borne virus that usually causes a mild flulike illness but can also cause brain inflammation and death. It has potential for use as a biological weapon, but is far less lethal than some other agents the lab works with, such as anthrax bacteria and Ebola virus.

The News-Post cited two support staff members who said they had been questioned by investigators from Fort Meade, Md., about missing samples of the virus. Alan Schmaljohn, a longtime scientist at the lab who now works for the University of Maryland, said he had also been questioned two or three months ago as someone who once had access to the virus.

"They caught me on my cellphone on the road and I stopped and talked to them for quite a long time," Schmaljohn said.

Schmaljohn said it wasn't clear from the questions exactly what the investigators sought, though he believed they wanted to know what happened to three missing vials carrying small quantities of the virus.

"The number of vials is utterly meaningless," Schmaljohn said. "Three vials missing is no indication of any evildoing. . . . It's almost equivalent to saying you're missing 3 cents out of the national budget. . . . From the scientists' point of view it is inconsequential, but from the regulator's point of view it is an indication of sloppiness, and they are finally going to take rugged action."

A problem in accounting for Venezuelan equine encephalitis was what triggered the earlier suspension of most research at the lab. A spot check in January found 20 samples of the virus in a box of vials instead of the 16 that had been listed in the institute's database, Caree Vander Linden, the spokeswoman for the institute, said in February.

The lab has been under heavy pressure to tighten security since anthrax attacks in 2001 that killed five people and sickened 17 others. FBI investigators think the anthrax strain used in the attacks originated at the Army lab, and its prime suspect, Bruce E. Ivins, researched anthrax there. Ivins committed suicide last year.

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http://www.boston.com/news/science/article...thogen_mystery/

WASHINGTON - The US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Frederick, Md., is under investigation by the Army's Criminal Investigation Command for the possible disappearance of some of its stock of deadly pathogens, an Army spokesman said.

The Frederick News-Post reported yesterday that since at least February, agents have been trying to discover what happened to pathogens that may have gone missing from 1987 to 2008. The investigation coincides with the suspension of most research at the Army lab in February as authorities attempt to find errors in an inventory of their biological materials.

Christopher Grey, public affairs chief for the Criminal Investigation Command, confirmed yesterday that the command is investigating the possibility of missing virus samples from the institute. "We have an ongoing investigation at Fort Detrick," Grey said, but he declined to say when the investigation began or when it is likely to be completed.

The investigation seems to center on missing samples of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, a mosquito-borne virus that usually causes a mild flulike illness but can also cause brain inflammation and death. It has potential for use as a biological weapon, but is far less lethal than some other agents the lab works with, such as anthrax bacteria and Ebola virus.

The News-Post cited two support staff members who said they had been questioned by investigators from Fort Meade, Md., about missing samples of the virus. Alan Schmaljohn, a longtime scientist at the lab who now works for the University of Maryland, said he had also been questioned two or three months ago as someone who once had access to the virus.

"They caught me on my cellphone on the road and I stopped and talked to them for quite a long time," Schmaljohn said.

Schmaljohn said it wasn't clear from the questions exactly what the investigators sought, though he believed they wanted to know what happened to three missing vials carrying small quantities of the virus.

"The number of vials is utterly meaningless," Schmaljohn said. "Three vials missing is no indication of any evildoing. . . . It's almost equivalent to saying you're missing 3 cents out of the national budget. . . . From the scientists' point of view it is inconsequential, but from the regulator's point of view it is an indication of sloppiness, and they are finally going to take rugged action."

A problem in accounting for Venezuelan equine encephalitis was what triggered the earlier suspension of most research at the lab. A spot check in January found 20 samples of the virus in a box of vials instead of the 16 that had been listed in the institute's database, Caree Vander Linden, the spokeswoman for the institute, said in February.

The lab has been under heavy pressure to tighten security since anthrax attacks in 2001 that killed five people and sickened 17 others. FBI investigators think the anthrax strain used in the attacks originated at the Army lab, and its prime suspect, Bruce E. Ivins, researched anthrax there. Ivins committed suicide last year.

Wonderful. One wonders how many other deadly pathogens are 'missing'. Even AIDS is sometimes suspect as having come from here by accident or on purpose. If one looks at how stockpiles of weapons are moved from military inventories to secret ops and such, why not biologicals. The idea of rogues taking the Anthrax or this new material is, IMO, less likely then a small secretly-approved operation to move it into the 'black world' for who-knows-what. There are pathogens that could kill all in a city or region or the planet in short order, in case you want to loose sleep. Ebola spread over a wide area [to name just one pathogen] would render the area a death zone that few, if any, would survive.........most would live just a week or so of horrible deathpangs. Brave New World. Reminds me of the missing nukes too. We have a rogue state posing as the State, face it. The Anthrax was part II of the 9/11 attacks and was NOT done by one disgruntled employee. He was the patsy and killed in his role.

Let's see, this rinky dink newspaper from Frederick, Maryland reports that there's a secret military investigation into the loss of vials of biological warfare viruses on one day, and the next day there's a major virus outbreak in Mexico City that requires the government to declare martial law.

Could there be a connection?

BK

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http://www.boston.com/news/science/article...thogen_mystery/

WASHINGTON - The US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Frederick, Md., is under investigation by the Army's Criminal Investigation Command for the possible disappearance of some of its stock of deadly pathogens, an Army spokesman said.

The Frederick News-Post reported yesterday that since at least February, agents have been trying to discover what happened to pathogens that may have gone missing from 1987 to 2008. The investigation coincides with the suspension of most research at the Army lab in February as authorities attempt to find errors in an inventory of their biological materials.

Christopher Grey, public affairs chief for the Criminal Investigation Command, confirmed yesterday that the command is investigating the possibility of missing virus samples from the institute. "We have an ongoing investigation at Fort Detrick," Grey said, but he declined to say when the investigation began or when it is likely to be completed.

The investigation seems to center on missing samples of Venezuelan equine encephalitis, a mosquito-borne virus that usually causes a mild flulike illness but can also cause brain inflammation and death. It has potential for use as a biological weapon, but is far less lethal than some other agents the lab works with, such as anthrax bacteria and Ebola virus.

The News-Post cited two support staff members who said they had been questioned by investigators from Fort Meade, Md., about missing samples of the virus. Alan Schmaljohn, a longtime scientist at the lab who now works for the University of Maryland, said he had also been questioned two or three months ago as someone who once had access to the virus.

"They caught me on my cellphone on the road and I stopped and talked to them for quite a long time," Schmaljohn said.

Schmaljohn said it wasn't clear from the questions exactly what the investigators sought, though he believed they wanted to know what happened to three missing vials carrying small quantities of the virus.

"The number of vials is utterly meaningless," Schmaljohn said. "Three vials missing is no indication of any evildoing. . . . It's almost equivalent to saying you're missing 3 cents out of the national budget. . . . From the scientists' point of view it is inconsequential, but from the regulator's point of view it is an indication of sloppiness, and they are finally going to take rugged action."

A problem in accounting for Venezuelan equine encephalitis was what triggered the earlier suspension of most research at the lab. A spot check in January found 20 samples of the virus in a box of vials instead of the 16 that had been listed in the institute's database, Caree Vander Linden, the spokeswoman for the institute, said in February.

The lab has been under heavy pressure to tighten security since anthrax attacks in 2001 that killed five people and sickened 17 others. FBI investigators think the anthrax strain used in the attacks originated at the Army lab, and its prime suspect, Bruce E. Ivins, researched anthrax there. Ivins committed suicide last year.

Wonderful. One wonders how many other deadly pathogens are 'missing'. Even AIDS is sometimes suspect as having come from here by accident or on purpose. If one looks at how stockpiles of weapons are moved from military inventories to secret ops and such, why not biologicals. The idea of rogues taking the Anthrax or this new material is, IMO, less likely then a small secretly-approved operation to move it into the 'black world' for who-knows-what. There are pathogens that could kill all in a city or region or the planet in short order, in case you want to loose sleep. Ebola spread over a wide area [to name just one pathogen] would render the area a death zone that few, if any, would survive.........most would live just a week or so of horrible deathpangs. Brave New World. Reminds me of the missing nukes too. We have a rogue state posing as the State, face it. The Anthrax was part II of the 9/11 attacks and was NOT done by one disgruntled employee. He was the patsy and killed in his role.

Let's see, this rinky dink newspaper from Frederick, Maryland reports that there's a secret military investigation into the loss of vials of biological warfare viruses on one day, and the next day there's a major virus outbreak in Mexico City that requires the government to declare martial law.

Could there be a connection?

BK

*************************************************************************

My email to Peter this morning:

Hey Peter,

Could this be an indication of bio-op ethnic cleansing aimed at Mexico's drug cartels? Fort Detrick, MD working overtime, these days?

Ter

Swine flu empties Mexico City's churches, streets

AP

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Mexico swine flu has 'pandemic potential' Play Video AP – Mexico swine flu has 'pandemic potential'

* Swine Flu Slideshow:Swine Flu

* Fear Over Potential Flu Pandemic Play Video Video:Fear Over Potential Flu Pandemic ABC News

* 8 NYC Prep School Students Likely Have Swine Flu Play Video Video:8 NYC Prep School Students Likely Have Swine Flu CBS 2 New York

A police officer, wearing a surgical mask, guards the entrance to the AP – A police officer, wearing a surgical mask, guards the entrance to the Metropolitan Cathedral in Mexico …

By DAVID KOOP, Associated Press Writer David Koop, Associated Press Writer – 1 hr 20 mins ago

MEXICO CITY – Churches stood empty Sunday in heavily Roman Catholic Mexico City after services were canceled, and health workers screened airports and bus stations for people sickened by a new strain of swine flu that experts fear could become a global epidemic.

President Felipe Calderon has assumed new powers to isolate people infected with the deadly swine flu strain that Mexico's health minister says has killed up to 81 people and likely sickened 1,324 since April 13.

Mexican soldiers and health workers patrolled the capital's subway system handing out surgical masks and looking for possible flu cases. People were advised to seek medical attention if they suffered from multiple symptoms — which include a fever of more than 100 degrees, body aches, coughing, a sore throat, respiratory congestion and, in some cases, vomiting and diarrhea.

Hundreds of public events from concerts to sports matches to were called off to keep people from congregating and spreading the virus in crowds. Zoos were closed and visits to juvenile correction centers were suspended.

About a dozen federal police in blue surgical masks stood in front of Mexico City's Metropolitan Cathedral, which was nearly empty after a measure canceling services to avoid large concentrations of people.

Johana Chavez, 22, said she showed up for her confirmation only to find a sign advising that all Masses, baptisms and confirmations were canceled until further notice.

"We are all Catholic so this is a big step, closing the cathedral," she said, cradling a squirming infant in her arms. "I guess I'll have to come back later."

Markets and restaurants were nearly empty. And throngs of Mexicans — some with just a fever — rushed to hospitals.

Mexico appears to have lost valuable days or weeks in detecting the new flu strain, a combination of pig, bird and human viruses that humans may have no natural immunity to. Health officials have found cases in 16 Mexican states. Two dozen new suspected cases were reported in the capital on Saturday alone.

Eleven cases of swine flu were confirmed in California, Texas and Kansas, with more suspected in New York City.

The first death was in southern Oaxaca state on April 13, but Mexico didn't send the first of 14 mucous samples to the CDC until April 18, around the same time it dispatched health teams to hospitals looking for patients with severe flu or pnuemonia-like symptoms.

Those teams noticed something strange: The flu was killing people aged 20 to 40. Flu victims are usually either infants or the elderly. The Spanish flu pandemic, which killed at least 40 million people worldwide in 1918-19, also first struck otherwise healthy young adults.

The World Health Organization on Saturday asked all countries to step up reporting and surveillance of the disease, as airports around the world were screening travelers from Mexico for flu symptoms.

On Sunday, New Zealand reported that 10 students "likely" have swine flu after a school trip to Mexico, though Health Minister Tony Ryall said none of the students was seriously ill and there was no guarantee they had swine flu. Israel's Health Ministry said there is one suspected case in that country and France is investigating four possible cases.

WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said the outbreak of the never-before-seen virus has "pandemic potential." But she said it is still too early to tell if it would become a pandemic — an epidemic that spreads in humans around the world.

WHO guidance calls for isolating the sick and blanketing everyone around them with anti-viral drugs such as Tamiflu. Too many patients have been identified in Mexico's teeming capital for such a solution now. But some pandemic flu experts say it's also too late to contain the disease to Mexico and the United States.

"Anything that would be about containing it right now would purely be a political move," said Michael Osterholm at the University of Minnesota.

Mexican authorities ordered schools closed in the capital and the states of Mexico and San Luis Potosi until May 6.

A team from the Centers for Disease Control was in Mexico to help set up detection testing for the swine flu strain, something Mexico previously lacked.

Health authorities noticed a threefold spike in flu cases in late March and early April, but thought it was a late rebound in the December-February flu season.

Testing at domestic labs did not alert doctors to the new strain. Health Secretary Jose Cordova acknowledged Mexican labs lacked the profiling data needed to detect the previously unknown strain.

Even though U.S. labs detected the swine flu in California and Texas before last weekend, Mexican authorities as recently as Wednesday were referring to it as a late-season flu.

But mid-afternoon Thursday, Mexico City Health Secretary Dr. Armando Ahued said, officials got a call "from the United States and Canada, the most important laboratories in the field, telling us this was a new virus."

Asked why there were so many deaths in Mexico, and none so far among the U.S. cases, Cordova noted that the U.S. cases involved children — who haven't been among the fatal cases in Mexico, either.

"There are immune factors that are giving children some sort of defense, that is the only explanation we have," he said.

Another factor may be that some Mexican patients may have delayed seeking medical help too long, Cordova said.

Others are forced to work and leave their homes despite health concerns.

Wearing two dirty, blue surgical masks she says she found and a heavy coat, Daniela Briseno swept garbage early Sunday morning from the streets in Mexico City.

"This chill air must be doing me harm. I should be at home but I have a family to support," the 31-year-old said.

Scientists have warned for years about the potential for a pandemic from viruses that mix genetic material from humans and animals.

A "seed stock" genetically matched to the new swine flu virus has been created by the CDC, said Dr. Richard Besser, the agency's acting director. If the government decides vaccine production is necessary, manufacturers would need that stock to get started.

___

Associated Press writers Mark Stevenson and Olga R. Rodriguez in Mexico City; Frank Jordans in Geneva; Mike Stobbe in Atlanta; Malcolm Ritter in New York; and Maria Cheng in London contributed to this report.

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I believe that assassination by BIOP is commonplace. Death by "natural causes.

Remember...the CIA ADMITTED to trying to kill Castro with BIOP germs and toxins.

Jack

I remember reading a small news report of missing virals of virus from Ft. Detrick back in the mid-70s, and then was surprised to see the whole Legionaires Disease epidemic unfold at the Bellview Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia in the summer of 1976 - Bicentennial Summer.

BK

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I believe that assassination by BIOP is commonplace. Death by "natural causes.

Remember...the CIA ADMITTED to trying to kill Castro with BIOP germs and toxins.

Jack

I remember reading a small news report of missing virals of virus from Ft. Detrick back in the mid-70s, and then was surprised to see the whole Legionaires Disease epidemic unfold at the Bellview Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia in the summer of 1976 - Bicentennial Summer.

BK

****************************************************************

"I remember reading a small news report of missing virals of virus from Ft. Detrick back in the mid-70s, and then was surprised to see the whole Legionaires Disease epidemic unfold at the Bellview Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia in the summer of 1976 - Bicentennial Summer."

I was going to bring that up, as well. I saw nothing coincidental about that, either.

Shortly after the 9/11 debacle, KCET put a panel of medical experts together from Stanford, UCLA, USC, and Cedars-Sinai for a NOVA special to address the aspects of bio warfare and how the city of L.A. would be equipped to respond to it. The representative from UCLA seemed the most concerned, especially as to the lack of, or shortage in number of, loading dock spaces, which are converted to decontamination stations in worst case scenario disaster drills.

He also happen to mention "age specific" biologicals that could be used to target people over the age of 55. Legionnaires Disease immediately came to mind at the time. So, if these major medical centers were already anticipating bio-weaponry on that scale, and with age-specific designations, you can bet your behind that these have already been concocted and available for use, if not abuse, should they fall into the wrong hands, or gain access into black market channels of distribution.

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  • 2 weeks later...

INFLUENZA A (H1N1) - WORLDWIDE (23)

***********************************

A ProMED-mail post <http://www.promedmail.org>

ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases <http://www.isid.org>

In this update:

[1] Outbreak analysis

[2] UK perspective

******

[1] Outbreak analysis

Date: Mon 11 May 2009

Source: Science Express [edited] <http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/1176062>

Pandemic Potential of a Strain of Influenza A (H1N1): Early Findings By:

Christophe Fraser 1, Christl A. Donnelly 1, Simon Cauchemez 1, William P. Hanage 1, Maria D. Van Kerkhove 1, T. Deirdre Hollingsworth 1, Jamie Griffin 1, Rebecca F. Baggaley 1, Helen E. Jenkins 1, Emily J. Lyons 1, Thibaut Jombart 1, Wes R. Hinsley 1, Nicholas C. Grassly 1, Francois Balloux 1, Azra C. Ghani 1, Neil M. Ferguson 1*, Andrew Rambaut 2, Oliver G. Pybus 3, Hugo Lopez-Gatell 4, Celia M Apluche-Aranda 5, Ietza Bojorquez Chapela 4, Ethel Palacios Zavala 4, Dulce Ma. Espejo Guevara 6, Francesco Checchi 7, Erika Garcia 7, Stephane Hugonnet 7, Cathy Roth 7. The WHO Rapid Pandemic Assessment Collaboration (All authors are members of this collaboration. Correspondence to Neil M. Ferguson <neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk >). 1 MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis & Modelling, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, Faculty of Medicine, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK. 2 Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK. 3 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK. 4 Directorate General of Epidemiology, FCO. De P. Miranda 177 5th Floor, Mexico City, 01480, Mexico. 5 National Institute of Epidemiological Diagnosis and Reference, Prolongacion Carpio No. 470 (3 piso), Col Santo Tomas, Mexico City, C.P. 11340, Mexico. 6 Secretaria de Salud - Servicios de Salud de Veracruz Soconusco No. 36 Colonia Aguacatal C.P. 910 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico State. 7 World Health Organization, 20 Av. Appia, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.

A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus has spread rapidly across the globe. Judging its pandemic potential is difficult with limited data but nevertheless is essential to inform appropriate health responses. By analyzing the outbreak in Mexico, early data on international spread, and viral genetic diversity, we make an early assessment of transmissibility and severity. Our estimates suggest that 23 000 (range 6000-32 000) individuals had been infected in Mexico by late April 2009, giving an estimated case fatality ratio (CFR) of 0.4 per cent (range 0.3 to 1.5 per cent) based on confirmed and suspect deaths reported up to that time. In a community outbreak in the small community of La Gloria, Veracruz, no deaths were attributed to infection, giving an upper 95 per cent bound on CFR of 0.6 per cent. Thus, while substantial uncertainty remains, clinical severity appears less than that seen in 1918 but comparable with that seen in 1957. Clinical attack rates in children in La Gloria were twice those in adults (less than 15 years of age: 61 per cent, 15: 29 per cent). Three different epidemiological analyses gave R0 estimates in the range 1.4-1.6, while a genetic analysis gave a central estimate of 1.2. This range of values is consistent with 14 to 73 generations of human-to-human transmission having occurred in Mexico to late April 2009. Transmissibility is therefore substantially higher than seasonal flu and comparable with lower estimates of R0 obtained from previous influenza pandemics.

--

communicated by:

ProMED-mail <promed@promedmail.org>

******

[2] UK perspective

Date: Mon 11 May 2009

Source: BBC-News [edited] <http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/8044299.stm>

Ten new cases of swine flu have been confirmed in England, taking the total number in the UK to 65, the Health Protection Agency has said. Another 7 adults and 3 children have been diagnosed with the virus. The news comes as a UK analysis concludes that the World Health Organization was right to raise the alert over a potential global flu pandemic. It says the latest outbreak is likely to be comparable to the pandemics of the 20th century.

The study, led by Professor Neil Ferguson, of Imperial College, London, is published in the leading journal Science [see preceding report]. It finds that -- as suspected -- the virus is more infectious than normal. Seasonal flu normally infects one in 10 of the population. So far, swine flu has infected 1/3rd of the people that have come into contact with it in Mexico. However, Professor Ferguson admitted it was difficult to quantify the impact on human health at this stage. His study suggests that swine flu could kill between 4 in every 1000 infected people and 14 in every 1000. Professor Ferguson said: "The World Health Organization was correct in its judgment that this is a virus that should not be ignored, but these figures suggest at this stage it is not going to be catastrophic."

Of the new cases in England, 4 are in eastern England, and 3 are in the north west. Three more are in London, including a pupil at Hampton School in south west London. The school has been closed for a week from Monday [11 May 2009] as a precaution. Four other schools in England have reopened. Hampton School, which is an independent boys' secondary, shut its doors after a Year 7 pupil fell ill after traveling overseas. The school said the boy was recovering well at home, and GCSE and A level exams, the bulk of which commence this week, would continue as planned. It is offering antiviral drugs to all children in Year 7, any staff who had close contact with the pupil, and any other children who shared school coach journeys with him. These include some girls from the nearby Lady Eleanor Holles School in Hampton.

A Department of Health spokesman said on Monday [11 May 2009] that all infections in the UK so far had been "mild". Thanks to early diagnosis and treatment with antivirals, the spread of the virus is being limited and symptoms reduced. "But it is right to prepare for the possibility of a global pandemic. The UK's arrangements are continuing to ensure that we are well-placed to deal with this new infection." The 2 cases in London are both connected with Alleyn's School in Dulwich, which was closed on 4 May 2009 after 5 pupils were confirmed with the virus. NHS London said the 2 latest cases were a 12 year old pupil and a parent. Despite the development, the school reopened on Monday [11 May 2009], and the Health Protection Agency stressed that because of the time taken to diagnose swine flu, all 10 newly-confirmed patients may already have recovered and may be symptom-free. NHS East of England said the 4 cases in its area included a man from North Weald, Essex who had close contact with an already confirmed case and a child from Canvey Island, also in Essex, who recently visited Mexico. Another case involved a man from Lowestoft, Suffolk, who recently visited Florida, and the 4th was a woman from the Huntingdonshire district in Cambridgeshire. Investigations are continuing into the origin of her infection. In the north west, 2 of those infected are adults who have returned from abroad, and the 3rd adult is a case of close contact.

Meanwhile, holiday companies Thomson and First Choice said they were cancelling all flights to the Mexican resorts of Cancun and Cozumel up to and including 18 May 2009. They also said that their last holiday makers still in Mexico would be returning home on Monday [11 May 2009].

--

communicated by:

ProMED-mail <promed@promedmail.org>

[see also:

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (22): case counts 20090511.1759

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (21) 20090510.1749

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (20): case counts 20090510.1741

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (19) 20090509.1733

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (18): case counts 20090509.1728

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (17) 20090508.1722

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (16): case counts 20090507.1715

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (15) 20090507.1709

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (14): case counts 20090507.1702

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (13) 20090506.1695

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (12): case counts 20090505.1681

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (11): coincident H3N2 variation 20090505.1679

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (10): case counts 20090504.1675

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (09) 20090504.1673

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (08): case counts 20090503.1660

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (07) 20090503.1658

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (06): case counts 20090502.1654

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (05) 20090503.1657

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (04): case counts 20090501.1648

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (03) 20090501.1646

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide (02): case counts 20090430.1638

Influenza A (H1N1) - worldwide 20090430.1636]

...................cp/msp/sh

Edited by Evan Burton
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