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John Ritchson
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:angry:

This is a basic [how-done-it] article on the forging of CE-399 proving multible rifles we entered into evidence as "THE KILL-SHOT WEAPON" I will try to post the comparison photos on this forum but if not they can be found on Jerry McCleer's website.

____________________________________________________________________

That the forgers of the Archive's Rifle Serial Number correctly

approximated the positional spacing of the charactors is about all

that can be said for them as the rest of the job is reflective of the

efforts of rank amateurs.

The beginning and end of each charactor in the Archive photo is much

more ornate than the charactors stamped on the Moschettieri del Duce

Carcano as depicted in Mike O'Neil's Life photo, beginning in a

tear-drop configuration. The charactors in the Life photo show no such

tear-drop imprint, indicating that a different set of metal stamps were

used. Also, the letter,[C] in the archive photo ends in a curious,

blocky base that makes it almost look like a "G".

The first operation in forging serial numbers is to fashion a set

of metal stamps that closely resemble the origional stamps by either

working off of photos or even better, taking a wax print of the

origional serial numbers and producing from it a metal-mold using the

Lost Wax Process. That the forgers did not do this indicated to me that

they were pressed for time and left out some critical steps, or they

were simply incompentent, take your pick.

Next, the barrel to be altered must be unscrewed from the reciever and

pre-heated in a forge to a uniform temperture above the temperture

needed to draw the barrel's temper, known as the annealation point in

which the barrel just begins to glow red in a dark room. This is done to

insure uniformity in the subsequent operations. I will explain later

how I know this step was not done by the forgers.

The next step involves taking the barrel which is now at the annealing

temperture and adding to the barrel's original serial numbers,

sufficient metal as to completely fill in the charactors, usually by

welding a bead across the original charactors using steel of the same

metalurgical properties as the barrel steel. I found that 7018 low

hydrogen welding rod is compatable to most barrel steel, but I believe

the forgers in this case used a mild-steel general purpose rod such as

7014 which can cause problems which I will expand upon later. This is

the step at which the forgers started. An even better method involves

using a rare gas heli-arc welder and using rod fashioned from rifle

barrel steel as a filler which makes the forgery even more difficult

to detect.

After the now welded barrel has been allowed to slowly cool in a pre-

heated kiln to preserve the annealation, it is placed on a lathe and

turned down until the weld has been feathered out of the barrel, leaving

a now pristine barrel. The forgers jumped the cool-down step and simply

removed the weld.

Finally, the annealed pristine barrel is restamped with the new serial

numbers and reheated up to the temper point, and then quenched in such a

way as to properly draw the barrel's temper to insure a uniform meld

all the way around. I believe the forgers left out this step as well.

If these steps are not closely followed, any barrel so altered will

show evidence of that fact in the form of pitting, and hard spots due

to the uneven thermodynamic conditions the barrel will be exposed to.

Also, there will be discoloration and a clear line of demarcation

between the area welded and the rest of the barrel, but this is usually

too fine of a distinction to be resolved in a photo so I'll not address

that issue, as I'm still evaluating the evidence jerrymac has posted.

Now, look at the bottom of the letter, [C] and the numerals, [2], and

[7] on the archive photos. you will see defects present whereby the

pitting and hard spots prevented the metal stamps from making a clean

imprint on the barrel. This proves the forgers did not anneal the

rifle barrel prior to welding the bead on it. Also, the shine of

reflected light off of this area of the rifle's barrel in the archive

photo indicates that the barrel was not properly blued or anodized

subsequent to the forgery. [Combat weapons are not supposed to reflect

light in this manner.]

This is how I know the archive rifle's serial number was forged and

how I know that the forgers were either rank amateurs or else they were

so pressed for time that they couldn't do a proper job of it, and the

reason I know how to forge serial numbers is because part of my business

is authenticating rare and classic firearms and detecting forgeries is

a major part of that, and I might add, I'm damned good at it.

With Regard,

John Ritchson(SSGT. 499th TC USATC HG US Army Class of 69)

(GunSmith/Ballistician,Black Eagle Gun Works)

(Survivor, SE Asian Games, 11BRAVO7,Tet 1970)

************************************************************

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that

heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it) but

"That's Funny..." Isaac Asimov

************************************************************

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:ph34r:

This is a basic [how-done-it] article on the forging of CE-399 proving multible rifles we entered into evidence as "THE KILL-SHOT WEAPON" I will try to post the comparison photos on this forum but if not they can be found on Jerry McCleer's website.

____________________________________________________________________

 

That the forgers of the Archive's Rifle Serial Number correctly

approximated the positional spacing of the charactors is about all

that can be said for them as the rest of the job is reflective of the

efforts of rank amateurs.

  The beginning and end of each charactor in the Archive photo is much

more ornate than the charactors stamped on the Moschettieri del Duce

Carcano as depicted in Mike O'Neil's Life photo, beginning in a

tear-drop configuration. The charactors in the Life photo show no such

tear-drop imprint, indicating that a different set of metal stamps were

used. Also, the letter,[C] in the archive photo ends in a curious,

blocky base that makes it almost look like a "G".

  The first operation in forging serial numbers is to fashion a set

of metal stamps that closely resemble the origional stamps by either

working off of photos or even better, taking a wax print of the

origional serial numbers and producing from it a metal-mold using the

Lost Wax Process. That the forgers did not do this indicated to me that

they were pressed for time and left out some critical steps, or they

were simply incompentent, take your pick.

  Next, the barrel to be altered must be unscrewed from the reciever and

pre-heated in a forge to a uniform temperture above the temperture

needed to draw the barrel's temper, known as the annealation point in

which the barrel just begins to glow red in a dark room. This is done to

insure uniformity in the subsequent operations. I will explain later

how I know this step was not done by the forgers.

  The next step involves taking the barrel which is now at the annealing

temperture and adding to the barrel's original serial numbers,

sufficient metal as to completely fill in the charactors, usually by

welding a bead across the original charactors using steel of the same

metalurgical properties as the barrel steel. I found that 7018 low

hydrogen welding rod is compatable to most barrel steel, but I believe

the forgers in this case used a mild-steel general purpose rod such as

7014 which can cause problems which I will expand upon later. This is

the step at which the forgers started. An even better method involves

using a rare gas heli-arc welder and using rod fashioned from rifle

barrel steel as a filler which makes the forgery even more difficult

to detect.

  After the now welded barrel has been allowed to slowly cool in a pre-

heated kiln to preserve the annealation, it is placed on a lathe and

turned down until the weld has been feathered out of the barrel, leaving

a now pristine barrel. The forgers jumped the cool-down step and simply

removed the weld.

  Finally, the annealed pristine barrel is restamped with the new serial

numbers and reheated up to the temper point, and then quenched in such a

way as to properly draw the barrel's temper to insure a uniform meld

all the way around. I believe the forgers left out this step as well.

  If these steps are not closely followed, any barrel so altered will

show evidence of that fact in the form of pitting, and hard spots due

to the uneven thermodynamic conditions the barrel will be exposed to.

Also, there will be discoloration and a clear line of demarcation

between the area welded and the rest of the barrel, but this is usually

too fine of a distinction to be resolved in a photo so I'll not address

that issue, as I'm still evaluating the evidence jerrymac has posted.

  Now, look at the bottom of the letter, [C] and the numerals, [2], and

[7] on the archive photos. you will see defects present whereby the

pitting and hard spots prevented the metal stamps from making a clean

imprint on the barrel. This proves the forgers did not anneal the

rifle barrel prior to welding the bead on it. Also, the shine of

reflected light off of this area of the rifle's barrel in the archive

photo indicates that the barrel was not properly blued or anodized

subsequent to the forgery. [Combat weapons are not supposed to reflect

light in this manner.]

  This is how I know the archive rifle's serial number was forged and

how I know that the forgers were either rank amateurs or else they were

so pressed for time that they couldn't do a proper job of it, and the

reason I know how to forge serial numbers is because part of my business

is authenticating rare and classic firearms and detecting forgeries is

a major part of that, and I might add, I'm damned good at it.

  With Regard,

  John Ritchson(SSGT. 499th TC USATC HG US Army Class of 69)

                (GunSmith/Ballistician,Black Eagle Gun Works)

                (Survivor, SE Asian Games, 11BRAVO7,Tet 1970)

  ************************************************************

  The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that

  heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it) but

  "That's Funny..." Isaac Asimov

  ************************************************************

Thanks, Sarge. Great explanation. I recommend Jerry McCleer's excellent

website to everyone. Go to

http://jfkresearch.freehomepage.com/c2766.html

Jack

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