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Bernice Moore
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http://www.dallasnew...3a0.html:blink:

b

47 years after JFK's assassination, crowds, theories gather at Dealey Plaza

''Some, though, just come to remember.''

12:00 AM CST on Tuesday, November 23, 2010

By ERINN CONNOR / The Dallas Morning News

econnor@dallasnews.com

You can always count on a few constants at Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22.

clikEnlarge.gif11-23-2010.NMC_23JFK47thMAIN1.GR62U04HS.1.jpg NATHAN HUNSINGER/DMNFabian Olguin told his children Fabian Jr., 9, and Emily, 9, about JFK's assassination. They were among the crowds Monday at Dealey Plaza.

People grinning for photos on the white X, the approximate spot on Elm Street where President John F. Kennedy was shot in 1963; visitors standing on the infamous grassy knoll; fingers pointing toward the so-called sniper's perch on the sixth floor of the old Texas School Book Depository.

But there are few constants when it comes to the theories surrounding JFK's assassination. No detail is too large or too small to bicker over. Everyone's got an opinion.

Those theorists were out in force again Monday, 47 years after the president's death, to argue and reargue their points.

"There are crowds here every year," said Anthony Caglia, who takes a day off work to come down to the plaza each year. "You get all these different stories and theories from all kinds of people."

''Some, though, just come to remember.''

For Jim Stewart, walking on the grassy knoll was on his bucket list.

"I've just always been fascinated by it," said Stewart, who was visiting from Calgary. "I think so much of the United States would've been different if he lived."

Stewart, 55, said he remembers being herded into his elementary school's basement after the assassination and then being sent home and watching the aftermath on TV.

After making the trip to Dallas, Stewart said the scene was different than he imagined.

"Isn't there usually a moment of silence?" he asked, checking his cellphone clock.

That traditionally comes at 12:30 p.m. But during that time, John Judge was making a speech disputing the Warren Commission's assassination findings, which, among other things, concludes that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman.

Judge continued his speech until a young boy remarked, "That moment of silence was pretty loud."

Judge paused around 12:35 for a minute of quiet.

"This is a forum for crazies instead of reverence for what happened," Stewart said as he left the plaza.:blink: sorry bout him...b

For 13 years, Paul Noble has made the trip from Mansfield to join the crowds at Dealey Plaza. What he enjoys most year after year is the amalgam of theories.

"I talk to all kinds of people," said Noble, 52, as a man wandered past with a T-shirt that read: "Who Killed JFK?"

"They have all kinds of theories – that Oswald did it alone, that it was Lyndon Johnson, the CIA , Fidel Castro. Lots of different ideas."

Noble was 5 when Kennedy was shot. He doesn't remember the assassination, but he recalls seeing Jack Ruby shoot Oswald on an old black-and-white TV.

He's been intrigued ever since.

"I'll come here every year until I die," said Noble. "I can't wait till the 50th anniversary. There'll be lots of things going on, probably thousands of people. Maybe even some celebrities."

Standing near a portrait of Kennedy with six white carnations at the base, Tommy Sills still remembers that November day clearly.

He was 9 years old, standing with his father at the corner of Houston and Main streets. He had been allowed to leave school to watch the presidential motorcade.

Sills remembers the roar of the crowd as the car turned the corner,

"Then I thought I heard a motorcycle backfire and didn't think anything of it," said Sills, 57, of Irving. "But with the second shot, people started screaming and I watched the Secret Service agent crawling on the back of the limo."

Sills and his father left downtown right away. He said he had never seen his father that spooked. Curiously, as if nothing had happened, his dad dropped him back off at Otis Brown Elementary School in Irving.

Now a history teacher, Sills sometimes brings his students down to the plaza and gives them a firsthand lesson. "They always have a lot of questions," he said. "Mostly about conspiracies."

Edited by Bernice Moore
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here's more the same from :blink:the same, for a newspaper i would think they would know the word alleged...but...same old from the dallas news..

Move grows for memorial to Dallas officer killed by Oswald after JFK assassination

06:43 AM CST on Tuesday, November 23, 2010

By ROY APPLETON / The Dallas Morning News

rappleton@dallasnews.com Forty-seven years after Lee Harvey Oswald gunned down Dallas police Officer J.D. Tippit in north Oak Cliff, the talk is getting serious about establishing a permanent memorial to the time, place and man. Michael Amonett, president of the Old Oak Cliff Conservation League, says he has begun researching what's required to get a state historical marker placed near the shooting site on 10th Street east of Patton Avenue. Also Online More news, information about Oak Cliff

Blog: Oak Cliff

"He gave his life for his city and his country," Amonett said. "If not for him, they might not have caught" Oswald. The accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy was apprehended at the Texas Theatre after the Tippit shooting. "If we could get it done by the 50th anniversary [in 2013], that would be cool," he said. Farris Rookstool, an authority on the Kennedy assassination, said he would gladly help with the project. "I would see it as a wonderful gift to the memory of J.D. Tippit and the other officers who assisted on the case," said Rookstool, a former assassination records custodian for the FBI. The neighborhood around 10th and Patton will soon have few physical ties to 1963. Homes have been built there in recent years. And the Dallas school district is clearing land for a new Adamson High School. "There's not going to be any historical footprint to remember that time," Rookstool said. "With people dying and everything changing [in the area], a marker would be a fantastic thing." And Amonett said school property could be a good place to put one. Marie Tippit, the officer's widow, said she was approached about a marker not long after the shooting. She said she's not sure why the idea fizzled. "I think it would be a wonderful idea," she said. "It's a piece of history, and that's where he was killed, and there should be a marker there." http://www.dallasnew...n1.4b74270.html

Edited by Bernice Moore
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"There's not going to be any historical footprint to remember that time," Rookstool said. "With people dying and everything changing [in the area], a marker would be a fantastic thing." And Amonett said school property could be a good place to put one. Marie Tippit, the officer's widow, said she was approached about a marker not long after the shooting. She said she's not sure why the idea fizzled. "I think it would be a wonderful idea," she said. "It's a piece of history, and that's where he was killed, and there should be a marker there." http://www.dallasnew...n1.4b74270.html

I'm not sure about him being a hero. Yes, he lost his life, but was he in on the conspiracy? He wasn't told to go to that part of town; just the opposite. Yet that's where he went and that's where he died.

Kathy C

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Excerpt from the article Bernice posted:

....The neighborhood around 10th and Patton will soon have few physical ties to 1963. Homes have been built there in recent years. And the Dallas school district is clearing land for a new Adamson High School. "There's not going to be any historical footprint to remember that time," Rookstool said. "With people dying and everything changing [in the area], a marker would be a fantastic thing."

The WFAA news video shows just how much the neighborhood has changed: http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/Plans-advance-for-Officer-Tippit-memorial-110507339.html

Such a long time ago.....

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Excerpt from the article Bernice posted:

....The neighborhood around 10th and Patton will soon have few physical ties to 1963. Homes have been built there in recent years. And the Dallas school district is clearing land for a new Adamson High School. "There's not going to be any historical footprint to remember that time," Rookstool said. "With people dying and everything changing [in the area], a marker would be a fantastic thing."

The WFAA news video shows just how much the neighborhood has changed: http://www.wfaa.com/...-110507339.html

Such a long time ago.....

yes so many years ago, that have flown, wherever did they go so quickly. here are a few photos of the area, as it was in 1963, there are others as well, it is well documented in that way, as some other areas were not,during the weeks months that followed.

thank you michael, a marker would make it much easier for the visitors to the city conferences and such to find,on their own, but i certainly hope on such they will use the word alleged before lhos name...for years they have had the bad habit of using the assassin...which has never been proven...imo....take care b

Edited by Bernice Moore
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William McKenzie is one of three editorial columnists for the Dallas Morning News. On November 22nd he wrote:

The ghoulishness around November 22

Today, of course, is the 47th anniversary of JFK's death. Being in Dallas, this is naturally an unusual day.

So much has gone on since November 22, 1963, including the fact that we now have an ex-president living here.

But it's almost like time stands still around noon in Dallas on this day.

That's especially true just a few blocks from where I'm writing this. I'm not good at guessing crowds, but I

would bet there were hundreds of people gathered around the Grassy Knoll and Dealey Plaza as I drove by there

after lunch on the way back to the Morning News.

There's a ghoulish (sic) to this annual observation that's kind of unnerving. JFK was the first president I remember

and certainly the one who shaped many of my views about politics as I grew up. But the fascination with his death has

long gone into the world of cultishness.

I don't know whether that's because he was such a fascinating figure or because his assassination was surrounded by mystery.

Whatever the reason, it is kind of bizarre.

I hope the sideshow doesn't overshadow our memories of what that day was really like. I remember it as being a very dark moment,

filled with uncertainty. Not until 9/11 came along, did a day seem so dark. And like 9/11, it defined the next several years.

For that reason, I'd hate to see November 22 become a spectacle. It cheapens what was one darn serious day.

http://dallasmorningviewsblog.dallasnews.com/archives/2010/11/the-ghoulishnes.html

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William McKenzie is one of three editorial columnists for the Dallas Morning News. On November 22nd he wrote:

The ghoulishness around November 22

Today, of course, is the 47th anniversary of JFK's death. Being in Dallas, this is naturally an unusual day.

So much has gone on since November 22, 1963, including the fact that we now have an ex-president living here.

But it's almost like time stands still around noon in Dallas on this day.

That's especially true just a few blocks from where I'm writing this. I'm not good at guessing crowds, but I

would bet there were hundreds of people gathered around the Grassy Knoll and Dealey Plaza as I drove by there

after lunch on the way back to the Morning News.

There's a ghoulish (sic) to this annual observation that's kind of unnerving. JFK was the first president I remember

and certainly the one who shaped many of my views about politics as I grew up. But the fascination with his death has

long gone into the world of cultishness.

I don't know whether that's because he was such a fascinating figure or because his assassination was surrounded by mystery.

Whatever the reason, it is kind of bizarre.

I hope the sideshow doesn't overshadow our memories of what that day was really like. I remember it as being a very dark moment,

filled with uncertainty. Not until 9/11 came along, did a day seem so dark. And like 9/11, it defined the next several years.

For that reason, I'd hate to see November 22 become a spectacle. It cheapens what was one darn serious day.

http://dallasmorning...houlishnes.html

Thanks michael; imo the only that cheapens the day, is the continual knocks each and every year that the dallas news continually make towards dealey plaza and it's visitors, plus their errors within their articles in the past, plus such as not using the word alleged often...same old, i expected more than just this one...perhaps they are slackening somewhat or had a slow day so anytime your doing nothing hit the plaza,, in november..perhaps there is even a notice on the bulletin board as a reminder....sheesh...

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