Jump to content
The Education Forum

Dick Russell


John Simkin
 Share

Recommended Posts

When it was first published Dick Russell's The Man Who Knew Too Much (Carroll & Graf, 1992) was hailed by Publisher's Weekly as "a masterpiece of historical reconstruction".

Daniel Brandt of Namebase has this to say about the book:

If the avalanche of reissued and rehashed JFK assassination books since Oliver Stone's movie has a downside, it's only because the one book that is possibly as significant as all the rest put together might get buried. After over a hundred interviews (including James Angleton and other CIA officials) and seventeen years of persistent research, Dick Russell has written such a book. While providing much new information on the intelligence connection, Russell doesn't offer any easy answers apart from the observation that organized crime alone could not have manipulated the physical evidence and the cover-up without substantial help.

Russell's treatment of the intelligence angle is comprehensive - Oswald in Japan, CIA in Mexico, military intelligence, mind-control, KGB, anti-Castro Cubans, H.L. Hunt et al. Simultaneously, his journalistic hook is an extended cat-and-mouse debriefing of Richard Case Nagell, an untalkative Oswald associate who contracted with U.S. intelligence and also had an arrangement with the Soviets; it still isn't clear who was pulling his strings. Nagell walked into an El Paso bank in September 1963 and fired two shots into the wall so that he would be in jail while "it" came down. "It" happened two months later, on November 22, 1963. If there is space on your shelf for only one JFK assassination book, make it this one.

The book was reissued in a revised, updated edition in 2003, coinciding with the 40th anniversary of the assassination.

I am pleased to announce that Dick has agreed to answer questions about his research into the assassination of JFK.

Please post your questions here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=4734

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it was first published Dick Russell's The Man Who Knew Too Much (Carroll & Graf, 1992) was hailed by Publisher's Weekly as "a masterpiece of historical reconstruction".

Daniel Brandt of Namebase has this to say about the book:

If the avalanche of reissued and rehashed JFK assassination books since Oliver Stone's movie has a downside, it's only because the one book that is possibly as significant as all the rest put together might get buried. After over a hundred interviews (including James Angleton and other CIA officials) and seventeen years of persistent research, Dick Russell has written such a book. While providing much new information on the intelligence connection, Russell doesn't offer any easy answers apart from the observation that organized crime alone could not have manipulated the physical evidence and the cover-up without substantial help.

Russell's treatment of the intelligence angle is comprehensive - Oswald in Japan, CIA in Mexico, military intelligence, mind-control, KGB, anti-Castro Cubans, H.L. Hunt et al. Simultaneously, his journalistic hook is an extended cat-and-mouse debriefing of Richard Case Nagell, an untalkative Oswald associate who contracted with U.S. intelligence and also had an arrangement with the Soviets; it still isn't clear who was pulling his strings. Nagell walked into an El Paso bank in September 1963 and fired two shots into the wall so that he would be in jail while "it" came down. "It" happened two months later, on November 22, 1963. If there is space on your shelf for only one JFK assassination book, make it this one.

The book was reissued in a revised, updated edition in 2003, coinciding with the 40th anniversary of the assassination.

I am pleased to announce that Dick has agreed to answer questions about his research into the assassination of JFK.

Please post your questions here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=4734

I would like to go no record as stating that I have both the original and updated versions of "The Man Who Knew Too Much," and I feel that they are essential to any serious JFK researchers collection. I would like to ask Mr. Russell about the tapes and photographs of Oswald, Nagell and Leopoldo and Angel that at one time were in a safe deposit box in Switzerland. Did Nagell ever recover those items before his death, or are they still in Switzerland, unrecoverable? Have you discovered any new "revelations" about the assassination. Is David Dinkins still alive? If so have you spoken with him recently? What is your opinion of the William Torbitt manuscript "Nomenclature of an Assassination cabal"? And finally are there any documents that have been de-classified by the ARRB that you would place a high priority on obtaining. Sincerely/Robert Howard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to go no record as stating that I have both the original and updated versions of "The Man Who Knew Too Much," and I feel that they are essential to any serious JFK researchers collection. I would like to ask Mr. Russell about the tapes and photographs of Oswald, Nagell and Leopoldo and Angel that at one time were in a safe deposit box in Switzerland. Did Nagell ever recover those items before his death, or are they still in Switzerland, unrecoverable? Have you discovered any new "revelations" about the assassination. Is David Dinkins still alive? If so have you spoken with him recently? What is your opinion of the William Torbitt manuscript "Nomenclature of an Assassination cabal"? And finally are there any documents that have been de-classified by the ARRB that you would place a high priority on obtaining. Sincerely/Robert Howard

Could you post this question here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=4734

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...