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Guest Stephen Turner

Cant help James, just a bump to keep it fresh in case any other researchers can. regards, Steve.

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I was wondering if anyone during their research has come across the name Yuriy Mostinsky?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

James

My only knowledge of a name along those lines, is of a Yura Mostinsky whose name pops up on pages 92-95 of 'Passport to Assassination' by Oleg Nechiporenko.

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I was wondering if anyone during their research has come across the name Yuriy Mostinsky?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

James

My only knowledge of a name along those lines, is of a Yura Mostinsky whose name pops up on pages 92-95 of 'Passport to Assassination' by Oleg Nechiporenko.

Thanks, Robert.

Can I ask who Yura Mostinsky is?

Cheers,

James

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I was wondering if anyone during their research has come across the name Yuriy Mostinsky?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

James

My only knowledge of a name along those lines, is of a Yura Mostinsky whose name pops up on pages 92-95 of 'Passport to Assassination' by Oleg Nechiporenko.

Thanks, Robert.

Can I ask who Yura Mostinsky is?

Cheers,

James

Summary of Passage from 'Passport to Assassination' concerning Yura Mostinsky

In the early 1960's the KGB's foreign C/I [counter-intelligence] unit, Service 2 occupied several offices in the famous building at Lubayaka Square. Workers called this building House 2 to distinguish it from KGB offices across the square. The Dept. of foreign C/I concerned itself with providing security to Sviet citizens and businesses located abroad. It watched over delegates, those on business trips, and the handful of tourist groups. The rare individuals who were on so-called private visits, at the invitation of their relatives, were more carefully monitored. This Division also was concerned with those people entering the country. Material from Soviet Embassies and residences were sent to Service 2. Documents from tourists wishing to visit relatives or return permanently to the Soviet Union were processed here and at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs......Service 2 was also involved in the penetration of American intelligence. In the world of C/I thereis a sacred law: to ensure your own safety, you must have sources of information on the enemy side. Operating out of rezidentura is one of the most effective means of penetrating foreign intelligence operations.

Here C/I operatives work in enemy territory underconsular cover, they perform two basic functions: infiltrating American intelligence and protecting their own people and so-called clean, non-espionage Soviet citizens from being seduced.....

A colleague and close friend, Yura Mosintsky, began his career at Service 2 in the 1960's. Yura was a novice at the time but became involved in this exiciting aspect of C/I....Service 2 was the training ground for working as a rezidentura operative. Yura and other operatives were supervised by their more experienced colleagues, especially those who had handled the same assignment.....

Sometime in the late summer of 1963, a pile of these documents [entrance/exit visas and documents concerning same, and documents of foreign tourists] arrived at his desk......the section head called him into to discuss one of the documents, called Prusakova/Oswald.

The head of Yura's section, Pavel Aleksandrovich........told Yura, "This is a special case. It involves a Marina Prusakova asking to return to her relatives in Leningrad. But her husband's an American; she married him in Minsk and left for America a year ago. He was a former Marine who came here as a tourist and didn't want to leave. Over a year ago they asked us about his return to America, and we said he was of no interest to us. This appears to be a second request to return here. Clarify the situation in Leningrad; let me know what you think....Yura carefully read the file, which stated that Marina Prusakova had a stepfather and other relatives in Leningrad. Together with her husband, Lee Harvey Oswald, she requested permission to return to Leningrad permanently. The trip was planned for November-December 1963.

I met with Yura in the spring of 1992, and he told me about his involvement with the Oswalds. END

Robert: Basically Yura handled the inquiry by consulting Marina Prusakova's file, and then contacted the KGB's Leningrad office to utilize the OVIR office to ascertain whether Marina's relatives would allow Marina and Lee to stay with them. SOP according to Yura. He additionally notified the Belorussian KGB of Marina's request, since Oswald had resided in Minsk. [The local authorities apparently learned that Marina's stepfather had no interest in taking them in]. He [Marina's stepfather] characterized Marina as a woman of loose morals. In his words, Marina's main goal was to marry a foreigner and leave the country with him. Yura goes on to say that 'Intelligence had no interest in Oswald and his wife, and that if there had been [the information] would have come through Section 2. So, based on the information Yura acquired, he suggested that it was inadvisable to allow the Oswalds to return in the current year. He presented a draft to Pavel, who edited it slightly, signed off and sent the document to the Consular Division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs......

Then a rather strange thing happened, according to Yura the Chairman of the KGB's Belorussian office granted permission. He say's that "It's entirely possible Minsk was already informed the answer was no," But "It was too late to stop the process."

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