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Curb Appeal


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Can the joint of a curb change angles in one frame, if at all?

Or, is this a result of multiple layers?

Do the legs in the background sync with the angle movement of the joint?

Was the exclusion of frame 341 by MPI, intentional or an honest mistake?

thanks

chris

P.S. A Reposted response from a Tom Purvis topic.

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7 consecutive frames from a movie.

Motion blur among them.

Far more movement than the 2 consecutive Z frames.

No angle change in this expansion joint.

chris

Chris you don't have anywhere near the camera movement during exposure as the z film. What was your shutter speed in your test?

Now go back and look at the zframes again and compare the highlight in front of Jackies face in the two frames. It makes the same angle change as the curb stripe. Everything blurs to the same extent and changes angles just like the curb. Its motion blur.

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7 consecutive frames from a movie.

Motion blur among them.

Far more movement than the 2 consecutive Z frames.

No angle change in this expansion joint.

chris

Chris you don't have anywhere near the camera movement during exposure as the z film. What was your shutter speed in your test?

Now go back and look at the zframes again and compare the highlight in front of Jackies face in the two frames. It makes the same angle change as the curb stripe. Everything blurs to the same extent and changes angles just like the curb. Its motion blur.

Craig,

A composite of the Zframes. Red lines indicating the angle formed by curb joint.

Also shows angle Jackie's white gloves form near her face, and camera movement between the two frames.

A composite of the camera movement in my film. (7 frames)

I shot my curb sequence with a digital Sony DSC-W1.

In movie mode at 30FPS.

Shutter speed set at NR30. Which is noise reduction at 30 seconds.

Any shutter speed slower than 1/6 second has the NR setting for automatic slow shutter function.

chris

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7 consecutive frames from a movie.

Motion blur among them.

Far more movement than the 2 consecutive Z frames.

No angle change in this expansion joint.

chris

Chris you don't have anywhere near the camera movement during exposure as the z film. What was your shutter speed in your test?

Now go back and look at the zframes again and compare the highlight in front of Jackies face in the two frames. It makes the same angle change as the curb stripe. Everything blurs to the same extent and changes angles just like the curb. Its motion blur.

Craig,

A composite of the Zframes. Red lines indicating the angle formed by curb joint.

Also shows angle Jackie's white gloves form near her face, and camera movement between the two frames.

A composite of the camera movement in my film. (7 frames)

I shot my curb sequence with a digital Sony DSC-W1.

In movie mode at 30FPS.

Shutter speed set at NR30. Which is noise reduction at 30 seconds.

Any shutter speed slower than 1/6 second has the NR setting for automatic slow shutter function.

chris

Whats your point Chris? Your digital frames dont show enough movement to tell us anything, at least not conpared to the z frames. The z fromes show motion blur that appears consistant in all parts of the image including the curb joint. So whats the problem again?

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I sent Chris's study to John Costella for his opinion.

He did a quick vector analysis of this and adjacent frames, and assures

me that the leaning curb mark appears in other frames and is consistent

with panning blur of the background.

These factors make understanding Z blurs difficult:

...panning movement of camera (blurs background)

...movement car (blurs car and occupants)

...vertical jiggle of camera (makes erratic blurs)

...combinations of the above (makes complex blurs)

Costella made a year-long study of Z-blurs and found that the blurs

were manipulated with almost mathematical precision...WITH A FEW

EXCEPTIONS which he has previously described. He reiterates his view

that the background grass is from a separate film than the foreground,

joined at the straight curbline.

I must defer to John's superior expertise, though I still do not quite

visualize how a scanning blur makes the line SLANT instead of

just a horizontal blurring.

Jack

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Whats your point Chris? Your digital frames dont show enough movement to tell us anything, at least not conpared to the z frames. The z fromes show motion blur that appears consistant in all parts of the image including the curb joint. So whats the problem again?

They do not get it, Craig. motion blur, panning blur ... they just look at you with a blank stare on their face.

Bill

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7 consecutive frames from a movie.

Motion blur among them.

Far more movement than the 2 consecutive Z frames.

No angle change in this expansion joint.

chris

Chris you don't have anywhere near the camera movement during exposure as the z film. What was your shutter speed in your test?

Now go back and look at the zframes again and compare the highlight in front of Jackies face in the two frames. It makes the same angle change as the curb stripe. Everything blurs to the same extent and changes angles just like the curb. Its motion blur.

Craig,

A composite of the Zframes. Red lines indicating the angle formed by curb joint.

Also shows angle Jackie's white gloves form near her face, and camera movement between the two frames.

A composite of the camera movement in my film. (7 frames)

I shot my curb sequence with a digital Sony DSC-W1.

In movie mode at 30FPS.

Shutter speed set at NR30. Which is noise reduction at 30 seconds.

Any shutter speed slower than 1/6 second has the NR setting for automatic slow shutter function.

chris

BTW, a thumbs up to you for getting out and testing.

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I sent Chris's study to John Costella for his opinion.

He did a quick vector analysis of this and adjacent frames, and assures

me that the leaning curb mark appears in other frames and is consistent

with panning blur of the background.

These factors make understanding Z blurs difficult:

...panning movement of camera (blurs background)

...movement car (blurs car and occupants)

...vertical jiggle of camera (makes erratic blurs)

...combinations of the above (makes complex blurs)

Costella made a year-long study of Z-blurs and found that the blurs

were manipulated with almost mathematical precision...WITH A FEW

EXCEPTIONS which he has previously described. He reiterates his view

that the background grass is from a separate film than the foreground,

joined at the straight curbline.

I must defer to John's superior expertise, though I still do not quite

visualize how a scanning blur makes the line SLANT instead of

just a horizontal blurring.

Jack

Next post if you may.

Edited by Chris Davidson
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I sent Chris's study to John Costella for his opinion.

He did a quick vector analysis of this and adjacent frames, and assures

me that the leaning curb mark appears in other frames and is consistent

with panning blur of the background.

These factors make understanding Z blurs difficult:

...panning movement of camera (blurs background)

...movement car (blurs car and occupants)

...vertical jiggle of camera (makes erratic blurs)

...combinations of the above (makes complex blurs)

Costella made a year-long study of Z-blurs and found that the blurs

were manipulated with almost mathematical precision...WITH A FEW

EXCEPTIONS which he has previously described. He reiterates his view

that the background grass is from a separate film than the foreground,

joined at the straight curbline.

I must defer to John's superior expertise, though I still do not quite

visualize how a scanning blur makes the line SLANT instead of

just a horizontal blurring.

Jack

Jack,

Thanks for sending that to John.

Since John ran a vector analysis on those previous frames, I guess we could treat the CURB as a vector.

Watch the shadow angle of Altgen's feet, change on the curb.

With the camera movement involved between these two frames, why doesn't the CURB move in accordance?

As John stated, I too believe the background and foreground are on different layers.

chris

Edited by Chris Davidson
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I sent Chris's study to John Costella for his opinion.

He did a quick vector analysis of this and adjacent frames, and assures

me that the leaning curb mark appears in other frames and is consistent

with panning blur of the background.

These factors make understanding Z blurs difficult:

...panning movement of camera (blurs background)

...movement car (blurs car and occupants)

...vertical jiggle of camera (makes erratic blurs)

...combinations of the above (makes complex blurs)

Costella made a year-long study of Z-blurs and found that the blurs

were manipulated with almost mathematical precision...WITH A FEW

EXCEPTIONS which he has previously described. He reiterates his view

that the background grass is from a separate film than the foreground,

joined at the straight curbline.

I must defer to John's superior expertise, though I still do not quite

visualize how a scanning blur makes the line SLANT instead of

just a horizontal blurring.

Jack

Jack,

Thanks for sending that to John.

Since John ran a vector analysis on those previous frames, I guess we could treat the CURB as a vector.

Watch the shadow angle of Altgen's feet, change on the curb.

With the camera movement involved between these two frames, why doesn't the CURB move in accordance?

As John stated, I too believe the background and foreground are on different layers.

chris

Just curious Chris, exactly how do you think the curb SHOULD look based on the amount and direction of the blur?

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