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The Mongoose Deception


Tim Gratz
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In case you are wondering, Dr. Greer is no relation to the Greer that shot JFK.

No Tim, we weren't really wondering at all.

I'm just wondering why all these Bozos have to write fiction at all, when the real story is even more incredible.

I have to read no further after this blurb:

""In unraveling America's most important twentieth-century political crime, CJ enlists the aid of his always-faithful cadre of street-smart former rodeo cowboys; his insightful former secretary, Julie Madrid, now a top-ranked legal shark; and his partner, Flore Jean Benson, a former U.S. Marines intelligence operative, to solve the most compelling murder case ever to capture the American imagination. CJ puts his own life on the line as he travels the potentially lethal trail that may lead to the identity of the killer, and to the one person living who actually knows the entire story about who killed JFK."

I thought the always-faithful cadre of street-smart former rodeo cowboys were with the good guys.

BK

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I take offense that you call a man with far more educational and vocational credits than you a "bozo".

Sorry Gratz,

Bill is correct by calling you a Bozo for the claim that Greer made the fatal head shot. A shout out to the Greer family... sorry this man is incorrect, please forgive him!!

Don

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Don, anyone who has followed this discussion knows where I stand on the ridiculous proposition that Bill Greer shot JFK. BK knows that. I was of course being facetious/sarcastic for the few (one?) Forum member who asserts that Greer shot JFK.

And Bill's reference to "Bozos" was clearly refering to persons who write fictional accounts of the assassination. Read it again if you must.

Dr. Greer is both a doctor and a prolific writer. It is insulting for anyone to call him a "Bozo".

My point stands.

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Don, anyone who has followed this discussion knows where I stand on the ridiculous proposition that Bill Greer shot JFK. BK knows that. I was of course being facetious/sarcastic for the few (one?) Forum member who asserts that Greer shot JFK.

And Bill's reference to "Bozos" was clearly refering to persons who write fictional accounts of the assassination. Read it again if you must.

Dr. Greer is both a doctor and a prolific writer. It is insulting for anyone to call him a "Bozo".

My point stands.

And Bugliosi is a lawyer as well as a bozo. You can have all sorts of "credentials" and still be

none too bright on this case. Or a disinfo agent: Think Posner.

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I take offense that you call a man with far more educational and vocational credits than you a "bozo".

Excuse me Tim,

You're the Bozo.

Forget far more educational and vocational credits.

I said and say again, that anybody who writes a fictional account of the JFK assassination is a Bozo because the real story is more fascinating than anything you can possibly make up.

Though it would be beneficial to get the always-faithful cadre of street-smart former rodeo cowboys on the case.

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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I take offense that you call a man with far more educational and vocational credits than you a "bozo".

Excuse me Tim,

You're the Bozo.

Forget far more educational and vocational credits.

I said and say again, that anybody who writes a fictional account of the JFK assassination is a Bozo because the real story is more fascinating than anything you can possibly make up.

Though it would be beneficial to get the always-faithful cadre of street-smart former rodeo cowboys on the case.

How Bozo is that?

BK

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Bill,

Here's the problem with your point of view: Oliver Stone's cinematic fiction JFK led to the ARRB.

In other words, it accomplished what 30-plus years of academic research could not bring about.

Art alone has the power to stir the heart, to provoke the emotions absent which intellectual discourse cannot reach the human soul.

John Le Carre was asked why he never addressed the Kennedy assassination in a novel.

"It's too difficult," he is said to have responded.

Maybe for Mr. Cornwell.

This being said, every JFK assassination-related novel I've read to date (and I don't include Delillo's Libra in that category) is either junk literature or stretched past the breaking point (McCarry's The Tears of Autumn).

But we're not done.

Charles

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Bill,

Here's the problem with your point of view: Oliver Stone's cinematic fiction JFK led to the ARRB.

In other words, it accomplished what 30-plus years of academic research could not bring about.

Art alone has the power to stir the heart, to provoke the emotions absent which intellectual discourse cannot reach the human soul....

....This being said, every JFK assassination-related novel I've read to date (and I don't include Delillo's Libra in that category) is either junk literature or stretched past the breaking point (McCarry's The Tears of Autumn).

But we're not done.

The Innocent Man Script by T Mack Durham was published in 2000. I happened to become acquainted with T Mack and I know he researched Kennedy's murder extensively and thoughtfully while writing his novel. T Mack Durham is not a bozo by any stretch of the imagination.

While Durham's novel will not have any influence on convening a grand jury or getting Congress to release records, The Innocent Man Script is a well-written and worthwhile endeavor in my opinion.

http://www.amazon.com/Innocent-Man-Script-...e/dp/0595100139

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Bill,

Here's the problem with your point of view: Oliver Stone's cinematic fiction JFK led to the ARRB.

In other words, it accomplished what 30-plus years of academic research could not bring about.

Art alone has the power to stir the heart, to provoke the emotions absent which intellectual discourse cannot reach the human soul....

....This being said, every JFK assassination-related novel I've read to date (and I don't include Delillo's Libra in that category) is either junk literature or stretched past the breaking point (McCarry's The Tears of Autumn).

But we're not done.

The Innocent Man Script by T Mack Durham was published in 2000. I happened to become acquainted with T Mack and I know he researched Kennedy's murder extensively and thoughtfully while writing his novel. T Mack Durham is not a bozo by any stretch of the imagination.

While Durham's novel will not have any influence on convening a grand jury or getting Congress to release records, The Innocent Man Script is a well-written and worthwhile endeavor in my opinion.

http://www.amazon.com/Innocent-Man-Script-...e/dp/0595100139

Michael, and Tim,

A bozo is only a clown, and withdraw the charge that all JFK assassination fiction writers are bozos, because that is not the case, maybe only those who include the street-smart rodeo cowboys. I'd like to see a picture of them.

I also understand the need for some writers, like Robert Tannenbaum, of the need to fictionalize names and disguise situations that are derived from real people and events you encountered as a cop.

Writers of non-fiction don't have the luxury of being able to invent characters and contrive conversations, but they should, like the American New Journalism (Talese, Capote, Wolf, Thompson, et al) and use techniques of the fiction writer to make the story interesting.

And JFK was a drama based on two non-fictional books.

Now Bugliosi's "non-fictional" book on JFK will be dramatized, ala Stone's movie, and we will have to see how many liberties the screenwriters take with the facts.

And I appologize to all the Bozos out there who were insulted by my associating them with TG.

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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And JFK was a drama based on two non-fictional books.

Now Bugliosi's "non-fictional" book on JFK will be dramatized, ala Stone's movie, and we will have to see how many liberties the screenwriters take with the facts.

And I appologize to all the Bozos out there who were insulted by my associating them with TG.

BK

Bill,

JFK was indeed informed by Jim Garrison's and Jim Marr's respective non-fiction volumes. But in the final analysis it was fiction, replete with composite characters, wholly imagined scenes, plots and sub-plots, sub-texts, story arcs, character development, and all the other elements of drama.

Bugliosi's book purports to report facts, but is in fact concocted of untruths.

Now we must bear in mind the critical distinction between untruth and fiction.

The screenwriters will take not a single liberty with the facts for the simple reason that the story they would dramatize is fact-free. I'm still unclear as to the format of the mini-series. Will it be a drama or a documentary? Will an actor portray the noble Bug as he bravely pursues the truth? Or will what we see more closely resemble, say, Ken Burn's upcoming War?

Make no mistake: The killers of Kennedy fully understand the unique powers of art to set fire to our imaginations and, by extension, manipulate the masses over the long haul. In the Bug mini-series they are consciously attempting to create an anti-JFK. Remember, it's all about balance. It's all about the illusion of a level playing field on which the conspiracy/LN "debate" may be continued ad infinitum (nauseam?)

A generation or three from now, when someone trots out Stone's film, a xxxx or a dupe will counter with the Bug B.S. And the point will be, "See, honorable, informed people can disagree."

Yet we know that, in terms of the conspiracy/LN issue, honorable, informed people cannot disagree with the truth of conspiracy and maintain their honor.

I repeat: Bear in mind the critical distinction between untruth and fiction.

And by the way, I prefer "Clarabelle."

Edited by Charles Drago
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And by the way, I prefer "Clarabelle."

"Goodbye, kids......"

From Wikipedia:

The final episode aired on September 24, 1960, entitled "Clarabell's Big Surprise". The episode was mostly a fond look back at all the highlights of the show's past. Meanwhile, in the midst of it all, Clarabell has what he calls "a big surprise". The rest of the cast attempt to find out the surprise throughout the entire show, with only Mayor Phineas T. Bluster succeeding, and promising to keep it a secret. ("But," he says upon leaving, "it won't be very easy to keep something like this a secret for long!!") Finally, in the closing moments, the surprise was disclosed through pantomime to Buffalo Bob and Howdy Doody. "You mean...you can talk??" said Bob. "Why, golly...I don't believe it!" Howdy Doody exclaimed. "You can talk?!" Bob asked again. Clarabell nodded. "Well, Clarabell", Bob continued, gently shaking the clown's shoulders, "this is your last chance! If you really can talk, prove it...let's hear you say something!" A drumroll began as Clarabell faced the camera as it came in for an extreme closeup. His lips quivered as the drumroll continued. When it stopped, Clarabell simply said softly "Goodbye, kids", and the picture faded to black. Lew Anderson's (Clarabell's) genuine tears upon delivering the only line Clarabell ever spoke in 13 years, made this one of the most poignant moments in television history. The recently discovered and restored color videotape of the final broadcast is now available commercially.

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Bill wrote:

And I appologize to all the Bozos out there who were insulted by my associating them with TG.

Bill, your apparent need to insult (first Dr. Greer, then me) is simply an indication of the level of your intelligence.

AND--you either do not know how to spell or you are too lazy to check your posts for spelling errors.

Edited by Tim Gratz
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