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Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark: A Life of Service


Guest Tom Scully
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Question and Answers for Tom Scully......

Tom, I believe you know me well enough that you realize that I believe this thread contains a lot of facts that are much more

than "interesting."

On that note, and with a specific area in mind.....you do know about Mrs John L. (Carol) Hughes right?

Diagram of Second Floor of TSBD

also Carol Hughes (Not on Westphal memo)

Warren Commission 6:339; 22:654

http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=486040

excerpts of Warren Commission testimony of Geneva L. Hine

Mr. Ball.

On the 22nd of November 1963, did you know that there was to be a motorcade or parade come by your building?

Miss HINE. Oh, yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

How did 'you find that out?

Miss HINE. Sir, I don't remember. I probably heard over the news but I cannot remember.

Mr. Ball.

You were just aware of the fact?

Miss HINE. Yes; I knew it and the girls were discussing it in the office that morning. Many of them, probably six, had not seen the President close. You see, I had seen him on two different occasions and I had been very close to him and so they were lamenting that they couldn't go out so I spoke up and said "I will be glad to answer the telephone so you girls may go out and see the motorcade" and I bad previously answered the telephone when we were in the other building before we moved in this building, so they were delighted and I thought nothing about it.

Mr. Ball.

Did they all go out?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; everyone went out.

Mr. BALL. Was there anyone left in the office part of the building on that second floor office?

Miss HINE. Only Mr. [Otis] Williams and myself and he stayed with me because he was working on his desk until he thought that the motorcade was about there.

Mr. Ball.

How many [shots] did you hear?

Miss HINE. Three.

Mr. Ball.

Could you tell where the shots were coming from?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; they came from inside the building.

Mr. Ball.

How do you know that?

Miss HINE. Because the building vibrated from the result of the explosion coming in.

Mr. Ball.

It appeared to you that the shots came from the building?

Mr. Ball.

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

Did you know they were shots at the time?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; they sounded almost like cannon shots they were so terrific.

Mr. Ball.

That is when you were at the window, is that right?

Miss HINE Yes, sir; that is when I was at the window, because the next car, you see, was coming up and turning and I looked. Of course I looked when I heard the shots. I just stood there and saw people running to the east up Elm Street. I saw people running; I saw people falling down, you know,

lying down on the sidewalk.

Mr. Ball.

That was on Houston Street?

Miss HINE. No, sir; Elm.

Mr. Ball.

You could see could you see any part of Elm?

Miss HINE. East, yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

You could see east on Elm?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; I could see east on Elm. I saw them run across east on Elm away from where his car had gone and my first thought was if I could only see what happened, so I went out our front door into the foyer.

Mr. Ball.

You mean the front door to the office?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

That opens on---

Miss HINE. The foyer, little hall, and---

Mr. Ball.

Steps lead down?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; but there is a door before the steps and the elevator is to my left and I went past the hall that goes to my right and I knocked on the door of Lyons and Carnahan; that's a publishing company.

Mr. Ball.

What did you do then?

Miss HINE. I tried the door, sir, and it was locked and I couldn't get in and I called, "Me, please let me in," because she's the girl that had that office, Mrs. Lee Watley, and she didn't answer. I don't know if she was there or not, then I left her door. I retraced my steps back to where the hall turns to my left and went down it to Southwestern Publishing Co.'s door and I tried their door and the reason for this was because those windows face out.

Mr. Ball.

On to Elm?

Miss HINE. Yes; and on to the triple underpass.

Mr. Ball.

I See.

Miss HINE. And there was a girl in there talking on the telephone and I could hear her but she didn't answer the door.

Mr. Ball.

Was the door locked?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

That was which company?

Miss HINE. Southwestern Publishing Co.

Mr. Ball.

Did you call to her?

Miss HINE. I called and called and shook the door and she didn't answer me because she was talking on the telephone; I could hear her. They have a little curtain up and I could see her form through the curtains. I could see her talking and I knew that's what she was doing and then I turned and went through the back hall and came through the back door.

Mr. Ball.

Of your office, the second floor office?

Miss HINE. Yes; and I went straight up to the desk because the telephones were beginning to wink; outside calls were beginning to come in.

Mr. Ball.

Did they come in rapidly?

Miss HINE They did come in rapidly.

Mr. Ball.

When you came back in did you see Mrs. Reid?

Miss HINE. No, sir; I don't believe there was a soul in the office when I came back in right then.

END

Room 203 is listed in a JFK Document as, apparently shared between

Gloria Calvery

Karan Hicks...related to DPD J.B. Hicks, 4318 Matilda who worked under Lt. Day, or Jim Hicks who testified at the Shaw trial

and wound up incarcerated at a mental hospital?

Carol Hughes

Carol Reed

Karen Westbrook...related to DPD Captain W.R. Westbrook?

see

http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=993276

only WC/FBI contact with Mrs. John L. "Carol" Hughes

I, Mrs. John L. [Carol] Hughes make the following voluntary statement to Alfred D. Neely who has identified himself as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. I am of the Caucasian race, 27 years of age and reside at 510 Glenfield Street, Garland, Texas. I am employed by the South-Western Publishing Co., Room 203 Texas School Book Depository, 411 Elm Street, Dallas, Texas. On November 22, 1963, I went to south window near my desk to watch the Presidential Motorcade passing along at Houston and Elm Streets. I was standing looking out this window when President John F. Kennedy was shot. I was alone in the office as all the other people had gone to the street to watch the Motorcade pass. I did not see Lee Harvey Oswald at that time. I do not know Oswald but I had seen him in the building several times prior to this day. I do not recall seeing any strangers in the building on November 22, 1963. I remained in my office until about 1:30 P.M. when I left for the day and went home.

END

Not surprisingly, Carol Hughes' appearances in Warren Commission documents and interviews

is not exactly "all over the place;" why would that be?

In all fairness, non-coincidence theorists might say "the trauma of literally having watched

President Kennedy's assassination has different effects on different people, it's not

out of the realm of possibility she got on the phone to insulate herself from the trauma

of what she had just witnessed." But personally, I find the lack of investigation into this area

of what took place in the Depository on November 22, 1963 to be very suspicious and

disturbing, and am willing to risk some degree of ridicule in saying so.

I did some digging and discovered what strongly appears to be a discrepancy in the Warren Commission documents, unless Mr and Mrs John L. Hughes decided to move four houses down from where they lived sometime in 1963......

FYI: Garland is a suburb in the same manner that Irving or Arlington are

1964 Dallas Residential White Pages Listings

page 24 Garland suburban section at back

John L Hughes 502 Glenfield Dr BR8-0789

John L Hughes Jr., 502 Glenfield Dr BR8-9744

I also have an obituary collection that has over eighty or so names, I have been unable to find anything

about Mr and Mrs. John and Carol Hughes......of course, I also do not have a subscription

to newspaperarchive.com

Have you ever seen a Carol Hughes referenced in relation to Maury Hughes, Howard Hughes or anyone else?

Stabs in the dark.....

Dallas Morning News, The (TX) - April 25, 1985

Deceased Name: JUDGE SARAH T . HUGHES DIES

Colleagues recall her spunk, grit

The life of retired U.S. District Judge Sarah Tilghman Hughes, who died Tuesday at age 88, perhaps is best capsulized by a phrase usually reserved for swaggering, self-assured men lawyers.

"She could strut sittin' down,' U.S. District Judge Robert Hill said of his longtime colleague.

The tiny woman lawyer from Baltimore kicked Dallas in the shins 40 years ago, got the attention of the Democratic power brokers and became a legislator, state district judge and, finally, in 1961, a federal judge. She was an advocate of women's rights before the cause caught fire and was on the three-judge federal panel that struck down the Texas law banning abortion.

"I've always said that she was the most independent individual -- notice I said individual, not woman -- that I ever met in my life,' Hill said. "She didn't lean on anyone; she was a free thinker and would never compromise her beliefs.'

She was, in the words of U.S. District Judge Barefoot Sanders, the embodiment of "pure determination.' Even in her 80s, she awoke at dawn and adhered to a strict regimen of exercise, diet, even yoga.

Judge Hughes died of heart failure at 9:30 p.m. at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, said her nurse and friend Betty Cadwell, who was at her side when she died. She had suffered a stroke May 7, 1982, and was thought to be close to death then, Mrs. Cadwell said. But she recuperated and had lived in The Meadowgreen nursing home for much of the last three years.

She was hospitalized again Feb. 12 after having a series of "mini-strokes,' Mrs. Cadwell said. Services are scheduled at 11 a.m. Friday at St. Matthews Cathedral, 5100 Ross Ave. Her husband, George Hughes, died in 1964, and she had no immediate survivors.

As a federal judge, she was involved in several historic cases, but the brief moment of Nov. 22, 1963, when she stood aboard Air Force One at Love Field and administered the presidential oath of office to Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy is forever etched in the public's memory.

She once told one of her law clerks, Joanne Hurtekant: "You know that (the oath to Johnson) is not really what I consider to be the brightest point of my career.'

She considered the Sharpstown Bank scandal case of 1971 and her involvement in the improvement of conditions in the Dallas County Jail system of far more significance, Ms. Hurtekant said. And she became a model for women who wanted to enter the law profession.

Maura McNiel, a woman's advocate, called Judge Hughes "a formidable force in the women's movement.'

When she sat on the bench, she wore the traditional black robe, but in a touch of femininity that few people noticed she had embroidered a tiny red rose on the front of the robe.

She was not a soft touch in the courtroom, however, and, in fact, had the reputation of being unusually harsh on white-collar criminals, said Dan Weiser, a Dallas political consultant who knew her well.

The high-powered defense and government attorneys in the civil trial of Frank W. Sharp and former Texas Attorney General Waggoner Carr for stock fraud in the Sharpstown scandal did not intimidate her. She lashed out at them in court for dragging out the testimony.

"Some lawyers like to talk just to hear themselves talk,' she told the attorneys. "Now let's move along.'

Weiser said she stood up for what she believed.

"She was really a moral force as much as a legal force in Dallas,' Weiser said. "It was never go-along-to-get-along. Government she believed was for the powerless and the poor. She was very sympathetic to the poor but would often give jail time to white-collar criminals.'

Her forthrightness in the courtroom may have shocked the more traditional jurists, but her candor with people came naturally, her colleagues said. In one case she heard seven years ago, a woman defendant pleaded guilty and stood before her for sentencing. Judge Hughes, who had found out the young woman already had seven children, implored the woman not to have any more children and even made that a condition of the woman's probation.

The judge then turned to an already bewildered probation officer and said: "And you see that she doesn't get pregnant.'

When Mrs. Hughes was nominated to fill an unexpired term as the Dallas County 14th District Court judge in 1935, one state senator from Dallas who opposed her confirmation commented that "she ought to be home washing dishes.'

She snapped back that the senator would not have been elected "if his charming wife had been home washing dishes instead of campaigning for him.'

She got national press coverage from that exchange by having her photo taken wearing an apron and standing at her own kitchen sink in Highland Park.

As a state representative from Dallas from 1931 to 1935 and during the years she sat as a state and federal judge, she was always outspoken.

"She exemplified and believed in having the utmost candor,' Judge Sanders said. "She was totally without guile.'

City of Dallas officials criticized her for saying in a 1964 speech that she believed accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald chose Dallas for the assassination of President Kennedy, who appointed her, at age 65, to the federal bench, because of "a climate of hate in Dallas that was not evident in any other place.'

During her early state court days, she was a leader in giving Texas women the right to sit on juries. She once answered the charge that women were too emotional for jury duty by saying: "Many times I've wished I had a woman on a jury in my court as I watched moon-eyed, gullible men swallow the story of a pretty female witness.'

U.S. Rep. Martin Frost, who served as her clerk in 1970, said he believes that Mrs. Hughes, not Sandra Day O'Connor, could have become the first woman U.S. Supreme Court justice had she been born a few years later.

"She had just a magnificent legal mind. She was rarely overruled at the appellate level and was considered fair and impartial by all the lawyers who appeared before her,' Frost said.

"She made law in several very significant areas, including the right of women to have an abortion in the Roe versus Wade case. And that has been upheld by the Supreme Court.'

She never shrank from a controversial issue, he said. Her harsh criticism of the Dallas County Commissioners Court for lagging on her massive 1972 ruling to upgrade facilities and treatment programs for Dallas County jail inmates angered many in Dallas.

But she did not back down and ordered the jail closed to new inmates in 1977 until the commissioners showed her a location and plans for a new jail -- which they did just before the deadline she had set.

The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in August 1979 ruled that Judge Hughes had done a good job on the jail reform but ordered her to dismiss the case as finished, voiding her May 1977 ruling.

"I did a great deal of work on the jail, and I had hoped to do more . . . I did as much as I could under the circumstances,' she said.

She was born Aug. 2, 1896, in Baltimore, and attended Goucher College, a women's college in Maryland, on an academic scholarship. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a major in zoology and a minor in mathematics.

After graduation, she taught zoology and math in high school for two years, then enrolled in night classes at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

She worked her way through the university's law school as a policewoman in Washington and graduated in 1922. She married George Ernest Hughes -- a Palestine, Texas, native and law school classmate -- that same year. The couple, who had no children, moved to Dallas and opened a law partnership.

Mrs. Hughes won a seat in the Texas House the first time out in 1930 and held it for four years.

"I'm a good campaigner,' she said in 1981. "When I ran the first time, I visited every small town in my district, every fire station three times because there were three shifts of men working. I went wherever there was a vote. And I only spent $300 for the whole campaign.'

She was re-elected to her state district court seat seven times. A lifelong Democrat, the 5-foot judge was described in one news story during the 1940s as "a diminutive bundle of Roosevelt liberalism.'

In 1952, while president of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Judge Hughes was nominated as the vice presidential candidate of the Democratic Party by federation members. She withdrew immediately, feeling the point had been made that women could get that far. In her early political life, she allied herself with influential House Speaker Sam Rayburn of Bonham, Texas, and U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough of Texas.

When she was nominated to the federal bench by President Kennedy, there was as much opposition to her because of her age -- 65 -- as there was to her liberal views. But the U.S. Senate's confirmation sailed through with the backing of Johnson.

Even while on the federal bench she continued to attend partisan political events -- which to her meant liberal, Democratic meetings -- raising eyebrows. But an attitude of "that's Sarah' eventually made it a non-issue.

And she could always be found supporting women's causes, having stepped out front for feminism long before it achieved widespread support in the 1970s.

In 1975, she retired from trial work to senior judge status at the age of 79 but continued to work on cases, including the Dallas County-jail suit. She presided over much of the three-year federal grand jury investigation of bribery-kickback allegations against the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, and the investigation of charges that a former Frito-Lay executive tried to corner the peanut oil market.

She was also involved in a 1978 federal trial of a Richardson "tax protester,' during which she received threats against her life.

In August 1981, Judge Hughes stepped down from the trial bench because of an eye disease, but continued arraignments, sentencing and probation revocations. She retired entirely in 1982.

In September 1982, she was the recipient of a Dallas Historical Society Excellence in Community Services award for law and law enforcement. She also has been honored by the Women's Center of Dallas, an organization she helped get started.

Even while in failing health the past three years, she continued to stay abreast of current issues, said Mrs. Cadwell, her personal nurse.

"She loved to have us read political biographies to her. We would read four hours a day,' Mrs. Cadwell said. "Never once in those three years that she was ill did I ever hear her complain or express any regrets about her life.'

Family members, including a niece and a nephew, have requested that those wishing to make donations send them to the Sarah T. Hughes Scholarship Fund for Southern Methodist University law students in care of the Dallas Bar Foundation, 2101 Ross Ave.

Robert: another obituary mentioned they had no children.

end

AmericanMafia.com - Feature Articles 208

americanmafia.com/Feature_Articles_208.html

But, what Ricca needed Dillon for was his close, personnel relationship with President Harry Truman. In 1934, at the personnel request of Missouri crime king, Boss Pendergast, Dillon had acted as Harry Truman campaign manager in his race for the senate. Dillon had also worked as a lawyer for Boss Pendergast, and represented Pendergasts's chief lieutenant, "Smiling Johnny" Lazia, on an income tax fraud charge.

Dillon loved the power, the money and the clout working with these clients gave him. He bragged, often and loudly, that he could visit Truman at the White House whenever he wanted to.

In October of 1945, Dillon met "Putty Nose" Brady, who had ties to the Chicago outfit that went back to the Capone organization. With Brady at the meeting was an ex-prizefighter, and occasional Brady business partner, James Testa. Dillon, according to Testa, provided them with a price list with a set amount of money he would need to have each of the Chicago hoods released by using his influence in Washington with the Truman White House.

While Dillon was collecting his bribe money from Testa and Brady, another lawyer named Maury Hughes of Dallas, traveled to Washington and met with Attorney General Clark. The two men had grown up together. Shortly after the meeting, the Attorney General requested the gangsters transfer to Leavenworth.

For decades no one in law enforcement was clear on what hand Clark had played in the transfer or where Hughes fit in until Murray Humphreys summed it all up when he, knowingly or unknowingly, told an FBI microphone on October 16, 1964: "Attorney General Tom Clarke was, he always was, 100% for doing favors . . . the guy Maury Hughes who went to Clarke was an ex law partner (from Dallas) and then the scandal broke."

Humphreys also said that another lawyer they hired, Bradley Eben, was paid the astounding fee of $15,000, an enormous amount of money in 1945, to "consult" on the case. Eben's mother was a Truman White House employee who worked as a liaison between Attorney General Clarke and the President.

MFF BIO'S

HUGHES, CAROL (MRS. JOHN L.)

Sources: WC Vol 22, p. 654; CE 1381; CD 706ff

Mary's

Comments: Employee of Southwestern Publishing Co. Watching motorcade from second floor of TSBD and witnessed assassination.

HUGHES, EDDIE S.

Sources: Information sheet for Journalism Symposium at SMU 11/20/63

Mary's

Comments: A journalist with Dallas Morning News who covered the assassination.

HUGHES, PAUL J.

Sources: CIA 385-736, p. 4; Miami Herald, May 27, 1960; Parade Magazine, 4/12/64

Mary's

Comments: American soldier of fortune. Arrested 7/1/59 in Havana's Biltmore suburb. Said to be officer in Castro's rebel army. A pilot placed on "blacklist" by U.S. Government. Deceased.

Comments on this Selection

disappeared

by chc5000 on Wed, Jan 18, 2006, 11:10 PM GMT (#1382)

Paul Hughes disappeared according to Life, November 1960 article, on bombing mission to Cuba from Florida. Antulio Ramirez Ortiz claims in "Castro's Red Hot Hell," part of the HSCA file, that Hughes was known to be imprisoned in Havana after the disappearance. Paul Hughes was allegedly executed for unknown reasons in Cuba.

HUGHES, ROBERT BENJAMIN, JR.

Sources: CD 7, pp. 580-582

Mary's

Comments: White male. DOB: 11/28/36. POB: Tulsa, Okla. Parking lot attendant All-right Parking Lot, 300-block of North Austin, Dallas. Unsuccessful candidate for State Legislature. Mother: Monetta Hughes.

HUGHES, ROBERT J. E.

Sources: WC Vol 25, p. 873; CE 2585, p. 3 (unnamed); CE 2591; CD 205, p. 158; CD 735, p. 6; Rush to Judgment, Lane, 346-348

Mary's

Comments: Witnessed assassination. Took 50' roll of 8mm Kodachrome movie film Main and Houston bearing exposures of the TSBD.

HUGHES, SARAH T. (JUDGE)

Sources: Warren Report, 22, 72; CD 7, pp. 771-772; Forgive My Grief I, Jones, 150

Mary's

Comments: U.S. District Judge. Administered oath of office to Lyndon B. Johnson. Received letter re "architect on the assassination" 11/25/63.

HUGHES, THOMAS LOWE (DR.)

Sources: SSCIA 157-10002-10081 (MMF 1793-1796)

Mary's

Comments: DOB: Dec 11, 1925. In Sept 6, 1963, memo from Gordon Chase to Bundy, Hughes is mentioned as one of those in INR (Research) who presumably had knowledge of exile raids and Operation MONGOOSE.

namebase.org

HUGHES JOHN (LAS VEGAS)

* Reid,E. Demaris,O. The Green Felt Jungle. 1964 (227, 230)

he was a shareholder [288 shares] in the Sahara Hotel and the Mint Casino [45 shares] address 709 Rancho Circle, Las Vegas

http://www.findagrav...=&df=all&GSob=n

First Name: Carol

Middle Name: L

Last Name: Hughes

Name Suffix:

Birth Date: 25 February 1936

Social Security Number: 316-32-0550

Place of Issuance: Indiana

Last Residence: Jefferson, Indiana

Zip Code of Last Residence: 47250

Death Date: 26 November 1999

Estimated Age at Death: 63

end

First Name: Carol

Middle Name: L

Last Name: Hughes

Name Suffix:

Birth Date: 8 September 1934

Social Security Number: 513-28-6884

Place of Issuance: Kansas

Last Residence: Burrton, Harvey, Kansas

Zip Code of Last Residence: 67020

Death Date: 25 February 2003

Estimated Age at Death: 69

end

First Name: Carol

Middle Name: L

Last Name: Hughes

Name Suffix:

Birth Date: 11 May 1934

Social Security Number: 549-44-2891

Place of Issuance: California

Last Residence:

Zip Code of Last Residence:

Death Date: 30 December 1991

Estimated Age at Death: 57

end

pardon the repeat obits, but they contain different hopefully pertinent factoids

Hartford Courant, The (CT) - November 19, 2000

Deceased Name: HUGHES , JOHN L. ``JACK''

HUGHES, John L. ``Jack''

John L. ``Jack'' Hughes, 85, of West Hartford, beloved father, grandfather, brother and uncle, died Saturday, (November 18, 2000) at Hartford Hospital. Born in Bridgeport on July 8, 1915, Jack graduated from Central High School in 1932, and Stetson University in 1936. He served for five years in the Army, including Europe, during World War II. Jack worked for the Engineering Department of Aetna Life & Casualty for many years, retiring in 1980. Dad, Gramp, U.J., could fix anything we broke, and grew a wonderful garden, sharing the abundance. He is survived by three daughters, JoAnn Royce and her husband, Barry, Judi Hughes Holland, and Joy Rinaldi and her husband, Tony; six beloved grandchildren, Kevin, Brian, Michael and Amy Royce, Terri Giglietti and Lisa Rinaldi; and four great granddaughters; a sister, Grace Hughes of Bridgeport; and many nieces and nephews. Jack was predeceased by a sister, Dorothy St. Onge. Funeral Procession will be held Tuesday, 9:15 a.m., from the Taylor & Modeen Funeral Home, 136 South Main St., West Hartford, followed by a Mass of Christian Burial, 10 a.m., to be celebrated at the Church of St. Helena, West Hartford. Burial will follow at St. Michael's Cemetery, Stratford. Calling hours will be held on Monday, 5-8 p.m., at the funeral home.

doesent mention his wife seems noticeably odd....

end

I think I am getting somewhere...look

San Diego Union, The (CA) - January 3, 1987

Deceased Name: Attorney John E. Hughes , 92; helped found American Legion

John Edward Hughes, a noted federal tax law attorney who after World War I helped found the American Legion, died Dec. 30 in Scripps Memorial Hospital. He was 92.

Mr. Hughes, a resident of La Jolla since 1960, was a senior partner in the Hughes and Hughes law firm in Chicago until his death. He had argued several precedent-setting cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and appeared often in other federal courts.

He wrote an early, definitive book on federal tax law, as well as many articles on tax law in professional publications.

Mr. Hughes was born in 1894 in Norwich, Conn. He took his law degree from Valparaiso University in Indiana and later became professor of contract law at the school.

He left the university to join his father in the Hughes law firm in Chicago.

During World War I, Mr. Hughes was a flying cadet and was commissioned an officer in the Air Service of the U.S. Army. At the end of World War I, he became one of the founders of the American Legion.

In 1960, he moved from Lake Forest in the Chicago area to La Jolla. Mr. Hughes was a world traveler and, early in the century, was a big-game hunter in Africa.

He also was known in racing circles throughout the country. He had breeding farms on both the East Coast and West Coast and owned race horses at the time of his death. His horses had raced at the major tracks in the country under the Hughes racing colors of purple and yellow.

Mr. Hughes is survived by his wife, Beatrice, of La Jolla; two sons, John of Chicago and Mansfield of Dallas; six grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

There will be no public services.

Chicago Sun-Times (IL) - January 1, 1987

Deceased Name: John E. Hughes , author, ex-Loop lawyer

John E. Hughes, 92, an author and former Loop attorney, died Tuesday in La Jolla, Calif., his home since 1962.

Mr. Hughes was born in Connecticut, served as a pilot in the Army Air Corps in World War I, went to Valparaiso University and became a lawyer in 1919.

His specialty was corporate income tax law. He also argued a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and was author of Federal Death Tax and a second book on Social Security.

Mr. Hughes, a former Lake Forest resident, was a founding member of the American Legion and Commonwealth Club, a world traveler, big-game hunter and thoroughbred racehorse owner and breeder.

According to his son, John W., Mr. Hughes' horses ran several times in the Preakness and one, Silent Shot, was scratched from the 1933 Kentucky Derby because "he was a mudder and it didn't rain."

Survivors include his wife, the former Countess Beatrice Marie-Louise Rex. Her grandfather, Count Karl Rex, was Saxon minister to Austria-Hungary from 1898 to 1910. She reliquished her title on marrying Mr. Hughes.

Also surviving is another son, H. Mansfield.

Services and interment will be private.

end

Chicago Sun-Times (IL) - January 1, 1987

Deceased Name: John E. Hughes , author, ex-Loop lawyer

John E. Hughes, 92, an author and former Loop attorney, died Tuesday in La Jolla, Calif., his home since 1962.

Mr. Hughes was born in Connecticut, served as a pilot in the Army Air Corps in World War I, went to Valparaiso University and became a lawyer in 1919.

His specialty was corporate income tax law. He also argued a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and was author of Federal Death Tax and a second book on Social Security.

Mr. Hughes, a former Lake Forest resident, was a founding member of the American Legion and Commonwealth Club, a world traveler, big-game hunter and thoroughbred racehorse owner and breeder.

According to his son, John W., Mr. Hughes' horses ran several times in the Preakness and one, Silent Shot, was scratched from the 1933 Kentucky Derby because "he was a mudder and it didn't rain."

Survivors include his wife, the former Countess Beatrice Marie-Louise Rex. Her grandfather, Count Karl Rex, was Saxon minister to Austria-Hungary from 1898 to 1910. She reliquished her title on marrying Mr. Hughes.

Also surviving is another son, H. Mansfield.

Services and interment will be private.

Chicago Sun-Times (IL) - January 1, 1987

John E. Hughes , author, ex-Loop lawyer

John E. Hughes, 92, an author and former Loop attorney, died Tuesday in La Jolla, Calif., his home since 1962.

Mr. Hughes was born in Connecticut, served as a pilot in the Army Air Corps in World War I, went to Valparaiso University and became a lawyer in 1919.

His specialty was corporate income tax law. He also argued a number of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and was author of Federal Death Tax and a second book on Social Security.

Mr. Hughes, a former Lake Forest resident, was a founding member of the American Legion and Commonwealth Club, a world traveler, big-game hunter and thoroughbred racehorse owner and breeder.

According to his son, John W., Mr. Hughes' horses ran several times in the Preakness and one, Silent Shot, was scratched from the 1933 Kentucky Derby because "he was a mudder and it didn't rain."

Survivors include his wife, the former Countess Beatrice Marie-Louise Rex. Her grandfather, Count Karl Rex, was Saxon minister to Austria-Hungary from 1898 to 1910. She reliquished her title on marrying Mr. Hughes.

Also surviving is another son, H. Mansfield.

Services and interment will be private.

end

Chicago Tribune (IL) - February 28, 1969

U.S. GENERAL DIES IN ITALY PLANE CRASH

Deceased Name: Maj. Gen. John S. Hughes

MILAN, Italy, Feb. 27 -- Maj. Gen. John S. Hughes, commander of all United States army troops in north Italy, was killed tonight when a small military plane crashed on takeoff from Milan airport.

Hughes, 52, of Fort Worth, Tex., had assumed command last May of the United States southern Europe task force [sETAF]. Also killed in the Crash was Maj. Edward Haislop, 32, of Parkersburg, W. Va., who was piloting the craft on a flight to Pisa.

2 Are Injured

Two other American service men were injured. Authorities identified them as the co-pilot, Maj. Gordon Cooper, 34, also of Parkersburg, and Sp. 5/c Wallace Runyan, 21, originally of Fairbury, Ill., but now a resident of Milan.

Cooper and Runyan were listed in critical condition in a Milan clinic, with fractures and burns.

Engines Lose Power

Officials said the plane's engines apparently lost power. The craft, a U-8D, crashed into a huge advertising sign along a street just 300 yards from the airport. It caught fire.

An investigation was begun by SETAF authorities to determine the cause of the crash.

end

Edited by Robert Howard
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  • 5 months later...
Guest Tom Scully

Question and Answers for Tom Scully......

Tom, I believe you know me well enough that you realize that I believe this thread contains a lot of facts that are much more

than "interesting."

On that note, and with a specific area in mind.....you do know about Mrs John L. (Carol) Hughes right?

Diagram of Second Floor of TSBD

also Carol Hughes (Not on Westphal memo)

Warren Commission 6:339; 22:654

http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=486040

excerpts of Warren Commission testimony of Geneva L. Hine

Mr. Ball.

On the 22nd of November 1963, did you know that there was to be a motorcade or parade come by your building?

Miss HINE. Oh, yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

How did 'you find that out?

Miss HINE. Sir, I don't remember. I probably heard over the news but I cannot remember.

Mr. Ball.

You were just aware of the fact?

Miss HINE. Yes; I knew it and the girls were discussing it in the office that morning. Many of them, probably six, had not seen the President close. You see, I had seen him on two different occasions and I had been very close to him and so they were lamenting that they couldn't go out so I spoke up and said "I will be glad to answer the telephone so you girls may go out and see the motorcade" and I bad previously answered the telephone when we were in the other building before we moved in this building, so they were delighted and I thought nothing about it.

Mr. Ball.

Did they all go out?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; everyone went out.

Mr. BALL. Was there anyone left in the office part of the building on that second floor office?

Miss HINE. Only Mr. [Otis] Williams and myself and he stayed with me because he was working on his desk until he thought that the motorcade was about there.

Mr. Ball.

How many [shots] did you hear?

Miss HINE. Three.

Mr. Ball.

Could you tell where the shots were coming from?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; they came from inside the building.

Mr. Ball.

How do you know that?

Miss HINE. Because the building vibrated from the result of the explosion coming in.

Mr. Ball.

It appeared to you that the shots came from the building?

Mr. Ball.

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

Did you know they were shots at the time?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; they sounded almost like cannon shots they were so terrific.

Mr. Ball.

That is when you were at the window, is that right?

Miss HINE Yes, sir; that is when I was at the window, because the next car, you see, was coming up and turning and I looked. Of course I looked when I heard the shots. I just stood there and saw people running to the east up Elm Street. I saw people running; I saw people falling down, you know,

lying down on the sidewalk.

Mr. Ball.

That was on Houston Street?

Miss HINE. No, sir; Elm.

Mr. Ball.

You could see could you see any part of Elm?

Miss HINE. East, yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

You could see east on Elm?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; I could see east on Elm. I saw them run across east on Elm away from where his car had gone and my first thought was if I could only see what happened, so I went out our front door into the foyer.

Mr. Ball.

You mean the front door to the office?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

That opens on---

Miss HINE. The foyer, little hall, and---

Mr. Ball.

Steps lead down?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir; but there is a door before the steps and the elevator is to my left and I went past the hall that goes to my right and I knocked on the door of Lyons and Carnahan; that's a publishing company.

Mr. Ball.

What did you do then?

Miss HINE. I tried the door, sir, and it was locked and I couldn't get in and I called, "Me, please let me in," because she's the girl that had that office, Mrs. Lee Watley, and she didn't answer. I don't know if she was there or not, then I left her door. I retraced my steps back to where the hall turns to my left and went down it to Southwestern Publishing Co.'s door and I tried their door and the reason for this was because those windows face out.

Mr. Ball.

On to Elm?

Miss HINE. Yes; and on to the triple underpass.

Mr. Ball.

I See.

Miss HINE. And there was a girl in there talking on the telephone and I could hear her but she didn't answer the door.

Mr. Ball.

Was the door locked?

Miss HINE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ball.

That was which company?

Miss HINE. Southwestern Publishing Co.

Mr. Ball.

Did you call to her?

Miss HINE. I called and called and shook the door and she didn't answer me because she was talking on the telephone; I could hear her. They have a little curtain up and I could see her form through the curtains. I could see her talking and I knew that's what she was doing and then I turned and went through the back hall and came through the back door.

Mr. Ball.

Of your office, the second floor office?

Miss HINE. Yes; and I went straight up to the desk because the telephones were beginning to wink; outside calls were beginning to come in.

Mr. Ball.

Did they come in rapidly?

Miss HINE They did come in rapidly.

Mr. Ball.

When you came back in did you see Mrs. Reid?

Miss HINE. No, sir; I don't believe there was a soul in the office when I came back in right then.

END

Room 203 is listed in a JFK Document as, apparently shared between

Gloria Calvery

Karan Hicks...related to DPD J.B. Hicks, 4318 Matilda who worked under Lt. Day, or Jim Hicks who testified at the Shaw trial

and wound up incarcerated at a mental hospital?

Carol Hughes

Carol Reed

Karen Westbrook...related to DPD Captain W.R. Westbrook?

see

http://www.maryferre...bsPageId=993276

only WC/FBI contact with Mrs. John L. "Carol" Hughes

I, Mrs. John L. [Carol] Hughes make the following voluntary statement to Alfred D. Neely who has identified himself as a Special Agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. I am of the Caucasian race, 27 years of age and reside at 510 Glenfield Street, Garland, Texas. I am employed by the South-Western Publishing Co., Room 203 Texas School Book Depository, 411 Elm Street, Dallas, Texas. On November 22, 1963, I went to south window near my desk to watch the Presidential Motorcade passing along at Houston and Elm Streets. I was standing looking out this window when President John F. Kennedy was shot. I was alone in the office as all the other people had gone to the street to watch the Motorcade pass. I did not see Lee Harvey Oswald at that time. I do not know Oswald but I had seen him in the building several times prior to this day. I do not recall seeing any strangers in the building on November 22, 1963. I remained in my office until about 1:30 P.M. when I left for the day and went home.

END

Not surprisingly, Carol Hughes' appearances in Warren Commission documents and interviews

is not exactly "all over the place;" why would that be?

In all fairness, non-coincidence theorists might say "the trauma of literally having watched

President Kennedy's assassination has different effects on different people, it's not

out of the realm of possibility she got on the phone to insulate herself from the trauma

of what she had just witnessed." But personally, I find the lack of investigation into this area

of what took place in the Depository on November 22, 1963 to be very suspicious and

disturbing, and am willing to risk some degree of ridicule in saying so.

I did some digging and discovered what strongly appears to be a discrepancy in the Warren Commission documents, unless Mr and Mrs John L. Hughes decided to move four houses down from where they lived sometime in 1963......

FYI: Garland is a suburb in the same manner that Irving or Arlington are

1964 Dallas Residential White Pages Listings

page 24 Garland suburban section at back

John L Hughes 502 Glenfield Dr BR8-0789

John L Hughes Jr., 502 Glenfield Dr BR8-9744

I also have an obituary collection that has over eighty or so names, I have been unable to find anything

about Mr and Mrs. John and Carol Hughes......of course, I also do not have a subscription

to newspaperarchive.com

Have you ever seen a Carol Hughes referenced in relation to Maury Hughes, Howard Hughes or anyone else?

Stabs in the dark.....

.....

Robert, I've spent much time on this. I go back to it every now and then, once the frustration over the last fruitless effort, ebbs.

I am pleased to finally say with cautious confidence that I have cracked this puzzle. These are the same record, one confirms the other.:

SortedByName.com

sortedbyname.com/pages/l100363.html

LANNOM, ANN C who was 45 (born ABT 1937) married 17 JUN 1982 in DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS, U.S.A. a groom named NORMAN D PATTERSON who was

Texas Marriages 1982 page 137

http://marriagesintexas.com/index_pages/1982-137.html

096411, PATTERSON NORMAN D, 42, LANNOM ANN C, 45, 6/17/1982, 57, DALLAS.

Confirmation; same 1982 groom, but bride is described as "Hughes, Ann C." :

http://roamdallaspropertyrecords.com/ailis/search.do?indexName=dallasdetails&templateName=mldetails_SN&lq=Instrument%3A%22198250113818%22

To top it off, they did it again, in 1996.:

SortedByName.com

http://sortedbyname.com/pages/p100530.html

PATTERSON, NORMAN D who was 42 (born ABT 1940) married 17 JUN 1982 in DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS, U.S.A. a bride named ANN C LANNOM who was 45 (born ABT 1937). 461,214

Here’s why you should check the source file (free), then search Archives and PeopleSmart for NORMAN D PATTERSON.

(Norman divorced this one after less than one year of marriage):

PATTERSON, NORMAN D who was 54 (born ABT 1939) married 4 JUL 1993 in TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS, U.S.A. a bride named MARY A MARTIN who was 53 (born ABT 1940). 461,215

Here’s why you should check the source file (free), then search Archives and PeopleSmart for NORMAN D PATTERSON.

PATTERSON, NORMAN D who was 56 (born ABT 1940) married 15 JUN 1996 in TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS, U.S.A. a bride named CAROL H LANNOM who was 59 (born ABT 1937).

At this link, you can view a .pdf of the actual two page image of the instrument recording conveyance in 1982, of John L. Hughes's interest in their Garland, TX residence to Carol Hughes, presumably as per their divorce agreement.:

http://roamdallaspropertyrecords.com/ailis/search.do?indexName=dallasimages&lq=Instrument%3A198200931731

The house conveyed from John to Carol in Feb., 1982 was built in 1963.:

http://dfw.blockshopper.com/property/26501500030130000/906_peace_rose_avenue

John and Carol had two sons, the first was born less than a year before the assassination. Both birth records describe mother as Ann Carol Lannom and father as John Leroy Hughes, Jr.

I've found recent contact info of both sons, and I thought I had a reliable source of Carol's contact info, but she was aupposedly living with this guy, probably a relation of her deceased husband, Norman, but her housemate, Richard A. Patterson, too, is now gone.:

http://www.tributes.com/show/Richard-Patterson-91070921

I found something linking Carol's older son to Richard A. Patterson. I think there is a decent chance Carol is living, and that at least one of her sons can be easily contacted.

I haven't found anything on the family of Ann Carol Lannom Hughes Patterson's first husband, John L. Hughes, Jr.

Edited by Tom Scully
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