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Guest John Gillespie
Orson Welles explains .....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKIDduxrIFg

THANKS TO,,,,,,Peter Fokes,

Toronto

b

___________________________________________________________

Bernice,

That's wonderful stuff. I attended leland Powers School of Radio, TV & Theater in Boston many years ago and we would put on the occasional radio play. Ah, the use of boom mics, sound effects, etc. There is an unforgettable made for TV movie about that 1938 Halloween night when The Mercury Theater broadcast "The War of The Worlds". The movie is called "The Night That Panicked America" and was on sometime in the Seventies. In fact, one of the networks here in the U.S. played it every Halloween for a number of years. It is not available for purchase anywhere and it has been many years since it was last shown on TV, but you can view it on youtube in multiple parts, of course. The video is poor, but watch it anyway.

Paul Shenar ('Sosa', the drug kingpin from South America in "Scarface") is brilliant as Welles. It also stars Tom Bosley, John Ritter and Vic Morrow. The film depicts several fictitious vignettes of the reactions by different families and groups to the broadcast; also, the broadcast production was recreated and the part that endeared me was the preparation and use of the sound effects as well as the studio scenes with the various actors/announcers playing cards, smoking and watching the clock and their scripts for cues. One scene showed Bosley and a female production worker slowly opening a large empty jar while holding it just inside a toilet, in order to affect the sound of a martian spaceship lid opening, as described of course by the, ahem, on-the-spot 'reporter' in Grovers Mill, a real New Jersey Town. Fantastic!

Regards,

JG

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Orson Welles explains .....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKIDduxrIFg

THANKS TO,,,,,,Peter Fokes,

Toronto

b

___________________________________________________________

Bernice,

That's wonderful stuff. I attended leland Powers School of Radio, TV & Theater in Boston many years ago and we would put on the occasional radio play. Ah, the use of boom mics, sound effects, etc. There is an unforgettable made for TV movie about that 1938 Halloween night when The Mercury Theater broadcast "The War of The Worlds". The movie is called "The Night That Panicked America" and was on sometime in the Seventies. In fact, one of the networks here in the U.S. played it every Halloween for a number of years. It is not available for purchase anywhere and it has been many years since it was last shown on TV, but you can view it on youtube in multiple parts, of course. The video is poor, but watch it anyway.

Paul Shenar ('Sosa', the drug kingpin from South America in "Scarface") is brilliant as Welles. It also stars Tom Bosley, John Ritter and Vic Morrow. The film depicts several fictitious vignettes of the reactions by different families and groups to the broadcast; also, the broadcast production was recreated and the part that endeared me was the preparation and use of the sound effects as well as the studio scenes with the various actors/announcers playing cards, smoking and watching the clock and their scripts for cues. One scene showed Bosley and a female production worker slowly opening a large empty jar while holding it just inside a toilet, in order to affect the sound of a martian spaceship lid opening, as described of course by the, ahem, on-the-spot 'reporter' in Grovers Mill, a real New Jersey Town. Fantastic!

Regards,

JG

Hey JG,

Wells never lived up to his genius potential in Hollywood.

I wonder if the potential of a martian attack wasn't behind some of the UFO psych warfare games the military played in the 50s and 60s to hide the U2 and other special ops craft?

Also, JG, did you ever order Craig Robert's book "Dead Witnesses"?

And btw, I'm living in Browns Mills, New Jersey, in the heart of the Pine Barrens in Central Jersey.

Grovers Mill, I believe, is further north.

BK

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thanks john for stirring the memories, when my boys were growing up, the war of the wrlds was their favourite, and the youngest yes even to theoint of taking a very large empty piclle jar restaurant size, into the washroom, and conducting their own experiment . it worked then of course it was repeated for the neighbourhood fellas, he now has both movies, and still gets into them some things never change, and his son is now the new expert...thanks again..ps i believe he taped his copy of'' the night that paniced america'' from the telly, it is still shown here at times, funny thing is when i was growing up my mother used to tell us all about the radio broadcast apparently they had listened to it that evening...so it was passed along....and Bill do not move any closer to Grovers Mills, they just may pick that spot in the future seeing it has been laid out for them already.. :lol: .thanks fellas stay well..best b.. :ice

http://www.war-of-the-worlds.org/Radio/

http://www.davidicke.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1078987

http://thedenofmystery.blogspot.com/2008/1...-of-worlds.html

download or listen to program..below

http://xviperhour.org/waroftheworlds.aspx

Edited by Bernice Moore
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The War of the Worlds

by H. G. Wells (1898)

Book One

The Coming of the Martians

Chapter One

The Eve of the War

But who shall dwell in these worlds if they be inhabited? . . .

Are we or they Lords of the World? . . .

And how are all things made for man?--

Kepler (quoted in The Anatomy of Melancholy)

No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

Edited by John Dolva
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