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Texas Tower Killer Grand Jury -

Houston McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury on August 5, 1966 and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman. McCoy received the Austin Police Medal of Vlor in 1967 for his part in subduing sniper Charles Whitman….

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young.

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young…..

Huston Roy McCoy

Houston Roy McCoy is an Austin, Texas police officer who killed sniper Charles Whitman at the University of Texas at Austin on August 1, 1966.

A native of Menard, Texas, he attended Menard High School where he was active in sports and named "Class Favorite" and "Best All Around Boy".

He graduated in 1958 and joined the Austin Police Department in May 1963. While on the force, he obtained his commercial flight instructor license and volunteered his time to the Boy Scouts of America.

After the event

On August 5, 1966, McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman.

Two years after the event, McCoy left the police force and was employed as a civilian flight instructor under the T-41 program with the United States Air Force in Del Rio, Texas. In January 1975, he became the Camp Ranger for the Boy Scouts at Camp Sol Mayer near Fort McKavett State Historic Site, serving as Camp Ranger until 1987. In April 2000, the State of Texas granted a Worker's Compensation Award and in May 2000 the City of Austin sued McCoy to deny the award.

Awards

*On August 9, 2007 Houston McCoy, along with 13 other recipients, received the Distinguished Service Award from the City of Austin for their role in the tragedy of August 1, 1966.

*On May 7, 2009, Houston McCoy and other first responders involved in the UT Tower incident were awarded Honorary Membership of the Austin Police Association.

Report of the Travis County Grand Jury

http://alt.cimedia.c...itman/grand.pdf

Why wasn't there a similar Grand Jury investigation and report on the murder of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit?

BK

Texas Justice worked in the aftermath of the Texas Tower killings, in which a real deranged Lone Nut and former military man shot randomly at people and killed many until two policeman mananged to climb the tower and kill him.

It later turned out that Charles Whitman had told the univeristy psychiatrist the week before that he had an urge to shoot people from the tower.

I presume, though a Texas lawyer who knows more about this incident can set me straight, but I presume that the county grand jury was convened to officially exonerate the two policemen and the doctor, but it could have been for another reason that I am not aware of.

This brings up the on topic question of why, if the Constitutional processes were known to the legal eagles of Texas, and properly applied after the Texas Tower killings, why they were not applied in the aftermath of the murders of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit and suspect in that murder, Lee Harvey Oswald, while in custody of the Dallas police?

Would not the grand jury system properly determine if Oswald did indeed murder Tippit, and whether any Dallas policemen should have been indicted for any crimes related to the murder of Oswald?

Why wasn't the Constitution followed by the local Texas judicial system and since there is no statute of limitations on murder, can they still be applied today?

BK

Edited by William Kelly
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Texas Tower Killer Grand Jury -

Houston McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury on August 5, 1966 and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman. McCoy received the Austin Police Medal of Vlor in 1967 for his part in subduing sniper Charles Whitman….

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young.

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young…..

Huston Roy McCoy

Houston Roy McCoy is an Austin, Texas police officer who killed sniper Charles Whitman at the University of Texas at Austin on August 1, 1966.

A native of Menard, Texas, he attended Menard High School where he was active in sports and named "Class Favorite" and "Best All Around Boy".

He graduated in 1958 and joined the Austin Police Department in May 1963. While on the force, he obtained his commercial flight instructor license and volunteered his time to the Boy Scouts of America.

After the event

On August 5, 1966, McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman.

Two years after the event, McCoy left the police force and was employed as a civilian flight instructor under the T-41 program with the United States Air Force in Del Rio, Texas. In January 1975, he became the Camp Ranger for the Boy Scouts at Camp Sol Mayer near Fort McKavett State Historic Site, serving as Camp Ranger until 1987. In April 2000, the State of Texas granted a Worker's Compensation Award and in May 2000 the City of Austin sued McCoy to deny the award.

Awards

*On August 9, 2007 Houston McCoy, along with 13 other recipients, received the Distinguished Service Award from the City of Austin for their role in the tragedy of August 1, 1966.

*On May 7, 2009, Houston McCoy and other first responders involved in the UT Tower incident were awarded Honorary Membership of the Austin Police Association.

Report of the Travis County Grand Jury

http://alt.cimedia.c...itman/grand.pdf

Why wasn't there a similar Grand Jury investigation and report on the murder of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit?

BK

Texas Justice worked in the aftermath of the Texas Tower killings, in which a real deranged Lone Nut and former military man shot randomly at people and killed many until two policeman mananged to climb the tower and kill him.

It later turned out that Charles Whitman had told the univeristy psychiatrist the week before that he had an urge to shoot people from the tower.

I presume, though a Texas lawyer who knows more about this incident can set me straight, but I presume that the county grand jury was convened to officially exonerate the two policemen and the doctor, but it could have been for another reason that I am not aware of.

This brings up the on topic question of why, if the Constitutional processes were known to the legal eagles of Texas, and properly applied after the Texas Tower killings, why they were not applied in the aftermath of the murders of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit and suspect in that murder, Lee Harvey Oswald, while in custody of the Dallas police?

Would not the grand jury system properly determine if Oswald did indeed murder Tippit, and whether any Dallas policemen should have been indicted for any crimes related to the murder of Oswald?

Why wasn't the Constitution followed by the local Texas judicial system and since there is no statute of limitations on murder, can they still be applied today?

BK

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Texas Tower Killer Grand Jury -

Houston McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury on August 5, 1966 and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman. McCoy received the Austin Police Medal of Vlor in 1967 for his part in subduing sniper Charles Whitman….

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young.

On pages 243 and 244 of A Sniper in the Tower, Lavergne states "[The period after the shootings] was a period of kindness. The police and even the Travis County Grand Jury sought to protect C.A. Whitman from his son's vitriolic notes." Charlie apparently wrote lots of notes, including one asking "After my death I wish that an autopsy be performed on me to see if there is any visible physical disorder." Just how many of these notes the actual public at large has been privy to is anybody's guess. I'd venture there's stuff we've never even seen. Evidence for my assumption: The Austin Police Department and Chief Bob Miles scrambling to cover their butts in the wake of the disaster, spin-controlling the whole mess from an Anglo xxxx-up to a Hispanic triumph ala the patrolman who actually killed Whitman.

The medical community ran scared as well: UT's, due to unwariness (On March 29, 1966, Whitman had spent an hour with psychiatrist Dr. Maurice Dean Heatley at the University Health Center. During this meeting Dr. Heatley noted Charles "oozing hostility," and recalled Whitman's reference to "thinking about going up on the tower with a deer rifle and start shooting people." Charles was told to "make an appointment for the same day next week." He never did.), the community at large, Dr. Coleman de Chenar, presiding, declaring the 2x1.5x1 cm. tumor found in Whitman's brain not to have "had any correlation to psychosis...," an autopsy performed, according to Lavergne, "after Whitman had been embalmed."

In fact, it would seem the powers-that-were were mostly interested in covering asses, both C.A. Whitman's, and their own while waiting for the whole thing to dissipate sans explanation, like the Tomcat Society trying to obscure the fact they often dine on their young…..

Huston Roy McCoy

Houston Roy McCoy is an Austin, Texas police officer who killed sniper Charles Whitman at the University of Texas at Austin on August 1, 1966.

A native of Menard, Texas, he attended Menard High School where he was active in sports and named "Class Favorite" and "Best All Around Boy".

He graduated in 1958 and joined the Austin Police Department in May 1963. While on the force, he obtained his commercial flight instructor license and volunteered his time to the Boy Scouts of America.

After the event

On August 5, 1966, McCoy appeared before the Travis County Grand Jury and received a justifiable homicide verdict for the death of Whitman.

Two years after the event, McCoy left the police force and was employed as a civilian flight instructor under the T-41 program with the United States Air Force in Del Rio, Texas. In January 1975, he became the Camp Ranger for the Boy Scouts at Camp Sol Mayer near Fort McKavett State Historic Site, serving as Camp Ranger until 1987. In April 2000, the State of Texas granted a Worker's Compensation Award and in May 2000 the City of Austin sued McCoy to deny the award.

Awards

*On August 9, 2007 Houston McCoy, along with 13 other recipients, received the Distinguished Service Award from the City of Austin for their role in the tragedy of August 1, 1966.

*On May 7, 2009, Houston McCoy and other first responders involved in the UT Tower incident were awarded Honorary Membership of the Austin Police Association.

Report of the Travis County Grand Jury

http://alt.cimedia.c...itman/grand.pdf

Why wasn't there a similar Grand Jury investigation and report on the murder of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit?

BK

Texas Justice worked in the aftermath of the Texas Tower killings, in which a real deranged Lone Nut and former military man shot randomly at people and killed many until two policeman mananged to climb the tower and kill him.

It later turned out that Charles Whitman had told the univeristy psychiatrist the week before that he had an urge to shoot people from the tower.

I presume, though a Texas lawyer who knows more about this incident can set me straight, but I presume that the county grand jury was convened to officially exonerate the two policemen and the doctor, but it could have been for another reason that I am not aware of.

This brings up the on topic question of why, if the Constitutional processes were known to the legal eagles of Texas, and properly applied after the Texas Tower killings, why they were not applied in the aftermath of the murders of Dallas policeman J.D. Tippit and suspect in that murder, Lee Harvey Oswald, while in custody of the Dallas police?

Would not the grand jury system properly determine if Oswald did indeed murder Tippit, and whether any Dallas policemen should have been indicted for any crimes related to the murder of Oswald?

Why wasn't the Constitution followed by the local Texas judicial system and since there is no statute of limitations on murder, can they still be applied today?

BK

Bill, if, in pursuing this matter, you get access to the autopsy protocols to Whitman and his victims, I'd appreciate your sending them my way. I believe they would show just how irregular were Kennedy's wounds, and help discredit the single-bullet theory, among other things.

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