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Grand jury indicts Cuban exile militant Luis Posada Carriles and two associatesBY ALFONSO CHARDY AND JAY WEAVER

achardy@MiamiHerald.com

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Luis Posada Carriles

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Santiago Alvarez

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Osvaldo Mitat

A federal grand jury in El Paso, Texas handed down a seven-count indictment today against Cuban exile militant Luis Posada Carriles, charging him with lying about how he sneaked into the United States in March 2005. It is the first time the CIA-trained Posada has been charged with a crime in the United States.

His chief benefactor, Santiago Alvarez, and another supporter -- Osvaldo Mitat -- were also indicted after they refused to testify before the same grand jury today. They were charged with contempt of court when they invoked their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

The indictment accused Posada, 78, of making false statements to immigration officials about how he arrived in the United States. Posada has insisted he came through the Mexican border, but the indictment asserted Posada entered the United States by sea aboard the shrimping vessel Santrina crewed by Alvarez, Mitat and others.

This is the first time Posada has been criminally charged in the United States, the country he viewed as an ally and safe haven because of his past connections to the CIA and the U.S. military. By indicting Posada, the federal government ensures his continued detention.

The possibility of Posada's release loomed closer after a federal judge in El Paso, in a separate case, set a Feb. 1 deadline for the U.S. government to justify the militant's continued detention. The judge's action came after a federal magistrate recommended that Posada be released. The U.S. government objected on the ground that releasing Posada -- who Cuba and Venezuela consider a ''terrorist'' -- could pose adverse foreign policy consequences.

Posada has been in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement since he was detained in Miami-Dade County on May 17, 2005. He was then flown to El Paso where he has been held at an immigration facility.

Posada is wanted in Venezuela for his alleged role in the bombing of a Cuban airliner in 1976 that killed 73 people and in Cuba for his alleged role in the bombing of several tourist sites in 1997 that killed one Italian tourist.

The indictment alleged Posada made the false statements on his application for naturalization ''on or about Sept. 10, 2005,'' the Justice Department said.

The indictment also alleges that he knowingly made false statements under oath during his naturalization interview with Department of Homeland Security officials on April 25 and 26, 2006.

In his naturalization interview, the Justice Department said, Posada allegedly made several false statements regarding his March 2005 entry into the United States, ``including statements about the transportation routes and methods used, as well as individuals who accompanied him.''

For example, the indictment charges that Posada said he ''traveled from Honduras through Belize and entered the United States over land near Matamoros, Mexico, and Brownsville, Texas,'' with the assistance of an unidentified alien smuggler.

In fact, the indictment said, Posada entered the United States aboard the Santrina accompanied by Alvarez and Mitat among others.

M O R E N E W S F R O M

• Brownsville, TX

• Matamoros, Mexico

• Miami Dade County, FL

• El Paso Metro

• World News

• Mexico

• El Paso, TX

• Tamaulipas, Mexico

• Discuss Tamaulipas, Mexico

Edited by John Geraghty
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Grand jury indicts Cuban exile militant Luis Posada Carriles and two associatesBY ALFONSO CHARDY AND JAY WEAVER

achardy@MiamiHerald.com

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Luis Posada Carriles

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Santiago Alvarez

Document | Indictment in U.S. v. Osvaldo Mitat

A federal grand jury in El Paso, Texas handed down a seven-count indictment today against Cuban exile militant Luis Posada Carriles, charging him with lying about how he sneaked into the United States in March 2005. It is the first time the CIA-trained Posada has been charged with a crime in the United States.

His chief benefactor, Santiago Alvarez, and another supporter -- Osvaldo Mitat -- were also indicted after they refused to testify before the same grand jury today. They were charged with contempt of court when they invoked their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.

The indictment accused Posada, 78, of making false statements to immigration officials about how he arrived in the United States. Posada has insisted he came through the Mexican border, but the indictment asserted Posada entered the United States by sea aboard the shrimping vessel Santrina crewed by Alvarez, Mitat and others.

This is the first time Posada has been criminally charged in the United States, the country he viewed as an ally and safe haven because of his past connections to the CIA and the U.S. military. By indicting Posada, the federal government ensures his continued detention.

The possibility of Posada's release loomed closer after a federal judge in El Paso, in a separate case, set a Feb. 1 deadline for the U.S. government to justify the militant's continued detention. The judge's action came after a federal magistrate recommended that Posada be released. The U.S. government objected on the ground that releasing Posada -- who Cuba and Venezuela consider a ''terrorist'' -- could pose adverse foreign policy consequences.

Posada has been in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement since he was detained in Miami-Dade County on May 17, 2005. He was then flown to El Paso where he has been held at an immigration facility.

Posada is wanted in Venezuela for his alleged role in the bombing of a Cuban airliner in 1976 that killed 73 people and in Cuba for his alleged role in the bombing of several tourist sites in 1997 that killed one Italian tourist.

The indictment alleged Posada made the false statements on his application for naturalization ''on or about Sept. 10, 2005,'' the Justice Department said.

The indictment also alleges that he knowingly made false statements under oath during his naturalization interview with Department of Homeland Security officials on April 25 and 26, 2006.

In his naturalization interview, the Justice Department said, Posada allegedly made several false statements regarding his March 2005 entry into the United States, ``including statements about the transportation routes and methods used, as well as individuals who accompanied him.''

For example, the indictment charges that Posada said he ''traveled from Honduras through Belize and entered the United States over land near Matamoros, Mexico, and Brownsville, Texas,'' with the assistance of an unidentified alien smuggler.

In fact, the indictment said, Posada entered the United States aboard the Santrina accompanied by Alvarez and Mitat among others.

M O R E N E W S F R O M

• Brownsville, TX

• Matamoros, Mexico

• Miami Dade County, FL

• El Paso Metro

• World News

• Mexico

• El Paso, TX

• Tamaulipas, Mexico

• Discuss Tamaulipas, Mexico

Opps, the title is supposed to say " Posada"; that's what I get for trying to post while on the phone. Tried to to fix , but apparently can only edit text but not topic titles...

Dawn

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  • 2 months later...

U.S. judge sets bail for anti-Castro Cuban exile

By Aracely Lazcano

EL PASO, Texas (Reuters)
- A United States judge said on Friday Cuban exile and former CIA operative Luis Posada Carriles should be freed on bail until his trial on immigration fraud charges, but he remained behind bars at the request of federal prosecutors.

Judge Kathleen Cardone said in a written order 79-year-old Posada Carriles, despite "a controversial past" as an opponent of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, was not a flight risk because he is "old, infirm and has strong ties to the community."

She set bail at a total of $350,000 and said Posada Carriles must wear an electronic monitoring device and live under house arrest with his wife in Miami.....

Full story:

http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idU...07?pageNumber=1

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How to shut people up, reward them, and encourage terrorism "a burlesque legal show"

"The indictment accused Posada, 78, of making false statements to immigration officials about how he arrived in the United States. Posada has insisted he came through the Mexican border, but the indictment asserted Posada entered the United States by sea aboard the shrimping vessel Santrina crewed by Alvarez, Mitat and others.

This is the first time Posada has been criminally charged in the United States, the country he viewed as an ally and safe haven because of his past connections to the CIA and the U.S. military. By indicting Posada, the federal government ensures his continued detention."

__________________________

"On April 17, 2005, warning that Posada Carriles could be "disappeared" in the United States, President Fidel Castro commented: "In order that they don’t kill him now, don’t poison him, don’t say that he died of a heart attack or a brain hemorrhage, we are prepared to send doctors to look after him, so that he tells what he knows and goes on trial." "

from Granma International English version:

http://www.granma.cu/ingles/2007/abril/mar3/14ache.html

and various linked articles

"Luis Posada Carriles was recruited as an agent for the CIA (U.S. Central Intelligence Agency) when the father of the current U.S. president was participating in the organization of the failed Bay of Pigs invasion. Over the next four decades, Posada worked for that organization as a torturer and assassin for the Venezuelan secret police, DISIP, under the name of Comisario Basilio, and as the right hand man of Félix "El Gato" Rodríguez Mendigutía, trafficking cocaine and weapons in El Salvador.

Posada Carriles, together with Orlando Bosch, ordered the 1976 mid-flight destruction of a Cubana Airlines passenger plane, killing 73 people."

"District Attorney Paul Ahern stated that there was no guarantee that Posada would remain under house arrest, given that he escaped from a Venezuelan jail in 1985 after being charged with the attack on the Cuban aircraft and traveled on false passports on a number of occasions. With surprising frankness, Hernández responded that those passports were facilitated by the U.S. government, which was aware of his existence at least when Posada Carriles was a CIA informer. Nobody denied that assertion. One of the terrorist’s lawyers, Matthew L. Archambeault, argued on another occasion that Posada "knows a lot" and that if he talked, it could be damaging to the FBI, the CIA and the government in general. Hernández’ reference seems to be a similar attempt to pressure the justice system.

The Bush family connection with anti-Cuban terrorism and Posada in particular dates back to the early 1960s and goes from Operation 40 in the context of the failed Bay of Pigs invasion to the presence of CIA agent Jorge Mas Canosa at the head of the Cuban-American National Foundation, which funded and directed acts of terrorism confessed to by Posada. Hernández offered bail in the form of a commercial property in Miami valued at $2.5 million and belonging to one Judith García. The lawyer also proposed an additional corporate bond of $100,000."

"George W. Bush government continues to refuse to bring terrorism charges against this old CIA agent and FBI informant."

"Ahern affirmed that the United States lacks jurisdiction to try Posada for the attack on the Cubana Aviation airplane in 1976. Surprisingly, the district attorney appeared to ignore the fact that the U.S. government signed the Convention for the Repression of Illicit Acts against Civil Aviation in 1971 and the International Convention for the Suppression of Terrorist Bombings, in effect since 2001.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE) stated months back in a letter to Posada Carriles, that he was a danger to national security due to his long record of criminal activity and violence in which innocent civilians died".

"Two more of Posada’s accomplices, likewise associated with the CANF, were likewise identified in the media as being related to this investigation: Angel Alfonso Alemán, a former employee of Monzón, implicated in 1997 in an assassination attempt on Cuban President Fidel Castro that was thwarted with the unexpected capture of the yacht La Esperanza; and José Alemán, his son.

Incredibly, Angel Alfonso Alemán is now working as a collaborator of Cuban-American Congressman Albio Sires, the former mafioso mayor of West New York, a city in New Jersey, elected to the House of Representatives in November.

However, this paramilitary committee within the CANF and under the directions of its chiefs, which in 1997 took charge of supporting the terrorist campaign carried out by Posada via Central American mercenaries, includes many other criminal elements that nobody is bothered about.

According to the Miami media and several experts on the issue, this group designed to organize terrorist actions includes as members — in addition to the now-deceased former chairman, Jorge Mas Canosa — several very-well known individuals, all of them accomplice to Posada’s crimes, and most of them based a few kilometers from the FBI offices in Miami.

They include, among others, Roberto Martín Pérez, the group’s coordinator, a henchman and son of a henchman under the Batista dictatorship, a proven terrorist, and husband to announcer Ninoska Pérez Castellón; José Antonio Llama, former director of the CANF, who, in June 2006, admitted in The Miami Herald the existence in 1997 of the Foundation’s terrorist wing; Angel Moisés Hernández Rojo, a former CIA agent in the counterinsurgency in Bolivia; Juan Bautista Marquez, a former CIA ship’s captain, now in prison for drug trafficking; and Luis Zúñiga Rey, a personal friend of George W. Bush, who has received him several times at the White House.

Others belonging to this group include Gaspar “Gasparito” Jiménez, Pedro Remón and Guillermo Novo Sampoll, all walking free in Miami after they were shamefully released from prison in Panama; Félix Ismael “El Gato” Rodríguez Mendigutía, who murdered Che Guevara on orders of the CIA; the doctor Alberto Hernández and José Francisco `Pepe' Hernández; Feliciano Foyo, now a CLC capo; his associate Horacio García¼ and quite a few more.

When Posada, alias “Solo,” was asking for money via faxes from Central America and while he was recruiting hit men, the above individuals were the ones who, from New Jersey and Florida, provided him with the resources and encouraged him to carry out his criminal activities.

Despite the fact that the U.S. legal apparatus knows that Posada Carriles is the self-confessed mastermind behind dozens of terrorist conspiracies and bloody attacks, it has not formally charged him; it prefers to dedicate itself to a burlesque legal show in the courtrooms of Texas, by discussing issues that are nothing but anecdotes in the bloody criminal history of this agent of imperialism."

_________________________

Meanwhile :

January 31, 2007 by Austin Statesman (Texas)

Texas Grandmother Sweeps Streets of Washington as Punishment for Protest -

".............

Four months ago, Baker was one of 71 people arrested during a protest in Washington for crossing a police line to sit on the steps of a Senate office building. Diane Baker, who has a degenerative muscle condition, had to work 8 hours in freezing weather. As punishment, the 60-year-old was sentenced to sweep the streets of the nation's capital for eight cold, blustery hours.

"I'm a rather fragile, small woman," said Baker, a hospice chaplain at United Church of Christ in Dallas. "Being a minister, I offered to do counseling, but this is what they gave me." Baker, a mother of four and grandmother of two, suffers from myoclonic epilepsy, a degenerative muscle condition that causes her voice to quiver and hands to shake. As she signed in to begin her community service, she struggled to write her name.

...she said, "I think there are better uses of my resources."

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U.S. judge sets bail for anti-Castro Cuban exile

By Aracely Lazcano

EL PASO, Texas (Reuters)
- A United States judge said on Friday Cuban exile and former CIA operative Luis Posada Carriles should be freed on bail until his trial on immigration fraud charges, but he remained behind bars at the request of federal prosecutors.

Judge Kathleen Cardone said in a written order 79-year-old Posada Carriles, despite "a controversial past" as an opponent of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, was not a flight risk because he is "old, infirm and has strong ties to the community."

She set bail at a total of $350,000 and said Posada Carriles must wear an electronic monitoring device and live under house arrest with his wife in Miami.....

Full story:

http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idU...07?pageNumber=1

Not a flight risk???!

He escaped from a Venezuelan prison!

So what kind of strings had to be pulled to get that bail set?

And now he has to get either killed (as Castro said) or pardoned or scuttled off to another country.

Maybe he can go wherever Key Lay is (and lay low...)

Edited by Myra Bronstein
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  • 3 years later...

From counterpunch.org

El Paso Diary: Day 21 in the Trial of Posada Carriles

By JOSÉ PERTIERRA

February 28, 2011

Excerpt:

A new paradigm?

Government policy is only a memorandum, a record of an agreement policymakers may retract tomorrow. For decades, the United States Department of Justice has given anti-Cuban terrorists a pass. Things may be changing.

It is significant that its Counterterrorism Unit is prosecuting Posada Carriles with the full collaboration of the Cuban government, using as a star witness a lieutenant colonel from Cuba's counterintelligence unit as well as documents prepared by forensic specialists in Cuba. The American Justice Department's Counterterrorism team working hand in hand with the Cuban Ministry of the Interior's Counterintelligence team to stem five decades of U.S.-sponsored terrorism against the island is a new paradigm for U.S.-Cuba relations.

Terrorists in our midst

As the historian Peter Kornbluh, of the National Security Archive, told me, "After the Bay of Pigs, the Kennedys unleashed a wave of violent exiles against Cuba through Operation Mongoose as well as more autonomous actions." The purpose of the CIA undercover operation known as Mongoose was to destroy the Cuban revolution. Its plans included the assassination of President Fidel Castro and other leaders, the use of sabotage and attacks on civilian targets. Terrorism was a favorite weapon of the United States in its undeclared war against Cuba.

The head of Operation Mongoose was the then U.S. Attorney General, Robert F. Kennedy, from the same Justice Department where Timothy J. Reardon, III, now works. While still attorney general, Kennedy began distancing himself from the Cuban extremists of Operation Mongoose.

Author David Talbot described Robert Kennedy's conundrum with the so-called Cuban exiles. "As he tried to establish control over CIA operations and to herd the rambunctious Cuban exile groups into a unified progressive front, Bobby learned what a swamp of intrigue the anti-Castro world was. Working out of a sprawling Miami station code-named JM/WAVE that was second in size only to the CIA's Langley, VA, headquarters, the agency had recruited an unruly army of Cuban militants to launch raids on the island and even contracted Mafia henchmen to kill Castro—including mob bosses Johnny Rosselli, Santo Trafficante and Sam Giancana, whom Kennedy, as chief counsel for the Senate Rackets Committee in the late 1950s, had targeted. It was an overheated ecosystem that was united not just by its fevered opposition to the Castro regime, but by its hatred for the Kennedys, who were regarded as traitors for failing to use the full military might of the United States against the communist outpost in the Caribbean."

Robert Kennedy's growing understanding of the mentality of these Cuban extremists led him to suspect them of assassinating President John F. Kennedy. On the afternoon of November 22, 1963, Kennedy called Enrique "Harry" Ruiz-Williams, a Bay of Pigs veteran and one of the leaders of the Cubans involved in Operation Mongoose, and told him point-blank, "One of your guys did it."

Full story: http://www.counterpunch.org/pertierra02282011.html

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His crimes are detailed here:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKposada.htm

A discussion of his crimes can be found here:

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=6539

It is also worth considering his friend and comrade, Orlando Bosch:

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/JFKbosch.htm

http://educationforum.ipbhost.com/index.php?showtopic=5182

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